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Archive for the ‘Outreach’ Category

November is National Native American Heritage Month

Friday, November 14th, 2014

During November, the nation collectively recognizes the achievements, contributions and rich culture of the Native Americans.

History Native American Heritage Month was first recognized in 1915 with the annual meeting of the Congress of the American Indian Association, building upon previous work of Dr. Arthur C. Parker. Despite this proclamation, various states began organizing days of commemoration at different times of the year. It wasn’t until 1990 that a joint resolution from the White House was issued, designating November as National American Indian Heritage Month. Learn more about the history of Native American Heritage Month from the Library of Congress.

Health Concerns American Indians and Alaska Natives have a unique relationship with the federal government. Tribes exist as sovereign entities, but federally recognized tribes are entitled to health and educational services provided by the federal government. Though the Indian Health Service (IHS) is charged with serving the health needs of these populations, more than half of American Indians and Alaska Natives do not permanently reside on a reservation, and therefore have limited or no access to IHS services. Though often referred to as a singular group, American Indians and Alaska Natives represent diverse cultures, languages and customs unique to each community. Health challenges, however, have not been as unique with many Native American communities similarly experiencing the harsh impact of diabetes, HIV/AIDS, heart disease, stroke and infant mortality.

Profile: American Indian and Alaska Native Health Statistics by Disease Leading Causes of Death Other Critical Health Issues Find Journals and Publications Affordable Care Act and Native Americans The Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care law, was created to expand access to coverage, control health care costs, and improve health care quality and coordination. The ACA also includes permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act , which extends the current law and authorizes new programs and services within the Indian Health Service.

More about the Affordable Care Act and Native Americans Fact sheet: The ACA and American Indian and Alaska Native People

Our Work Delivery of health services and funding of programs to maintain and improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives are consonant with the federal government’s historical and unique legal relationship with Indian Tribes. In recognition of this, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) supports research on improving the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native Health Research Advisory Council (HRAC) American Indian/Alaska Native Health Disparities Program Grantees All grants and cooperative agreements American Indian/Alaska Native Tribal Initiative Awards (TIHA) Native Generations , an infant mortality awareness campaign Circle of Life , a multimedia HIV/AIDS/STI curriculum for Native youth National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services

Ways to Commemorate Native American Heritage Month

Educate yourself! Read up on the history of the Native people of the Americas and the creation of Native American History Month.

Raise awareness! Organize a community event to raise awareness about the health disparities that exist among Native American communities.

Get covered! Learn more about affordable health care options now available to you and your family and spread the word.

Share your story! How are you celebrating Native American Heritage Month? What’s happening in your organization or community? Share your story or tweet with us throughout the month.

From the Office of Minority Health

Jonas Salk, the Polio Vaccine, and the Shot Felt ‘Round the World

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Tuesday, November 18, at the New York Academy of Medicine

The event is free and open to the public; advance registration is requested. To register for this event: Jonas Salk, the Polio Vaccine, and The Shot Felt ‘Round the World

Jonas Salk, the Polio Vaccine, and the Shot Felt ‘Round the World

Jonas Salk’s vaccine against polio brought a fearful epidemic to a close. In the centennial year of Salk’s birth, we celebrate his achievement with the screening of The Shot Felt ’Round the World. This 2010 production chronicles Salk’s crucial work at the University of Pittsburgh that led to the polio vaccine’s success in the 1950s.

Produced by Stephanie Dangel Reiter, Carl Kurlander, and Laura Davis, and directed by Tjardus Greidanus, the hour-long documentary starts with the March of Dimes, a charity founded by President Franklin Roosevelt, himself paralyzed by the disease. March of Dimes’ sponsorship helped Salk develop his vaccine in the early 1950s. Public concern over the disease was so great that widespread testing started almost immediately. The vaccine was pronounced safe in 1955, with mass vaccination following. By the 1960s, polio in the United States was largely under control; the last known endemic case was in 1979.

The film not only looks at the well-known battle against polio, but also delves into the hidden stories, both of the researchers and of the sufferers. After the screening, we are pleased to welcome three commentators for a discussion of the film: Peter L. Salk, MD, president of the Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation and son of Jonas Salk; Jeffrey Kluger, senior correspondent for Time magazine and author of Splendid Solution: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio; and Bert Hansen, PhD, professor of the history of science and medicine at Baruch College and author of Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio.

About the Speakers

Bert Hansen, PhD, is professor of history at Baruch College of City University of New York, following appointments at Binghamton University (SUNY), New York University, and the University of Toronto. His recent book, Picturing Medical Progress from Pasteur to Polio: A History of Mass Media Images and Popular Attitudes in America, was honored with awards from the Popular Culture Association and the American Library Association. The book argues that the triumphs of Louis Pasteur in 1885 and Jonas Salk in 1955 bookend a glorious period of unalloyed popular enthusiasm for medical advances that didn’t sustain itself much beyond the 1950s. The Salk vaccine marked the end of one era in popular sentiments and the beginning of another.

Jeffrey Kluger is the science editor for Time magazine and Time.com, principally covering science and social issues. His newest nonfiction book is The Narcissist Next Door: Understanding the Monster in Your Family, in Your Office, in Your Bed—In Your World, published in September 2014. His most recent novel was Freedom Stone, a young adult tale set on a South Carolina plantation in 1863, published in 2011. He is the author of seven other books, including Apollo 13 (1994), coauthored with Jim Lovell, which served as the basis of the 1995 movie; and Splendid Solution: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio (2004). His 2001 cover story on global warming for Time won the Overseas Press Club Award for best environmental reporting of the year.

Kluger has worked at Discover magazine, Family Circle, The New York Times Business World, and Science Digest. His work has appeared in dozens of publications, including The New York Times Magazine, Gentlemen’s Quarterly, The Wall Street Journal, Cosmopolitan, Omni, McCall’s, New York Magazine, The New York Post, Newsday, and, of course, Time. He has been an adjunct instructor in the graduate journalism program at New York University; is a licensed attorney; and is a graduate of the University of Maryland and the University of Baltimore, School of Law.

Peter L. Salk, MD, is president of the Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation and son of Jonas Salk. Dr. Salk graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard University in 1965 and Alpha Omega Alpha from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1969. Following two years of house staff training in internal medicine at the University Hospitals of Cleveland, he worked in his father’s laboratory at the Salk Institute from 1972 to 1984, conducting research on immunotherapy of cancer, autoimmune disease, and strategies for vaccine production. He worked again with his father from 1991 to 1995 on a project to develop an inactivated vaccine for HIV infection, and subsequently worked on the introduction of AIDS treatment programs in Africa and Asia. He is currently President of the Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation, where he is devoting attention to the effort to complete the eradication of polio, organizing and making available the extensive collections of his father’s papers and historical materials, educating the public regarding his father’s life and work, and extending and applying his father’s vision to help address humanity’s present challenges and opportunities.

We look forward to seeing you at this and other events in the 2014–2015 series. For more information about many other upcoming history of medicine events in the New York area, see the calendar page of our blog, Books, Health, and History: http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/calendar/.

Articles of Interest from Journal of Hospital Librarianship

Friday, November 14th, 2014

You may have seen that these articles are freely available from the Journal of Hospital Librarianship.  They describe new ways hospital librarians can market their services to their hospital community.

Christine Monie & Jessica Clark (2013) Promoting the Library through an Electronic Table of Contents (e-TOC) E-mail Service: The Wollongong Experience, Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 13:1, 32-41.  This article discusses taking the initiative to reach out to members of your constituent groups to “help and supply” instead of waiting for a request for a service.

Jennifer E. Moyer (2013) Managing Mobile Devices in Hospitals: A Literature Review of BYOD Policies and Usage, Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 13:3, 197-208.  The authors discuss how the hospital librarian can become an essential collaborator in managing mobile devices in the institution including training and content support.

New Interactive Tool Identify Underserved Patient Care Areas

Friday, November 14th, 2014

The American Medical Association (AMA) has announced a resource to help healthcare providers improve patient access to care. The Health Workforce Mapper is an interactive tool that illustrates the geographic locations of the health care work force in each state, including health professional shortage areas, hospital locations, and other related workforce trends.

The tool is designed to highlight areas where the number of health care professionals could be expanded to enhance patient access to timely, quality care close to home. It can also assist policy makers to make evidence-based decisions. Non-members of the AMA can view a version of the tool: http://bit.ly/1udJooM.

PA Forward: Libraries Create Healthier Pennsylvania Communities (Lunch with the RML session)

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Presenter:  Kathy Silks, Project Manager, PA Forward | Pennsylvania Libraries / Pennsylvania Library Association

Date / Time:  Thursday, November 20, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Wherehttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/lunch2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary:     This webinar will introduce PA Forward | Pennsylvania Libraries, an action plan designed to communicate libraries’ essential role in preparing citizens to meet the demands of life.  Libraries can help solve some of our society’s biggest economic and social challenges, and that includes the health of our citizens.  Research shows that nothing – not age, income, employment status, education level, or racial and ethnic background – affects health status more than literacy skills.  Through print and online resources, public programs, community outreach services, and on-staff information experts, libraries help people learn healthy habits, make healthier decisions, and actively manage their own and their family’s well-being.

We will share information about PA Forward’s focus on health literacy and four other essential literacies, its partnerships with eight statewide healthcare organizations, and the high-tech and high-touch ways libraries link citizens of all ages to the most reliable information available to help them prevent disease and manage their health.

Helpful Ebola Information

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Free Ebola PPE Training

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Next week is the New Jersey State Conference on EMS in Atlantic City, NJ.

During the pre-conference, they are offering a free Ebola Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Training Course:

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 

This two-hour course is intended to train emergency medical services personnel in the proper utilization of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when responding to suspect cases of Ebola.  This session will be offered twice at the times below (choose one to attend):

  • Session 1 / 1:30 – 3:30 pm
  • Session 2 / 3:30 – 5:30 pm

NOTE that there is a 50 person limit for each session.  The training is free; however, you must be pre-registered for the training to be admitted. 

Register:  CLICK HERE

For more information, download the complete Conference brochure: www.NJEMSConference.com

NLM’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) Rebranded as HealthReach

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

The National Library of Medicine’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) resource was a national collaborative partnership with the principal focus of creating and making available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees. In October 2014, NLM’s Specialized Information Services (SIS) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach.

This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations. Over the next several months new resources will be added to the website. There is also a new Twitter feed, @NLM_HealthReach. There isn’t much change between the old RHIN and the new HealthReach; this was intentional to help with the continuity of service through the transition.

New York Public Radio and The New York Academy of Medicine Recapture a Piece of American Medical and Broadcast History

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

New York Public Radio and The New York Academy of Medicine Recapture a Piece of American Medical and Broadcast History

Launch Digital Archive of 1950s Radio Broadcasts on Health and Medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and New York Public Radio (NYPR) have digitized and released a treasure trove of 1950s WNYC radio broadcasts that feature significant voices from the past and provide a unique view of the medical and health concerns of American in the 1950s. The broadcasts brought lectures from the groundbreaking NYAM series Lectures to the Laity and For Doctors Only out of the halls of the Academy to a broad public audience, offering a new form of access to timely discussions on medicine, health, and culture.

The 40 digitized lectures and talks are part of a collaboration between NYAM and WNYC, which was then owned and operated by the city. Highlights include talks featuring Leona Baumgartner, New York City’s first woman health commissioner; cancer pioneer Sydney Farber; American microbiologist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author René Dubos; acclaimed anthropologist and social critic Margaret Mead; Norbert Wiener, father of cybernetics; and discussion of the Freud Centenary and Lincoln’s doctors.

“NYAM’s innovative partnership with WNYC in the 1950s brought important medical discussions out of the Academy’s rooms and into the public’s living rooms,” said Lisa O’Sullivan, PhD, Director of the NYAM Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health. “Today, NYAM remains committed to making the history of medicine accessible to broad public audiences, and we are extremely pleased to partner with New York Public Radio to release this digital collection.”

“The combination of expertise has made for a project with perfect synergy,” said Andy Lanset, Director of Archives, New York Public Radio. “We’re thrilled to make such important recordings available to both the scientific/medical community, and the public at large.”

These lectures are drawn from the more than 1,500 original lacquer discs transferred from NYAM to the NYPR Archives in 2008. The digitization and cataloging resulted from a joint project between NYAM’s Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health and the NYPR Archives, with a grant from METRO, the New York Metropolitan Library Council.

NYAM and WNYC began their radio relationship in 1946 with the launch of The Laity Lectures, later to become Lectures to the Laity, a popular series of Academy lectures and talks on culture and medicine that had started in 1935. By mid-1950, this series was joined by For Doctors Only, which aimed to bring “the best of the meetings, conferences, roundtable discussions held at the academy” to the medical profession. On its debut broadcast of July 27, 1950, The New York Times called it “an epochal advance in the educational use of radio.” The New York World-Telegram and Sun referred to it as a “bold venture” and “enterprising” in the interest of good health for millions of people. For Doctors Only also addressed critical analysis of issues of society and medicine, as well as the application of the social sciences to medicine, and provided academic presentations in the history of medicine.

The lectures are available on WNYC’s website. Individual titles are also available through NYAM’s library catalog.

Paul Theerman, PhD

Associate Director

Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health

New York Academy of Medicine

1216 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY, 10029

212.822.7350

http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/

Ebola Videos in American Sign Language

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

NNLM friends,

Today we published our Ebola videos in American Sign Language (based on information provided by the CDC) that we created in partnership with the Ohio State University.  Would you be interested in helping us spread this information to the hospitals and medical libraries in your regions (as well as to other NN/LM regions).  Hospitals and medical libraries can contact Jeff Wolfe (Jeff@DeafHealth.org) with any questions.

The website is: DeafHealth.org/diseases/ebola

Thank you,

Casey Davis

Founder, www.DeafHealth.org