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Archive for the ‘Outreach’ Category

Teleconference Today—Interested in Leading the Regional Medical Library Program?

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) seeks candidates with experience in program coordination and health information policy for a Supervisory Librarian to lead our Regional Medical Library program.

If you are interested in this position, we strongly encourage you to attend our informational webinar on February 23, 2015 from 3 – 4 pm (ET).

Click here to register

The Head of the National Network Office (NNO) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) serves as a national leader in developing collaborations among libraries in the Network.

The NNO Head is responsible for monitoring, evaluating, and advising on all aspects of biomedical information provision, for outreach to groups experiencing health disparities, and for the provision of access to medical information in emergency and disaster situations (national and international).  The Head also advises on public health information policy issues related to programs conducted throughout the Network.

NLM is in the process of transitioning our agreements with the Regional Medical Libraries from a contract funding mechanism to a grant cooperative agreement.  The Head will serve as Chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the organizations awarded these cooperative agreements.

As a supervisory librarian at the GS-15 level, the position has a salary range of $126,245-$158,700, and reports to the Associate Director for Library Operations, Joyce Backus.

NLM will begin accepting applications for this position in early March.  At that time, we will release a second announcement with a link to the actual application.

We hope that you will consider applying for this exciting leadership opportunity.

If you have any additional questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!

From Beyond Our Borders: Providing Health Information to Refugee Populations

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Presenter:           Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Date / Time:       March 13th / 10 – 11:30 am (ET)

Where:               Erie County Public Library, Admiral Room

Register:              http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=485

Summary: This hands-on in-person class is designed to assist librarians and others who work with refugee populations in locating health information. The resources presented are selected for their emphasis on providing culturally relevant information in the preferred language of the population. Background information on refugees in the U.S. and their unique health issues will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to become familiar with the features and scope of several Internet resources.

MedlinePlus and More

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Presenter:           Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Date / Time:       March 13th / 1:30 – 3 pm (ET)

Where:               Erie County Public Library, Admiral Room

Register:              http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=513

Summary: This course is designed to train librarians and consumers on MedlinePlus, the premier consumer health database by the National Library of Medicine. Hands-on exercises and real life problems will be used as a method of teaching this database. Additional consumer health resources from the National Library of Medicine will be selected and demonstrated based on needs of participants.

NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Winter Issue Available

Friday, February 20th, 2015

The Winter 2015 issue of NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine features information on healthy aging with Go4Life, living with Alzheimer’s disease, finding good health information on the Internet, atrial fibrillation, and treating alcohol problems. The cover features Howie Mandel, a host, performer, and producer, who was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib). He discusses his involvement with the National Stroke Association’s Fibs or Facts campaign that raises awareness about AFib and its increased risk for stroke.

The magazine also recaps the Science Pathfinders at NLM/NIH event on September 26, 2014, where more than 500 middle and high school students at public and private schools in Maryland and the District of Columbia visited the NIH campus in Bethesda to hear presentations from top scientists and medical doctors on the latest advances in medical research. This issue’s HealthLine describes the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and and the Pharmaceuticals division of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) small phase 1 clinical trial of the experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease.

NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is the free, trusted consumer guide to the vast array of authoritative online health and medical information at MedlinePlus. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) latest medical research and healthcare information. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine is freely available as a print subscription, e-mail alerts, and online.

METRO Webinar: Taking Ownership at Work

Friday, February 20th, 2015

No one wants to be micromanaged. We want to be trusted and given space in the workplace, even when we work as part of a team. Plenty of studies say that increasing employee responsibility and accountability through autonomy will improve both quality of work and employee satisfaction — a two-in-one proposition!

But what if our bosses simply aren’t buying into it? This is where independent ownership comes in.

There are lots of ways to exercise personal ownership on an individual level, no matter the circumstances. Proactive problem solving is one example. We’ve all had workplace conversations that turn into gripe sessions. Venting pent up frustrations feels good and can help us articulate exactly where the problem is. However, although we might feel stuck in the moment, there is almost always something we can do to solve the problem. Moving past frustration and onto an actionable next step is what we mean by “taking ownership.”

Having limited authority doesn’t need to short circuit our ability to be proactive. Take ownership over what you can. Innovate on a small scale and ask for what you need!

Of course, taking action to resolve issues in the workplace does carry some risk. Odds are that we’ll make at least one poor decision somewhere down the line. But forward steps bear so much more reward than standing still ever will.

Instructor Kimberly Sweetman will talk more about ownership, autonomy, and how to implement them during Library Professionals in the 21st Century Workplace at METRO on Monday, March 2nd.

Opportunity to Affect the Future of the National Library of Medicine

Friday, February 13th, 2015

You have a unique opportunity to affect the future of the National Library of Medicine. As Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg retires after 30 years as director of NLM, Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, has convened a “Working Group to Chart the Course for the NIH National Library of Medicine.” The group’s charge and members: http://www.nih.gov/about/director/02032015_working-group_nlm.htm.

Consider responding to this time-sensitive NIH Request for Information (RFI), soliciting input into the deliberations of the working group of the advisory committee to the NIH Director. This is a very important opportunity to contribute feedback of the value of the National Library of Medicine, and to directly influence the future of this organization.

Your response must be submitted electronically at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/rfi/rfi.cfm?ID=41, and will ONLY be accepted through March 13, 2015.

Please share this information with colleagues and friends who might wish to respond with thoughts about how the NLM, and especially the collections, programs, and resources, have contributed to their research, teaching, education, and professional development.

Active for Life: Healthy Programming Resources for Seniors (Boost Box session)

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Presenter:  Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Date / Time:  March 10th / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Wherehttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the growth in the number and percentage of older adults is unparalleled in the history of the U.S. As a result, libraries, as well as community and faith-based organizations, are seeing an increase in the number of elderly they assist. This session will provide an overview of freely available and reliable health information resources for use with seniors focusing on health topics. Examples of how the National Library of Medicine, and other reputable materials can be incorporated into healthy programming for seniors will also be discussed. Find out where to locate free publications, agencies, and even a ready-made presentation toolkit for an older adult health program. 1 MLA CE.

NIH News in Health Now Available

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Check out the February issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

  • Fixing Flawed Body Parts: Engineering New Tissues and Organs
    How can you mend a broken heart? Or repair a damaged liver, kidney, or knee? NIH-funded scientists are exploring innovative ways to fix faulty organs and tissues or even grow new ones. This type of research is called tissue engineering. Exciting advances continue to emerge in this fast-moving field.
  • Galled by the Gallbladder? Your Tiny, Hard-Working Digestive Organ
    Most of us give little thought to the gallbladder, a pear-sized organ that sits just under the liver and next to the pancreas. The gallbladder may not seem to do all that much. But if this small organ malfunctions, it can cause serious problems. Gallbladder disorders rank among the most common and costly of all digestive system diseases. By some estimates, up to 20 million Americans may have gallstones, the most common type of gallbladder disorder.
  • Many Older People Take Anti-Anxiety Meds Despite Risks
    Despite known risks, older people often take benzodiazepines, a class of drugs that helps treat anxiety and sleep problems. New research raises questions about why benzodiazepines are prescribed so often when safer alternatives may be available.
  • Treatment for Alcohol Problems
    An estimated 17 million Americans have an alcohol use disorder. But research suggests that only a fraction of them seek professional help. No matter how severe the problems may seem, most people can benefit from some form of therapy.
  • Featured Website: Find a Cancer Center
    NIH’s National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports specialized cancer research centers that deliver cutting-edge cancer treatments to people in communities across the country. This interactive map can help you find an NCI-designated center near you and learn about its patient services and research.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

Governor’s Guide to Mass Evacuations

Monday, February 9th, 2015

This guide was prepared to help governors and other state leaders prepare to play their roles in disaster response in advance of an emergency that involves mass evacuations. The guide covers important elements such as knowing the extent of authority, coordinating with nonprofits and volunteer organizations, establishing shelters, training, and reentry issueshttp://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/GovGuideMassEvacuation.pdf

Samuel Benson

Director of Emergency Management Operations

Emergency Management~Enterprise Resilience

NYU Langone Medical Center

Samuel.Benson@nyumc.org

Disaster Information Roles in Humanitarian Response

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Recently two blog posts were published on the various roles humanitarians play during disasters.  Both of these posts provide details of work done by humanitarians that make use of disaster information management skills.  One post includes an infographic that details the types of skills a humanitarian data scientist needs, such as data management, humanitarian business, information management and more.  This post ends with a link to free Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that corresponded to the skills listed in the infographic.

The second posts focused on the work digital humanitarians are doing in the response to the Ebola outbreak including verifying, updating and geo-tagging mapping data.  Take a few moments to read these blog posts, and consider how your skills fit with this work.