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Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

NLM Teleconference to Report on RFI and New Funding Mechanism for 2016-2021

Monday, January 26th, 2015

In May 2014, the National Library of Medicine posted a Request for Information (RFI) asking for ideas on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) (http://nnlm.gov) can more effectively and efficiently provide equal access to biomedical information and improve an individual’s access to health information.  Based on the feedback from nearly 50 respondents and a review of historical data related to the program, NLM will change the award mechanism for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Libraries’ cycle from contracts to cooperative agreements.  This type of funding mechanism will allow NLM to participate more fully in the work of the RMLs and better coordinate collaborative programs and projects.  A Notice of Intent was published on the NIH Grants & Funding site on January 22, 2015.

Join NLM in a teleconference to hear about the responses to the RFI and learn about Cooperative Agreements:

  • Tuesday, January 27, 2015 / 4 pm (ET)
  • Teleconference Number:  1-888-450-5996
  • Participant Passcode: 662939

The world’s largest biomedical library, the National Library of Medicine maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology.

SciENcv Enhancements: NIH and NSF Biographical Sketch Formats

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

SciENcv enhancements will include the new NIH biographical sketch format as a choice for creating SciENcv profiles. SciENcv will continue to support the current NIH biographical sketch format; however, NIH encourages researchers to use the new format with their grant submissions. Researchers will be required to employ the new NIH biographical sketch starting May 25, 2015. Users will be able to utilize their existing Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) profiles to create profiles in the new NIH biographical sketch format, as well as be able to select the new NIH biographical sketch format when creating profiles manually or through a data feed from an external source. The Personal Statement section of the NIH biographical sketch has been updated to include an option to list up to four peer-reviewed citations. A new section, Contribution to Science, replaces the former section Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications, and it aims to give researchers a place where they can describe five of their most significant contributions to science.

SciENcv users will also soon be able to create profiles in the National Science Foundation (NSF) biographical sketch format. This newly added format will be available to download in PDF, MS Word or XML, and users will be able to share their SciENcv NSF profiles through a public URL. In addition, by linking your NSF account to an NCBI account, you will be able to populate SciENcv profiles with information stored in your NSF account. The NSF biographical sketch is the official format used for grant submissions to the NSF and consists of five sections: Professional Preparation, Appointments, Products, Synergistic Activities, and Collaborators & Other Affiliations.

For more information visit the NLM Technical Bulletin articles: My NCBI – New NIH Biographical Sketch Available in SciENcv and My NCBI – National Science Foundation Biographical Sketch and Data Integration with SciENcv.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

National Library of Medicine Resource Update: Alternatives to Animal Testing Portal

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Alternatives to Animal Testing (ALTBIB) portal provides access to PubMed/MEDLINE citations relevant to alternatives to the use of live vertebrates in biomedical research and testing. The ALTBIB topics and subtopics are aligned with current U.S. and international approaches. For example, information is provided on in silico, in vitro, and refined or improved animal testing methods. Strategies that incorporate validated methods and other approaches are also covered. In addition to the topic areas for PubMed searches, the ALTBIB portal includes a searchable bibliographic collection of alternatives to animal testing, including citations from published articles, books, book chapters, and technical reports published from 1980 to 2000.

The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), part of NLM’s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET), now includes subheadings (“/alternative/ and /in vitro tests/”) in the Human and Non-Human Toxicity Excerpts fields. These subheadings allow users to locate data from in vitro and other alternative methods. For example, users can search “ALTERNATIVE IN VITRO TESTS” to locate records with this data. Coverage includes results from methods validated by the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) and the European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL-ECVAM).

E-Books Go Out of Fashion as Book Sales Revive

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

http://time.com/3661173/book-sales-increase-ereaders-slump/

E-Science Program

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Are you new to e-Science, unsure what it means, or interested in exploring possible roles for your library? The following resources are great starting points for understanding e-Science and research data management:

The New England e-Science Program offers the following e-Science resources, tools, and events for librarians:

  • E-Science Portal for New England Librarians: “A librarians’ link to e-Science resources,” includes an e-Science Thesaurus, resources on data management, data literacy, data publishing, science primers, Science Boot Camp resources, research funders’ policies, and professional development opportunities.
  • E-Science Community blog: a forum for thoughtful commentaries and articles by librarians and library students engaged in various aspects of research data support services, news announcements, and a calendar of upcoming events. (Follow the e-Science Community on Twitter @NERescience).
  • Journal of eScience Librarianship (JeSLIB): an open access peer review journal dedicated to advancing the discipline of eScience librarianship. JESLIB explores the many roles of librarians in supporting eScience and features articles by contributors from all areas of the globe related to education, outreach, collaborations, policy, tools, and best practices.
  • New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum is an instructional tool for teaching data management best practices to undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers in the health sciences, sciences, and engineering disciplines. Each of the curriculum’s seven online instructional modules aligns with the National Science Foundation’s data management plan recommendations and addresses universal data management challenges.
  • University of Massachusetts and New England Area e-Science Symposium, April 9, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (Event is free, but due to limited space, advance registration is required.)
  • Science Boot Camp for Librarians , June 17-19, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. Organized by a collaboration of New England STEM and health sciences librarians, each Science Boot Camp offers immersive sessions on three science subjects and a Capstone session on topics relevant to STEM and health sciences librarianship. Agenda for the 2015 science boot camp will be announced by the end of February. Registration opens April 9.

For further information about the e-Science Program, or if you would like to be added to the e-Science Community of Interest mailing list, contact Donna Kafel, Project Coordinator for the New England e-Science Program at Donna.Kafel@umassmed.edu

Mobile Data Solutions Course

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Are you curious about the use of smart phones, tablets, or other mobile data resources to collect data for your assessment project, but are seeking more information on how to determine if this is the right approach for your project or program and how to process the data you collect using this method?

Check out http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/, which was created as part of the Mobile Solutions Technical Assistance and Research (mSTAR) project, with expertise provided by U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Digital Development Lab and designed by TechChange.

The primary goal of this freely available and accessible online course (free registration is required to access it) is to learn more about mobile tools, processes, and strategies for data collection in order to use mobile devices (referred to as mobile data solutions) to their full potential in doing so. The course will take about 2 hours to complete and can be done at your own pace over time. Your progress in the course is saved so you’ll be taken to the point where you stopped to continue learning the next time you access it.

The learning objectives of the course are

  • Describe examples of mobile data solutions from collection through visualization
  • Articulate the benefit of using these solutions
  • Analyze the challenges and limitations associated with mobile data solutions
  • Assess whether or not particular mobile data solutions are appropriate for a project, program or problem
  • Outline how to design a project or activity to include mobile data solutions
  • Explain the steps involved in implementing mobile data solutions
  • Summarize how to analyze, visualize, and share mobile data

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH. The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, PubMed/MEDLINE may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary. On December 16, NLM resumed daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed.

NLM Resource Update: TOXNET Now Provides Permalinks to Individual Records

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

TOXNET is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/. TOXNET includes the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) which provides toxicity data for over 5,700 potentially hazardous chemicals. HSDB also has information on emergency handling procedures, industrial hygiene, environmental fate, human exposure, detection methods, and regulatory requirements. HSDB is one of the features of WISER, the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/.

Permanent links to National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET records are now provided for HSDB as well as TOXLINE, LactMed, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART), Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER), Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS), and GENE-TOX.

To create a permanent link, click on the “Permalink” button found in the upper right of a TOXNET record. This provides a pop-up window with a URL to share or to save for retrieving the record at a later time.

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

In September, the OERC blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.