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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

NLM’s DailyMed Website Redesigned with New Features and Improved Usability

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The National Library of Medicine launched a newly redesigned DailyMed web site. DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the U.S., and is the official provider of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label information. The website provides a standard, comprehensive, up-to-date, look-up and download resource of medication content and labeling found in medication package inserts. Since 2005, when DailyMed was first launched, its usage has increased significantly.

Based on the needs and feedback received from the public, NLM began redesigning the DailyMed web site in 2013. The new site is a responsive design which is now easily accessible on all types of devices, adjusting and optimizing automatically for smart phones to large screen desktop displays. Based on the size of the screen, content will relocate, images will resize, the layout will change, and even the navigation will adjust, to deliver an exceptional user experience no matter what device is being used to view the site.

In addition to responsive design, the following new features are available:

  • Enhanced Search Results to include displaying of NDC Codes, Pill Images, and Package Label Images on the search result page. The information will help users easily identify the drug label. The thumbnail images of drugs, magnification feature, accordions, etc. provide a more user friendly experience.
  • Improved user interface by displaying an accordion-style data presentation, so users don’t have to scroll through the entire label.
  • Simplified page navigation and added definitions & tooltips for industry-specific phrases.
  • A dedicated News page and Article & Presentation Page for users to easily access DailyMed and NLM/FDA drug-related news.

Celebrate Health Literacy Month – Support our Thunderclap Campaign!

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion is celebrating Health Literacy Month by kicking off a Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to understand health information. In order for our mass message to go out, we need to reach 250 supporters by October 15 – and we need your help! Please help us spread the word.

In addition, @healthfinder will tweet weekly conversation starters this month. Feel free to join in our discussions using the hashtag #HealthLit. We look forward to hearing not just what you’re doing this month, but how you’re working to improve health literacy year round!

Sample Tweets

October is Health Literacy Month! Support this HHS Thunderclap in support of clear health info for all. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

Do you agree that everyone should have access to clear health info? Support this Thunderclap: http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

9 in 10 Americans have trouble understanding health info. Join the Thunderclap in support of #HealthLit. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

Sample Facebook Post

It’s Health Literacy Month! We encourage you to support the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to-understand health information for all Americans. Join by Oct. 15th. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

NCBI HIV-1 Website Updated

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The HIV-1, human interaction database has been updated and is now on an improved page. The improved interface includes help documentation and supports structured queries against Gene, as well as browsing, filtering and downloading the protein and replication interaction data sets. The most recent data release (June 2014) includes 12,785 HIV-1, human protein-protein interactions for 3,142 human genes and 1,316 replication interactions for 1,250 human genes. The HIV-1, human interactions project, collates published reports of two types of interactions – HIV-1, human protein interactions, and human gene knock-downs that affect virus replication which are reported as “replication interactions.”

Important Spiritual Care Symposium on Helping Survivors of Bullying

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

http://tinyurl.com/ove6lga

Adding Value to EHRs: Librarians Step Up

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Adding Value to EHRs: Librarians Step Up

Date: October 29, 2014 – 2:00 pm (ET)

Hosted by the HealthIT COI and UConn Health

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.”     ~ Charles Dudley Warner

There is SO much talk about Health IT and EHRs and yet, how many of us can say we’re actively involved?  Attribute this to HIPAA, or politics or a silo mentality at many institutions, librarians are frequently frustrated by a perceived inability to get to the table and contribute.

This webinar features two librarians who ARE involved.  Tune in to hear how one describes ways to become involved and stay in touch with EHRs and hear the experiences of another teaching EPIC’s CADENCE application to employees working at the front desk of her organization.

Register here

Guest speakers include:

Dina McKelvy, MLS, AHIP, Library Manager for Automation and Planning at Maine Medical Center Library

Mina Davenport, MLS,CT, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland

Project Tycho / Data for Health: Open Access to Public Health Data (Boost Box session)

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Presenter: Wilbert van Panhuis, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh

Date / Time:  Tuesday, October 14, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:            https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary:  The Project TychoTM team aims to provide open access to public health data from around the world. Currently, the database contains the entire 125 year history of U.S. weekly nationally notifiable disease surveillance reports. All these data are freely available to the public through an easy-to-use online interface. Oftentimes, restricted access to public health data limits opportunities for scientific discovery and technological innovation. The Project Tycho™ team is continuously engaging in new partnerships with scientists, funding, and public health agencies around the world to add or connect new historical and current datasets to the system. New datasets include global dengue surveillance data and Chikungunya data for Latin America.

The Project Tycho team is collaborating with international partners from a large variety of scientific disciplines to create innovative analytical approaches to add value to public health data. Analytics range from creative data visualizations to reveal population level patterns of disease spread that help to understand disease causality leading to better control strategies. Currently, about 1,300 people from around the world have registered for free to use Project Tycho data and over 17,000 users have visited the website since the launch in November last year. Project Tycho data are used for research, for student theses, dissertations, and homework, for teaching, and for public advocacy. We are excited to present this new resource for the advancement of science and population health.

Update on Ebola / CDC Webinar / NLM Resources

Friday, September 26th, 2014

***As the West Africa Ebola outbreak continues, here’s a reminder of NLM resources that may be of value.***

All of these resources, and others, are listed on the guide “Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources” at http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/ebola_2014.html. The guide is frequently updated and now has a section on “Situation Reports” and has added links to “Free Resources from Publishers.”

Disaster Lit continues to add guidelines from CDC, World Health Organization and others; reports; government documents; factsheets and more.

http://disasterlit.nlm.nih.gov/search/?searchTerms=ebola+OR+hemorrhagic&search.x=45&search.y=11&search=Search

The NLM Emergency Access Initiative, http://eai.nlm.nih.gov/, is available through October 17 for free access to 650 journals, 4,000 reference books and databases. Virology, epidemiology, and infectious disease textbooks have been the most popular.

*NEW* The “Virus Variation: Ebolavirus Resource” for genome and protein sequences is now available from the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/variation/ebola/

Ebola topic pages for the general public are available from MedlinePlus in English (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ebola.html) and in Spanish (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spanish/ebola.html).

NATIONAL CALL: ASPR/CDC Invites YouWebinar on Ebola Preparedness: Detailed Hospital Checklist / Monday, Sept. 29, 3-4 pm ET

You can access this webinar via the following call-in and URL information: Dial in numbers: 888-325-0345. Restrictions may exist when accessing toll free numbers using a mobile telephone.

For Participants:

URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join/

Conference number: PW8836414

Audience passcode: 9909990

Participants can join the event directly at: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW8836414&p=9909990&t=c

Please note that this webinar will support the first 1,000 attendees, but the webinar will be recorded and available at www.phe.gov < http://www.phe.gov/preparedness/Pages/default.aspx >  for future reference.

***Is the Ebola outbreak a topic of interest in your communities or institutions? We’d like to get an anecdotal idea of the nature of requests (if any) you may be getting for Ebola-related information. Please send your observations to cindy_love@nlm.nih.gov, not the list, and I will summarize for sharing.***

NLM Resource Update: Haz-Map Adds 497 New Agents

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated Haz-Map with 497 new agents. It now covers 10,133 biological and chemical agents.

Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the health effects of exposure to chemicals and biologicals at work. Haz-Map links jobs and hazardous tasks with occupational diseases and their symptoms.

More information can be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/hazmap.html.

NLM Resource Update: How Can NLM TOXMAP Be Used by Native Americans and Other Populations?

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Although TOXMAP is not specifically designed for any one particular group, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program and Superfund Programs can be of interest to specific populations such as Native Americans by helping to find sources of chemical releases and contamination in locations of interest to them.

In the beta version of TOXMAP, click on the “Zoom to Location” icon, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “Address or Place” search box, then click “Zoom to.”

In TOXMAP classic click on “Zoom to a Place”, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “other place name” search box, then click “Submit”. You can also overlay US Census data by race: “American Indian and Alaskan Native” (1990) or “One Race: American Indian and Alaska Native” and “Two or More Races Including American Indian and Alaska Native” (2000).

For more information, see the TOXMAP and Native American Populations page.

Check Out the Latest Issue of the MAReport

Sunday, September 21st, 2014