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Archive for the ‘Open Access’ Category

NISO Launches Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) Standing Committee

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

NISO Launches Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) Standing Committee

Comments and suggestions welcome for maintenance and promotion of the recommended practice

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is pleased to announce the next phase for the Open Discovery Initiative, a project that explores community interactions in the realm of indexed discovery services. Following the working group’s recommendation to create an ongoing standing committee as outlined in the published recommended practice, Open Discovery Initiative: Promoting Transparency in Discovery (NISO RP-19-2014), NISO has formed a new standing committee reflecting a balance of stakeholders, with member representation from content providers, discovery providers, and libraries. The ODI Standing Committee will promote education about adoption of the ODI Recommended Practice, provide support for content providers and discovery providers during adoption, conduct a forum for ongoing discussion related to all aspects of discovery platforms for all stakeholders, and determine timing for additional actions that were outlined in the recommended practice.

“Discovery systems are critical to the research ecosystem,” states Laura Morse, ODI Standing Committee Co-chair and Director, Library Systems, Harvard University. “Working with content and discovery providers to ensure that all content, whether it is licensed or openly available, can be discovered by library users regardless of the institution’s choice of discovery system is core to supporting research, teaching, and learning. The ODI Standing Committee will build on the work of the original ODI Working Group to promote content neutrality and the widespread adoption of all tenets of the recommended practice by discovery service providers, content providers, and libraries.”

“The ODI Recommended Practice provides a rich framework within which content providers and discovery service suppliers can drive collaborative improvements toward a smooth and comprehensive library search experience,” states Lettie Conrad, ODI Standing Committee Co-chair and Executive Manager, Online Products, SAGE. “We must work together across the industry to fully realize the vision of indexed discovery services, which is made possible by NISO’s leadership and guidance through the standards formation process. The Standing Committee invites suggestions from the community on how we can best promote and enable adoption of the NISO ODI Recommended Practice.”

“Uptake of NISO’s recommendations is always aided when community members are willing to continue working together as a Standing Committee,” explains Nettie Lagace, Associate Director for Programs at NISO. “ As stakeholders utilize the NISO documents and discuss potential areas of further work, the benefits of relying on a group of their peers to educate them and provide support cannot be underestimated. NISO is grateful to the members of the Standing Committee for contributing their time to these ongoing efforts.”

More information about the ODI Standing Committee and the Open Discovery Initiative: Promoting Transparency in Discovery (NISO RP-19-2014) recommended practice are available from the Open Discovery Initiative webpage on the NISO website at: www.niso.org/workrooms/odi/. You may join the ODI Interest Group e-mail list at: www.niso.org/lists/opendiscovery/. To provide input on promotion, adoption, and maintenance of the recommended practice, send an e-mail to odi@niso.org.

Cynthia Hodgson
Technical Editor / Consultant
National Information Standards Organization
chodgson@niso.org
301-654-2512

A Partial Win for Publishers

Monday, October 27th, 2014

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/10/20/federal-appeals-court-rejects-georgia-state-us-10-percent-rule-determining-fair-use

National Library of Medicine Joins the Commons on Flickr!

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The National Library of Medicine has announced that it is now a participating institution of the Commons on Flickr. The Commons on Flickr was launched in 2008 as a pilot project in partnership with the Library of Congress in order to increase access to publicly-held photography collections and to invite the general public to provide information about the collections. The National Library of Medicine now joins a distinguished, international group of nearly one hundred cultural institutions in providing greater access to its collection and inviting public use of and engagement with these images held in the public trust through The Commons on Flickr.

Images from the historical collections of the History of Medicine Division, including public health posters, book illustrations, photographs, fine art work, and ephemera, have always been available through the Images from the History of Medicine database, which includes over 70,000 images illustrating the social and historical aspects of medicine dated from the 15th to the 21st century. Now, they can also be accessed through the Commons on Flickr via a photostream, where visitors can contribute information about the images by adding comments and tags. By adding a new way to see its collections through Flickr NLM hopes to learn more details about its collections, create dialog about its holdings, and share knowledge with the public. The collection of images on Flickr will continue to grow so visitors can check back regularly for new content!

My NCBI – ORCID Author Data Integration with SciENcv

Friday, September 26th, 2014

SciENcv users will soon be able to create SciENcv profiles using the data stored in their ORCID records. By linking an ORCID account to an NCBI account, users will be able to create SciENcv profiles using the personal statement, education, employment, publications and research awards information stored in ORCID records.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_sciencv_orcid.html

NIH Public Access Policy Webinar Series: Recordings Available!

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

If you missed last month’s webinar series on the NIH Public Access Policy, session recordings are now available for viewing!

The NIH Public Access Policy – Information for Librarians held Tuesday, August 19. Session recording available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKTv1Wczv3o&feature=youtu.be.

The NIH Public Access Policy – Views from the Library Trenches held Tuesday, August 26. Session recording available at http://nnlm.gov/sea/services/webconf/otherwebinar/08262014.html.

NISO September Virtual Conference: Library Data in the Cloud

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

Virtual conferences are 5-6 hour conferences held online in webinar-like formats, with occasional breaks in the schedule for participants. The longer length allows the depth of coverage of a conference coupled with the convenience of a webinar.

Date: September 24, 2014

Time: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm Eastern

Event webpage: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2014/virtual/data_in_the_cloud/

ABOUT THE VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

Cloud computing seems to be a growing trend, no matter the industry or type of information system. Library systems are no stranger to this trend; just about every major systems provider has a cloud-based solution available. While many factors for selecting a cloud system are similar to those for any information system decision, there are some special issues and challenges for storing your data in the cloud, including security, privacy, ownership, interoperability, and transferability.

In NISO’s September 24 virtual conference, Library Data in the Cloud—to be held from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm EDT—libraries that have explored the use of cloud systems will discuss their experiences, their concerns, issues encountered, and lessons learned.

TOPICS AND SPEAKERS

Keynote Speaker – Rick McMullen, PhD, Director of the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center and Research Professor of Computer Science and Computer Engineering, University of Arkansas

Integrated Library Systems Moving to the Cloud – Joseph R. Matthews, author and library consultant

Big Data Processing in the Cloud: a Hydra/Sufia Experience – Zhiwu Xie, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Technology Development Librarian, Center for Digital Research and Scholarship University Libraries, Virginia Tech

Cloud Computing in Library Instruction – Laura Fargo McKinnon, JD, MLIS, Department Head, Research & Instructional Services, University of North Texas Libraries and Kris Helge, Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of North Texas Libraries

Data Publication and Sharing with Globus – Steve Tuecke, Deputy Director, Computation Institute, University of Chicago; Co-Founder of the Globus Project

eResource Management in the Cloud – Jeffrey D. Kuskie, Electronic Resource Manager, Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Security and Data Ownership in the Cloud – Andrew K. Pace, Executive Director, Networked Library Services, OCLC; Councilor-at-large, American Library Association

Privacy in the Cloud – Speaker TBA

Conference Roundtable – Discussion with speakers and Q&A

REGISTRATION

Registration is per site (access for one computer) and closes at 4:00 pm Eastern on September 24, 2014 (the day before the virtual conference). Discounts are available for NISO members and students. All virtual conference registrants receive access to the recorded version for one year.

Can’t make it on the day of the virtual conference? All registrants receive access to the recorded version for one year. Take advantage of the Virtual Conference subscription package (www.niso.org/news/events/2014/virtual/#subscription) for all six of the 2014 Virtual Conferences and save 33%. (Previously held 2014 virtual conferences available in recorded versions.)

For more information and to register, visit the event webpage: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2014/virtual/data_in_the_cloud/

Archive Available for Adding to Your Teaching Toolbox

Sunday, September 21st, 2014

Archive now available: http://nnlm.gov/mar/training/boost_recordings.html

Presenters:

  • Sharon Dennis, Assistant Director, NN/LM National Training Center (NTC)
  • Rebecca Brown, Trainer, NN/LM National Training Center (NTC)
  • Jessi Van Der Volgen, Trainer, NN/LM National Training Center (NTC)

Summary:  Three trainers from the National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC) will present a few our favorite teaching tips and techniques for both in-person and online classes.   Sharon Dennis will discuss possibilities for applying “gamification” principles as a tool to motivate class participants.  Jessi Van Der Volgen will share four strategies for adding meaningful interaction to your online or in-person classes, and examples of each.  Rebecca Brown will share free tools you can use to develop a class and a social media alternative to a course discussion board.

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Library Journal and School Library Journal invite you to participate in our 5th annual, online conference:

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

<http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/>.

 

This free event provide answers to some of the biggest challenges libraries face in the transformation of our culture from analog experiences to digital experiences. This daylong professional development conference can be viewed in groups or privately. There are no travel or registration fees, and attendees will connect with each other as well as hear exciting keynotes from award-winning scientist and NY Times Best Selling author author Daniel J. Levitin, PhD (Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in an Age of Information Overload) , and Anil Dash, cofounder and CEO of ThinkUp <https://www.thinkup.com/>, that will examine our shared digital future.

 

Our lineup of expert speakers and panelists will present innovative tools and ideas for and from libraries of all types. The day features different tracks dedicated to K-12, Academic, and Public, allowing for the day to be completely customizable. The day will focus on three key areas:

 

  • Content, Containers and Beyond
  • How libraries are creating, curating, and licensing, digitizing, archiving, and delivering content in today’s fast-changing digital world.
  • Collaboration and Innovation
  • How libraries are repositioning themselves as the digital nexus for theircommunities.
  • Leading the Learning Revolution
  • How libraries serve as essential links in a learning continuum.

 

Libraries @ the Center (#TDS14) <http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/> includes sessions on:

 

  • StatBase: Open source data management for libraries

 

  • Partnering with Small Organizations to Digitize Local Content

 

  • Bridging the K12-College Information Literacy Gap

 

  • Digital Strategies for Job Search Training

 

  • Hack Your Notebook: Leveraging Libraries for STEM-Literacy
  • Connections

 

  • Identifying and Delivering Meta-Literacy Skill Sets to Adult
  • Learners

 

  • Making Space for Play

 

More information is available online at http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/.

The Value Study as a Tool for Library Advocacy (Boost Box session)

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Presenters:

  • Joanne Gard Marshall, Distinguished Research Professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Julia Sollenberger, Associate Vice President and Director, Medical Center Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center

Date / Time: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:             https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary: The speakers will present the results of the Value Study the most useful for library advocacy and discuss how results are being used by librarians across the country. Over 16,000 physicians, residents and nurses served by 56 libraries participated in the study. As a result, the findings can be used by both participating and non-participating libraries.

Librarians are using the results to advocate for the importance of the library through posters, presentations, newsletters and personal contacts with administrators, educators and clinicians. Time saved by health professionals is also being also converted into dollars saved to show cost-effectiveness. Our examples show that librarians are using the results, but customizing their advocacy efforts so that they have maximum impact on their institution.

Librarians are making frequent use of the resources available on the Value Study website: http://nnlm.gov/mar/about/value.html, containing an overview of the study results suitable for presentation. Librarians are welcome to use the full presentation or key slides as needed.  Specialized PowerPoint summary reports are also available based on geographic region, as well as AAHSL and non-AAHSL sites, and the profession of respondents. The site provides access to the data and all supporting materials, including the survey. Features encourage data use, benchmarking with similar types of libraries, as well as study replication. Links to peer reviewed journal articles based on the study results are also available on the site. Two new publications, one in a nursing journal and one in a health care management journal are about to appear. Results from these additional analyses will be discussed.

NTIS Reports of Possible Interest

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values.

Report produced in 2014 by the Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

A White House report on big data released May 1 concludes that the explosion of data in today’s world can be an unprecedented driver of social progress, but it also has the potential to eclipse basic civil rights and privacy protections. The report drew praise from business and technology groups for its grasp of how big data analytics could improve education and healthcare, uncover wasteful government spending, and help with the nation’s continuing economic recovery. But those same groups cautioned that government attempts to regulate data collection could interfere with productivity and job growth.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis.

Report produced in 2013 by the National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Mathematical Sciences.

Experiments, observations, and numerical simulations in many areas of science and business are currently generating terabytes of data, and in some cases are on the verge of generating petabytes and beyond. Analyses of the information contained in these data sets have already led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from genomics to astronomy and high-energy physics and to the development of new information-based industries. Traditional methods of analysis have been based largely on the assumption that analysts can work with data within the confines of their own computing environment, but the growth of big data is changing that paradigm, especially in cases in which massive amounts of data are distributed across locations. While the scientific community and the defense enterprise have long been leaders in generating and using large data sets, the emergence of e-commerce and massive search engines has led other sectors to confront the challenges of massive data.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Data Mining Meets HCI: Making Sense of Large Graphs.

Report produced in 2012 by Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Machine Learning Department.

We have entered the age of big data. Massive datasets are now common in science, government and enterprises. Yet, making sense of these data remains a fundamental challenge. Where do we start our analysis. Where to go next. How to visualize our findings. We answers these questions by bridging Data Mining and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to create tools for making sense of graphs with billions of nodes and edges, focusing on (1) Attention Routing: we introduce this idea, based on anomaly detection, that automatically draws people’s attention to interesting areas of the graph to start their analyses. We present three examples Polonium unearths malware from 37 billion machine- file relationships NetProbe fingers bad guys who commit auction fraud. (2) Mixed-Initiative Sensemaking: we present two examples that combine machine inference and visualization to help users locate next areas of interest: Apolo guides users to explore large graphs by learning from few examples of user interest; Graphite finds interesting subgraphs, based on only fuzzy descriptions drawn graphically. (3) Scaling Up: we show how to enable interactive analytics of large graphs by leveraging Hadoop, staging of operations, and approximate computation. This thesis contributes to data mining, HCI, and importantly their intersection, including: interactive systems and algorithms that scale theories that unify graph mining approaches; and paradigms that overcome fundamental challenges in visual analytics. Our work is making impact to academia and society: Polonium protects 120 million people worldwide from malware; NetProbe made headlines on CNN, WSJ and USA Today; Pegasus won an open source software award; Apolo helps DARPA detect insider threats and prevent exfiltration. We hope our Big Data Mantra ‘Machine for Attention Routing Human for Interaction’ will inspire more innovations at the crossroad of data mining and HCI.

 

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here