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Archive for the ‘Technology and Libraries’ Category

Top 100 Altmetrics papers for 2014

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Here’s the Top 100 Altmetrics List for 2014 – the 100 papers with the highest scores as calculated by Altmetrics.

http://www.altmetric.com/top100/2014/?utm_source=announcement&utm_medium=emails&utm_term=2014top100&utm_campaign=top1002014emails

NIH News in Health

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Check out the December issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

Feeling Stressed? Stress Relief Might Help Your Health
Winter holidays—do they fill you with joy or with worries about gift-giving and family gatherings? Do summer vacations leave you relaxed or fretful over travel and money? If you’re feeling stressed out over supposedly fun things, it might be time to reassess. Take a few moments to learn how stress affects your health and what you can do about it.

When Your Back Hurts: Don’t Let Back Pain Knock You Flat
Is your back hurting? You’re in good company. In any 3-month period, about 1 in 4 adults in the U.S. has at least one day of back pain, mostly in the lower back.

Detecting Rare Disease-Causing Glitches
For people with suspected rare genetic conditions, getting an accurate diagnosis can be difficult and frustrating. A new study suggests that a fast, powerful technique called whole-exome sequencing can help doctors pinpoint the causes of many hard-to-diagnose genetic conditions.

A Priceless Gift: Your Family Health History
Conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes often run in families. Tracing the illnesses of your parents, grandparents, and other blood relatives can help your health care practitioner predict your risk for specific disorders. It could suggest vital screening tests and treatments before any disease is evident. That’s why it’s so important to discuss your family’s health history.

Featured Website: Go4Life
This interactive site helps adults, ages 50 and older, to fit more physical activity into their days. A science-based exercise guide, videos, success stories, motivational tips, and free materials can help you get ready, start exercising, and keep moving.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

All of us in MAR would like to wish you and your families a very Happy Thanksgiving!

  • Barbara Epstein, Renae Barger, Michelle Burda, Sue Burke, Lydia Collins, Kate Flewelling, Missy Harvey, and Tristan Lucchetti

Lending a Helping Hand: MAR Mentoring Program

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

If you cannot see where you are going, ask someone who has been there before. J Loren Norris

We know that in the ever changing environment of healthcare, hospital librarians have had to adapt their services and skills to these changes.  Those that have risen to the challenge of change have much to offer medical librarians new to the profession, new to health sciences librarianship,  and to those adapting to technology changes, or adapting to being a solo librarian.

  • Are you someone who could benefit from having a mentor?
  • Or are you someone who would like to share your expertise and experience with others?

If you answered Yes to either question, please contact Michelle Burda to learn about our new program: mburda@pitt.edu or (412) 624-1589.

PubMed Central Citation Exporter Feature Now Available

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

PubMed Central (PMC) is happy to announce the addition of a citation exporter feature. This feature makes it easy to retrieve either styled citations that you can copy/paste into your manuscripts, or to download them into a format compatible with your bibliographic reference manager software.

When viewing a search results page, each result summary will now include a “Citation” link. When, clicked, this will open a pop-up window that you can use to copy/paste citations formatted in one of three popular styles: American Medical Association (AMA), Modern Library Association (MLA), or American Psychological Association (APA).

Also, the box has links at the bottom that can be used to download the citation information in one of three machine-readable formats, which most bibliographic reference management software can import. The same citation box can also be invoked from an individual article, either in classic view (with the “Citation” link among the list of formats) or the PubReader view, by clicking on the citation information just below the article title in the banner.

Data Visualization Options Flowchart

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Looking for an “at a glance” single page to determine which type of data visualization chart is helpful in order to clearly communicate your results?

This PDF flowchart at http://betterevaluation.org/plan/describe/visualise_data is a very handy reference! The flowchart guides you towards considering the appropriate data visualization chart options after your initial response to the question of “What would you like to show?” answers of comparison, distribution, composition, or relationship.

There are brief descriptions of the charts at the Better Evaluation data visualization page that you can click through to get additional information such as a deviation bar graph that includes synonyms, a base definition, examples of how the chart is used, advice about their use, and links to resources for creating them.

Check Out Our Fall Issue of The MAReport!

Friday, November 21st, 2014

UCSC Genome Browser Workshops in Pittsburgh, PA

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Presenter: Dr. Robert Kuhn, Associate Director, UCSC Genome Browser / Jack Baskin School of Engineering, University of California – Santa Cruz (UCSC)

Date / Time: December 4 and 5, 2014 (see details below)

Where: University of Pittsburgh, Scaife Hall, 4th floor, Lecture Room 1

Registration is free

Summary: For 14 years, the UCSC Genome Browser has been providing a visual display for genomic data from human and other organisms (now numbering more than 80). Serving nearly 200,000 different users monthly, the Browser has grown to be a collection of bioinformatics tools useful for many applications in biomedical research. Dr. Robert Kuhn is coming to the University of Pittsburgh to teach introductory and advanced sessions on the use and applications of the Genome Browser. These sessions are open to all researchers, and suitable for all levels of experience from complete novice to experienced user.

  • Participants must bring their laptops
  • Afternoon sessions will have ample time for 1-on-1 conversations on any topic of interest
  • Funding for these training sessions was provided by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NN/LM MAR)
  • Event sponsored by the Molecular Biology Information Service of the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS), University of Pittsburgh

Registration

Thursday, December 4th

9:30 – 11:30 am / Session 1: Introduction to the UCSC Genome Browser
Topics will include, but are not limited to:

  • Browser navigation and paradigm
  • Custom tracks
  • Saving sessions for future reference and sharing
  • Table Browser
  • Register Session 1

1 – 5 pm / Session 2: Interactive, hands-on problem solving

Friday, December 5th

9:30 – 11:30 am / Session 3: Advanced UCSC Genome Browser topics
Topics will include, but are not limited to:

  • BLAT
  • Table Browser joins, intersections, and filters
  • Display of next-gen sequencing results: BAM & VCF files
  • Variant Annotation Integrator
  • Register Session 3

1 – 5 pm / Session 4: Interactive, hands-on problem solving

Please contact the HSLS Molecular Biology Information Service with any questions.

Resource Update: ChemIDplus Drawing Feature

Friday, November 21st, 2014

The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) ChemIDplus resource is a dictionary of over 400,000 chemicals (names, synonyms, and structures). It includes links to NLM and to other databases and resources, including ones to federal, state and international agencies. You can draw a chemical structure and search for similar substances using the ChemIDplus Advanced search interface. This feature also performs similarity and substructure searches. A four-minute tutorial is available for using the drawing feature of ChemIDplus. The ChemIDplus Lite interface is designed for simple searching on name or registry number.

Librarians in the Wonderful Land of Oz: Gaming in Adult Learning (TechTime session)

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Presenters:

John Bramble, Technology Coordinator / MidContinental Region (MCR)

Matt Steadman, Web Software Developer / MidContinental Region (MCR)

Date / Time:  Monday, December 8, 2014 / 11 am – Noon (ET)

Wherehttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/techtime/

Online / No Registration Required / 1 MLA CE will be awarded

Summary: Come learn about a professional development engagement technique called “Online Interactive Professional Development Experience” (OLPDE), informally known as Gaming in Adult Learning.  The technique is a way to combine a human’s propensity for combining play with learning new or strengthening existing skills.

There will be a demonstration of Librarians in the Wonderful Land of Oz (LITWLOO), a game being used by the NN/LM MidContinental Region (MCR) as another way to encourage Network members to develop skills beneficial to the practice of health sciences librarianship.

Participants will leave with:

  • an increased understanding of how play and learning go hand-in-hand
  • an increased understanding of the teaching methods use in the NN/LM MCR’s OLPDE; and
  • a better understanding of LITWLOO and how to play the game to earn points and free continuing education credits from the Medical Library Association (MLA)