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Archive for the ‘Technology and Libraries’ Category

Using the New NCBI Variation Viewer to Explore Human Genetic Variation

Monday, August 11th, 2014

On August 13th, NCBI will host a webinar entitled “Using the New NCBI Variation Viewer to Explore Human Genetic Variation”. This presentation will show you how to find human sequence variants by chromosome position, gene, disease names and database identifiers (RefSNP, Variant region IDs) using NCBI’s new Variation Viewer (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/variation/view).

 

This presentation will show you how to find human sequence variants by chromosome position, gene, disease names, and database identifiers(RefSNP, Variant region ids) using NCBI’s new Variation Viewer (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/variation/view). You will learn how to browse the genome, navigate by gene or exon, filter results by one or more categories including allele frequencies from 1000 Genomes or GO-ESP, and link to related information in NCBI’s molecular databases and medical genetics resources such as ClinVar, MedGen and GTR. You will also be shown how to upload your own data to add to the display, and download results. Anyone who works with clinical or research variation data will find that the Variation Viewer provides a convenient and powerful way to access human variation data in a genomic context that is fully integrated with all other NCBI tools and databases.

 

To register, please go to: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2762824590748330498.

NIH Public Access Policy Webinars

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Announcing two free webinars about the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy (http://publicaccess.nih.gov) and the role of libraries, graciously hosted by the NIH and by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region.

 

The NIH Public Access Policy – Information for Librarians (August 19)

 

Join us for a discussion about the NIH Public Access Policy and the critical role libraries play. This webinar will:

  • Review basics of the public access policy, and the role of librarians;
  • Present the Public Access Compliance Monitor;
  • Answer questions about the policy sent to us in advance via the online registration form;
  • Address issues and questions raised during the webinar.

 

Please list any questions you would like us to address during the webinar in the “Questions & Comments” section located on the online registration page.

 

Title: The NIH Public Access Policy – Information for Librarians

Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT

 

Presented by Dr. Neil Thakur, National Institutes of Health, and by Kathryn Funk, National Library of Medicine.

 

Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/269124766 or by clicking

Space is limited, so reserve your seat now!

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

Logistics for this webinar, including additional questions, comments and feedback may be sent to:  OERwebinars@mail.nih.gov.

 

The NIH Public Access Policy – Views from the Library Trenches (August 26)

 

You’ve heard the specifics of the NIH Policy. Now find out how librarians are responding to the need to get researchers up to speed on compliance with the policy. Join us to find out:

  • What strategies librarians are using to support their communities. What’s worked; and what hasn’t;
  • How to get started, and which groups to work with at your institution;
  • What tools librarians can use to help researchers and improve compliance rates;
  • How librarians can work with each other to improve outcomes.

 

This webinar will feature presentations from three libraries with experience on the ground helping researchers with the NIH Public Access Policy, followed by a Q&A with the audience. The following presenters will discuss their unique approaches in the trenches of supporting and providing outreach on the policy:

 

Emily Mazure, Duke University Medical Center Library

Susan Steelman and Jessie Casella, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Library

Scott Lapinski, Harvard University, Countway Library of Medicine

 

Title: The NIH Public Access Policy – Views from the Library Trenches

Date: Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Time: 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

 

Join the webinar on August 26 at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/npap/

For audio, dial 1-800-605-5167, and enter participant code: 816440

Building Health Literate Organizations

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Building Health Literate Organizations: A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change describes how organizations can move forward in achieving the attributes described in the Institute of Medicine discussion paper, “Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations”. The guidebook:

  • helps health care organizations of any size engage in organizational change to become health literate
  • complements many excellent health literacy resources, helping organizations use them effectively and reliably

The guidebook contains chapters and a case study on key health literacy development areas that intersect with the attributes of health literate health care organizations:

  • Engaging leadership
  • Preparing the workforce
  • The care environment
  • Involving populations served
  • Verbal communication
  • Reader-friendly materials

Each chapter answers these questions:

  • Why? Why do you need to address health literacy issues in this area? Why is it important?
  • What? What would success in this area look like? What are the target outcomes? Success may include changes to process, behavior, and attitudes, as well as health outcomes.
  • How? What tools, resources, and actions will you use to reach the target outcomes?

The guidebook offers an approach that enables organizations to start where they can begin to build a pattern of success, expanding to more than one area, eventually working in all key areas for results that can be sustained.

Building Health Literate Organizations:  A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change, authored by Mary Ann Abrams, Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, Audrey Riffenburgh, and Barbara Savage, is available at www.healthliterateorganization.org.

The guidebook is available as a free, online resource so it may be downloaded, copied, and reproduced, as long as all the attributions and sources are included.

Re-skilling for Research

Monday, August 11th, 2014

New Report from RLUK “Re-skilling for Research” Looks at Changing Needs of Researchers and Effects on Libraries: http://www.infodocket.com/2012/02/01/new-report-from-rluk-re-skilling-for-research-looks-at-changing-needs-of-researchers/

The Value Study as a Tool for Library Advocacy (Boost Box session)

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Presenters:

  • Joanne Gard Marshall, Distinguished Research Professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Julia Sollenberger, Associate Vice President and Director, Medical Center Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center

Date / Time: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:             https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary: The speakers will present the results of the Value Study the most useful for library advocacy and discuss how results are being used by librarians across the country. Over 16,000 physicians, residents and nurses served by 56 libraries participated in the study. As a result, the findings can be used by both participating and non-participating libraries.

Librarians are using the results to advocate for the importance of the library through posters, presentations, newsletters and personal contacts with administrators, educators and clinicians. Time saved by health professionals is also being also converted into dollars saved to show cost-effectiveness. Our examples show that librarians are using the results, but customizing their advocacy efforts so that they have maximum impact on their institution.

Librarians are making frequent use of the resources available on the Value Study website: http://nnlm.gov/mar/about/value.html, containing an overview of the study results suitable for presentation. Librarians are welcome to use the full presentation or key slides as needed.  Specialized PowerPoint summary reports are also available based on geographic region, as well as AAHSL and non-AAHSL sites, and the profession of respondents. The site provides access to the data and all supporting materials, including the survey. Features encourage data use, benchmarking with similar types of libraries, as well as study replication. Links to peer reviewed journal articles based on the study results are also available on the site. Two new publications, one in a nursing journal and one in a health care management journal are about to appear. Results from these additional analyses will be discussed.

Update: Easy-to-Use Online Tools to Create Effective Tutorials

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Ready, Set, Go: Easy-to-Use Online Tools to Create Effective “How-To” Tutorials(TechTime session)

This presentation by Andrew Youngkin of NN/LM SE/A was a big hit! You can find the recording and slides available at: http://nnlm.gov/mar/training/techtime_recordings.html

Andrew has provided additional information based on our discussions below.

References about the effectiveness of online teaching:

  • Measuring medical student preference: a comparison of classroom versus online instruction for teaching PubMed. By: Schimming, Laura M. Journal of the Medical Library Association. Jul2008, Vol. 96 Issue 3, p217-222.

 

  • Evaluation of best practices in the design of online evidence-based practice instructional modules. By: Foster, Margaret J.; Shurtz, Suzanne; Pepper, Catherine. Journal of the Medical Library Association. Jan2014, Vol. 102 Issue 1, p31-40. DOI: 10.3163/1536-5050.102.1.007.

 

  • Graduate Student Library Research Skills: Is Online Instruction Effective? By: Shaffer, Barbara A.. Journal of Library & Information Services In Distance Learning, v5 n1-2 p35-55 2011. (EJ925369)

 

  • Using an Interactive Online Tutorial to Expand Library Instruction. By: Stiwinter, Katherine. Internet Reference Services Quarterly. Jan-Mar2013, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p15-41. 27p. DOI: 10.1080/10875301.2013.777010.

 

  • Using Online Tutorials to Reduce Uncertainty in Information Seeking Behavior. By: Brumfield, Elizabeth Jean. Journal of Library Administration. 2008, Vol. 48 Issue 3/4, p365-377.

 

  • The Effectiveness of Online Video Tutorials as Supplemental Library Instruction. By: Wyant, Nicholas. Kansas Library Association College & University Libraries Section Proceedings, 2013, Vol. 3, p39-43, 6p. Publisher: College & University Libraries Section of KULS.

 

  • Assessing Patron Learning from an Online Library Tutorial By: Blummer, Barbara. Community & Junior College Libraries, v14 n2 p121-138 2007. (EJ840542)

 

  • Are Online Tutorials Effective? A Comparison of Online and Classroom Library Instruction Methods By: Silver, Susan L.; Nickel, Lisa T., Research Strategies, v20 n4 p389-396 2005. (EJ763685)

 

  • On Campus or out of Town: How Publishing Online Tutorials Can Help Your Patrons By: Blake, Lindsay. Computers in Libraries, v29 n4 p11-13, 31 Apr 2009. (EJ835990)

 

  • Now’s the Time: Online Library Orientations By: Farrell, Sandy L.; Driver, Carol; Weathers, Anita. Community & Junior College Libraries, v17 n1 p7-14 2011. (EJ923189)

PubMed Commons Update

Monday, August 4th, 2014

PubMed Commons set the stage for commenting on any publication in PubMed, the world’s largest searchable database of biomedical literature. New infrastructure and design enhancements have been implemented to improve the user experience and support the PubMed Commons community, and they are now live on PubMed and PubMed Commons.

At center stage is new artwork that has been adopted for the PubMed Commons blog, Twitter account, and home page, to present a clear, unified identity across platforms. The home page has also been streamlined to consolidate information about joining and using PubMed Commons in a single page to help users get started. A synopsis of the most recent blog post is now available at the top of the home page to help users stay up-to-date on PubMed Commons.

 

For several months, comment rating has given members the chance to weigh in on what comments they find useful. Visitors to PubMed can see these ratings alongside comments. Ratings are a key element in calculating the comment and commenter scores that determine the appearance of comments in the “Selected comments” stream on the home page. Some new site modifications will highlight contributions to PubMed Commons.

 

On the home page, “Top comments now” will feature the top three recent comments. On PubMed records, “Selected comments” (from the home page stream) prompt the appearance of an icon above abstracts, directing readers to comments below. And now the most recent tweet about a PubMed Commons comment appears on the home page for PubMed searches.  Check it out!

New England Journal of Medicine Articles on Cybersecurity and Health Care

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Share with your Chief Information Officers, heads of IT, and anyone else with an interest in patient data privacy. Both articles will require a subscription.

When ‘Hacktivists’ Target Your Hospital

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1407326

Cybersecurity in Health Care

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1404358

NTIS Reports of Possible Interest

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values.

Report produced in 2014 by the Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

A White House report on big data released May 1 concludes that the explosion of data in today’s world can be an unprecedented driver of social progress, but it also has the potential to eclipse basic civil rights and privacy protections. The report drew praise from business and technology groups for its grasp of how big data analytics could improve education and healthcare, uncover wasteful government spending, and help with the nation’s continuing economic recovery. But those same groups cautioned that government attempts to regulate data collection could interfere with productivity and job growth.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis.

Report produced in 2013 by the National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Mathematical Sciences.

Experiments, observations, and numerical simulations in many areas of science and business are currently generating terabytes of data, and in some cases are on the verge of generating petabytes and beyond. Analyses of the information contained in these data sets have already led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from genomics to astronomy and high-energy physics and to the development of new information-based industries. Traditional methods of analysis have been based largely on the assumption that analysts can work with data within the confines of their own computing environment, but the growth of big data is changing that paradigm, especially in cases in which massive amounts of data are distributed across locations. While the scientific community and the defense enterprise have long been leaders in generating and using large data sets, the emergence of e-commerce and massive search engines has led other sectors to confront the challenges of massive data.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Data Mining Meets HCI: Making Sense of Large Graphs.

Report produced in 2012 by Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Machine Learning Department.

We have entered the age of big data. Massive datasets are now common in science, government and enterprises. Yet, making sense of these data remains a fundamental challenge. Where do we start our analysis. Where to go next. How to visualize our findings. We answers these questions by bridging Data Mining and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to create tools for making sense of graphs with billions of nodes and edges, focusing on (1) Attention Routing: we introduce this idea, based on anomaly detection, that automatically draws people’s attention to interesting areas of the graph to start their analyses. We present three examples Polonium unearths malware from 37 billion machine- file relationships NetProbe fingers bad guys who commit auction fraud. (2) Mixed-Initiative Sensemaking: we present two examples that combine machine inference and visualization to help users locate next areas of interest: Apolo guides users to explore large graphs by learning from few examples of user interest; Graphite finds interesting subgraphs, based on only fuzzy descriptions drawn graphically. (3) Scaling Up: we show how to enable interactive analytics of large graphs by leveraging Hadoop, staging of operations, and approximate computation. This thesis contributes to data mining, HCI, and importantly their intersection, including: interactive systems and algorithms that scale theories that unify graph mining approaches; and paradigms that overcome fundamental challenges in visual analytics. Our work is making impact to academia and society: Polonium protects 120 million people worldwide from malware; NetProbe made headlines on CNN, WSJ and USA Today; Pegasus won an open source software award; Apolo helps DARPA detect insider threats and prevent exfiltration. We hope our Big Data Mantra ‘Machine for Attention Routing Human for Interaction’ will inspire more innovations at the crossroad of data mining and HCI.

 

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Presenter:      Kate Flewelling, Outreach Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Dates:              September 2 – 22, 2014

Where:             Online

Details:             http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=661

Summary: This 3-week, self-paced course will explain what a clinical trial is and why ClinicalTrials.gov is a significant resource; demonstrate ways to search and interpret studies with results on ClinicalTrials.gov; and discuss the unique position of health science librarians to provide education and to advocate for the results database and submission requirements.

Note: Several regions are offering this course. If you are in NY, NJ, PA or DE, please take the session provided by the Middle Atlantic Region.