Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About MAR | Contact MAR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Technology and Libraries’ Category

Library Technology Reports Issue on Tablets & Mobile Devices

Friday, July 18th, 2014

This is a call for proposals of case studies to be included in an issue of Library Technology Reports (published by ALA TechSource) focusing on the strategic and intentional integration of tablets and mobile devices into library services.  This issue will be edited by Rebecca K. Miller, Heather Moorefield-Lang, and Carolyn Meier, and will be published in Summer 2015.

In past publications (available here: http://tabletsinlibraries.tumblr.com/book), we have explored how libraries are integrating tablets and other mobile devices into library services, highlighting best practices and effective methods.  However, now that libraries have had a few years to experiment with these technologies, we are interested in exploring the question of how libraries strategically integrate these technologies into their services.  Case studies selected for inclusion in this report will demonstrate effective practices for intentionally integrating technologies in any areas of library services.  These practices may include, but are not limited to:  front-end or need assessments, cost-benefit analyses, user experience research, and summative and formative evaluations.  We will accept 4-6 case studies, and expect that each case study will total around 3,000 words.

In order to submit a proposal, please send a 1-2 paragraph summary of your case study–which should include a description of your project, the methods you used to gather data about the project, and the decision that your library made based on the data–along with a current CV highlighting relevant experience and publications.  Proposals and accompanying material should be submitted by August 15, 2014 to: tabletsinlibraries@gmail.com.  We will notify authors of the editors’ decision regarding their proposal(s) by September 1, 2014.

Ultimately, we hope that this issue of Library Technology Reports will help readers be able to

Think more critically about the technologies that they want to integrate into their libraries

Identify and use new methods for gathering and analyzing data related to integrating technologies into their libraries

Make sound investments in and decisions about the time and resources spent on integrating technologies into their libraries

Anticipated timeline of project:

August 15, 2014:  Deadline for submitting proposals for contributed chapters to editors

September 1, 2014:  All contributors notified of acceptance or rejection of chapter proposal

November 1, 2014:  Full contributions (around 3,000 words) due to editors

December 1, 2014:  Editors send revisions to authors

January 15, 2015:  Revised chapters due back to editors

February 1, 2015:  Authors receive final suggested revisions from editors

March 1, 2015:  Final manuscripts due to editors

March 2015:  Editors assemble manuscript and finalize entire report

April 1, 2015:  Editors deliver final manuscript to ALA for publication

Questions can be directed to all editors via email: tabletsinlibraries@gmail.com

This information is also available on our project website: http://tabletsinlibraries.tumblr.com/post/91111099979/call-for-proposals-new-issue-of-library-technology

Rebecca K. Miller

Assistant Director, Learning Services

University Libraries, Virginia Tech

Blacksburg, VA 24062-9001

(540) 231-9669

millerrk@vt.edu

http://rebeccakatemiller.com/

Visualization Literacy

Friday, July 18th, 2014

With an increase of technology tools available for data reporting and visualization, sometimes it’s challenging to know how to best use them to clearly communicate the intended meaning of data. The concept of visualization literacy and a broader theme of visual literacy are often not included as part of the instructions guiding people in the steps to create their own visualization design.

A recent entry by Andrew Kirk on the blog of Seeing Data, a research project in the United Kingdom studying how people understand big data visualizations shown in the media, offers a great review of 8 Articles Discussing Visual and Visualization Literacy that are freely available and well worth a read to better understand both visual and visualization literacy. Their featured articles include resources ranging from the importance of Visual Literacy in an Age of Data to How to Be an Educated Consumer of Infographics, and Seeing Data has asked that you share additional ones with them via blog comments or their Twitter social media account @SeeingData.

Ready, Set, Go: Easy-to-Use Online Tools to Create Effective How-To Tutorials (TechTime session)

Friday, July 11th, 2014

MAR offers 1 MLA Continuing Education (CE) credit per session—details will be provided at the end of the session.

Presenter:      Andrew Youngkin, Emerging Technologies / Evaluation Coordinator, NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A)

Date / Time: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 / 11 am – Noon (ET)

Where:             Online / No Registration Required

Summary: This presentation will feature a select group of easy-to-use, (mostly) free online tools to plan and create online tutorials (aka, screencasts). Key features of these online tutorial creation tools will be demonstrated and best practices for screencasting, including voice-over narration and
storyboarding, will be discussed.

Save the Dates: 2015 A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI Course

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Attention librarians in the United States who wish to initiate and/or extend bioinformatics services at your institution! The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the NLM Training Center (NTC) will be offering “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” course in 2015. Participants who complete the class will be eligible for Medical Library Association (MLA) Continuing Education credits. The course is free, but travel costs are at the expense of the participant. However, you typically have to submit an application to attend, due to limited enrollment.

There are two parts to the course, and applicants must take both parts:

  • Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” is a six-week, online (asynchronous) pre-course.
  • Part 2: A five-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland.

Important Dates:

  • Monday, September 29, 2014 – Watch for a detailed announcement about the course and application process here in the NLM Technical Bulletin.
  • Monday, November 17, 2014 – Application deadline
  • Monday, December 15, 2014 – Acceptance notifications e-mailed
  • Monday, January 12, 2015 – “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching” pre-course begins
  • Monday, March 9, 2015 – “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” five-day in-person class begins at NLM

Mark your calendars for this training opportunity.

IMPORTANT: For network members of NN/LM MAR, consider applying for a professional development award to cover your travel costs. BUT you should not apply for the award until they are known to be accepted.

Community Health Maps Blog

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Community Health Maps Blog (communityhealthmaps.nlm.nih.gov) is an initiative designed to share information about free and low cost and easy-to-use applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping tools. The goal is to help community-based and other types of small organizations collect and visualize information about their communities with an eye towards using these techniques to support planning and decision-making about community health. The tools discussed on the Community Health Maps Blog can support the collection and visualization of health statistics, demographic information, community resources, and events thereby facilitating a better understanding of community conditions.

Why Blog?

The interactive nature of blogging helps Community Health Maps share information about hardware platforms and software applications available to communities as they consider how, or if, they might use GIS.

NLM encourages the submission of blog postings by those who use such resources to carry out projects within their communities as well as those who have identified additional applications that may be of interest for this purpose.

PubMed Instructional Materials (for Trainers)

Friday, July 11th, 2014

If you are involved with training people on PubMed resources, the NLM has a web page rich with links to instructional materials: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/pm_training.html

What Kind of Library Users are in Your Community?

Friday, July 11th, 2014

The Pew Internet & American Life Project is pleased to announced the creation of a new tool that helps you gather data about library habits and attitudes of your own community.  Librarians, educators, and other groups can now create their own unique “community version” of the Pew’s library user quiz and can invite members of their community to participate with a unique URL.  Learn more about the quiz and community tool on the Pew’s blog.

Implications of FDA Regulation of Medical Devices: When is an iPad More than an iPad?

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

11-12 MT, 12-1 CT

Register Here

On September 25, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Final Guidance on Mobile Medical Applications. As applications on mobile devices are increasingly used in health care, the FDA has now provided a framework for determining if a mobile device running a health app is a medical device. To illustrate the significance of this guidance and what it means for the future use of mobile applications in patient care and education, the AAMC is hosting a webinar with Sharon R. Klein, JD, partner at Pepper Hamilton, LLP to explore how it plays into the larger picture of data privacy, patient care, and government regulations. For more information, please contact gir@aamc.org.

Low Cost Mapping Tools for Community-Based Organizations

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Community Health Maps Blog is an initiative designed to share information about free and low cost and easy-to-use applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping tools. The goal is to help community-based and other types of small organizations collect and visualize information about their communities with an eye towards using these techniques to support planning and decision-making about community health. The tools discussed on the Community Health Maps Blog can support the collection and visualization of health statistics, demographic information, community resources, and events, thereby facilitating a better understanding of community conditions.

The interactive nature of blogging helps Community Health Maps share information about hardware platforms and software applications available to communities as they consider how, or if, they might use GIS. NLM encourages the submission of blog postings by those who use such resources to carry out projects within their communities, as well as those who have identified additional applications that may be of interest for this purpose.

Data Burger: A Good Questionnaire Response Rate Plus Basic Quantitative Data Analysis (Boost Box session)

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

MAR offers 1 MLA Continuing Education (CE) credit per session—details will be provided at the end of the session.

Presenter:     Nikki Dettmar, Evaluation Librarian, NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Date / Time: Thursday, July 22, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:            Online / No Registration Required

Summary: Many of us use questionnaires to learn about our stakeholders’ attitudes and knowledge. Let’s picture this as a burger: The data we collect is like the meat in the filling, and we wrap the data in a tasty bun (summaries, graphs, and charts) to present it.

Meat: We want to use the best ingredients for our filling and collect good data. The question “What is a ‘good’ response rate?” often comes up. What does “response rate” mean, and why is it important? And how do you know what your response rate is? We’ll go over practical steps you can take to increase the number of people who complete and return the questionnaires that you send to them. We’ll also talk about some strategies for addressing low response rates.

Bun: Once you have administered a questionnaire, what do you do with all those numbers? The next section of this webinar will be about preparing and presenting those numbers. It will provide a very quick review of basic quantitative data analysis, including descriptive statistics and suggestions for selecting types of charts or graphs to illustrate your data.