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Archive for the ‘Open Access’ Category

Awardee Reports (Lunch with the RML session)

Friday, April 17th, 2015


Project: Development of a Service for NIH Public Access Compliance

Awardee: NYU Health Sciences Libraries, New York, NY

Description:  In response to the policy change and the amount of articles not in compliance, the NYU Health Sciences Libraries will partner with the NYU Langone Medical Center’s Office of Science and Research (OSR) to develop a service that will:

  • Educate researchers on the NIH Public Access Policy.
  • Notify researchers when a publication associated with their grant award has not been successfully deposited into PubMed Central digital archive.
  • Assist researchers in submitting their peer-reviewed manuscript into PubMed Central.
  • Meet and discuss with scientific journal publishers best practices for submitting peer-reviewed manuscripts on the researcher or author’s behalf.

Project: Assessing the Health Information Needs of the Madison County Rural Health Council

Awardee:  Central New York Library Resources Council, Syracuse, NY

Description:  With this project, the Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC) will work with the Madison County (NY) Rural Health Council to determine their information needs and develop a relationship with the organization. This is a preliminary project which will hopefully lead to further engagement with this organization. The Madison County Rural Health Council is a relatively new organization of stakeholders from Madison County which was formed to “catalyze information sharing, access to healthcare and linkages among providers to improve the health of the people in Central New York.” Representatives on the Council include Madison County Mental Health, Madison County Office for the Aging, Madison County Public Health, Community Memorial Hospital, Oneida Healthcare, the Community Action Program, and Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

Project:  Capital District Hospital Library Catalogs Technology Improvement Project Proposal

Awardee:  Capital District Library Council (CDLC), Albany, NY

Description:  The Capital District Library Council (CDLC) will purchase and implement web-based public access online library catalogs for 11 hospital libraries that are members of CDLC’s Hospital Library Service Program.  CDLC will also create a new union catalog of 11 hospital libraries.  Making these catalogs and their holdings available online will provide faster and more efficient access to library health and medical information resource holdings.  Efficient access to information will improve the provision of healthcare to the patients and clientele of these member hospitals.

Date / Time:  April 30th / Noon – 1 pm (ET)


Online / No Registration Required

New NIH BD2K Funding Opportunity

Saturday, March 28th, 2015

A new Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) funding opportunity is available, Supplements to Support Interoperability of NIH Funded Biomedical Data Repositories, with an April 20 application due date. NIH is accepting administrative supplement requests to support projects that will establish or improve interoperability among NIH funded biomedical data repositories. Improved interoperability is expected to lead to increased efficiency of repositories’ operations and cost reductions, which are significant factors of the NIH’s long-term sustainability plans for the biomedical data repositories. Each supplement request should be associated to a collaborative project consisting of a biomedical data repository supported by an active NIH-funded parent grant, and one or more collaborating sites that together implement the interoperability goals of this FOA. The collaborating sites may be other biomedical data repositories, or may provide computational tools and data standards, or perform other activities that facilitate interoperability among data repositories. Supplement requests will only be accepted from active NIH-funded parent grants that primarily support biomedical data repositories with an overall annual budget above $500,000 in direct costs.

Valentina di Francesca (NHGRI) will be organizing an administrative review panel for these supplements as a group. Administrative review is expected to occur in May 2015, and completed by August 24, 2015. Awards are expected to be made in August/September 2015.

MAR and SE/A Medical Librarians Invited to Participate in Spring 2015 Group Licensing Offer

Saturday, March 21st, 2015

PRINCETON, NJ (MARCH 13, 2015)—All medical librarians in the MAR and SE/A Regions are invited to participate in the Group Licensing Initiative (GLI), formed under the umbrella organization Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ), through their Spring 2015 Offer.  Nearly 500 resources from 11 vendors will be available through the Offer, and at a cost savings of 15-70% off regular pricing, through the leveraging of group purchasing power.

The Spring Offer is now available.  To receive a copy of the Offer, please contact Robert Mackes at (570) 856-5952 or

Group Licensing is a creative solution to the escalating cost of high-quality electronic resources—medical journals, books and databases.  More than 120 hospitals and medical facilities regularly participate in the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative, known as the first consortium of its kind in the nation.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (MAR), and Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A) fully recognize and endorse the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative as the lead organization capable of assisting libraries in their efforts to utilize multi-dimensional electronic resources.

Managed by medical librarian and HSLANJ Executive Director Robert Mackes, MLS, AHIP, the GLI is guided by a committee comprised of librarians from different-sized health facilities in the regions served.  Feel  free to contact Robert about scheduling a meeting or presentation about the GLI, at your next chapter, state organization, or local consortium meeting.

The deadline to participate in the Spring Offer is Friday, April 24.  Check the HSLANJ Facebook page for links to blog articles, previewing vendors’ new resources available through the Spring Offer:

The HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative is funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00003-C with the University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Library System.  This project is also funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland Baltimore.

HHS Expands Its Approach to Making Research Results Freely Available for the Public

Friday, March 13th, 2015

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) took a giant step forward in enabling the public to obtain results of government-funded research.  HHS released a comprehensive set of plans outlining how its agencies will expand access to the results of scientific research for the public.  These plans were developed in response to a White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) memorandum that directed federal research agencies to increase access to peer-reviewed scientific publications and digital data developed by researchers.

Within HHS, five of the largest research funding agencies developed plans in accordance with HHS’s common approach to Public Access: National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR).  These plans build on our existing Open Government goals of increasing transparency, collaboration and participation, and lowering barriers to accessing health information.

Our plans expand upon an NIH requirement that investigators make any peer-reviewed publications resulting from their NIH-funded research available to the public within 12 months of publication.  The centerpiece of the effort is PubMed Central (PMC), a free full-text archive of the biomedical and life sciences journal literature, supported by the National Library of Medicine.

HHS’ Public Access Plan Details 

HHS’s public access plans are expanding access to research results in two key domains: peer-reviewed publications and digital data.

Peer-reviewed Publications – We are expanding the types of peer-reviewed articles that will be required to be deposited into PMC.  Researchers funded by NIH, CDC, FDA, AHRQ and ASPR will be required to submit their publications into PMC within 12 months of their publication.  The addition of these agencies will increase the corpus of available research to include new topics such as: comparative effectiveness, emergency preparedness, public health, environmental health, and toxicological research.

Digital Data – We are also requiring that the data produced by researchers be made publically accessible in a digital format.  At a minimum, the data underlying publications will need to be available at the time of publication.  As part of this effort, our agencies will require that investigators submit data management plans outlining how their data will be managed and shared as part of their initial research proposals.[1]

View HHS’s public access plans.

Impact of Greater Access to Health Information

Given that health information is one of the most highly sought after types of information on the web, the impact of successful implementation of our public access plans is likely to be significant.  We anticipate our public access efforts will augment the over 3 million papers that are currently available to the public through PMC.  Our requirements will add to this repository an estimated 110,000 peer-reviewed scholarly articles authored by HHS-funded researchers each year.  This is just the tip of the iceberg.  As a result of the partnerships we have established with many of the leading scientific publishers, additional journal articles are being voluntarily added to PMC.  As the contents of PMC grow and diversify, we anticipate that it will create yet more opportunities for new connections to be made among disparate fields of scientific inquiry, and new types of knowledge and insights that can benefit health and healthcare. We expect it will allow for faster dissemination of research results into products, services and clinical practices that can improve healthcare.

We expect the new requirements for data sharing will be highly impactful, not only in terms of follow-on research that can be enabled, but also for ensuring the integrity of the scientific enterprise through allowing others to confirm the reproducibility of any published experiment. By ensuring that all publicly released research data is provided in open, machine-readable formats that can easily be accessed for computational analysis and machine-learning, it is our hope that we can help realize the promise of ‘big data’ in medicine and healthcare.

Next Steps for Public Access 

A major focus over the coming year will be the policy development processes necessary to turn these plans into practice.  Several agencies, such as FDA, AHRQ and ASPR, will be developing public access policies for the first time.  Other agencies, such as NIH and CDC, will be updating existing policies.  In parallel with the policy development efforts, we will be working to integrate new partners into PMC, which will include new segments of the publishing and research communities.

Over the next year, we will continue our efforts to explore how we can develop the infrastructure necessary to support  data linkages across HHS, and facilitate the public’s ability to locate and access data published by our funded researchers.  Outreach and communications to our partners, both internal and external, will be critical to the success of our public access efforts.  We look forward to working together with all of the stakeholders to increase the usability of health research funded by HHS, and to creating an information ecosystem that will catalyze improvements in health and healthcare for all Americans.

The Diversity of Data Management: Practical Approaches for Health Sciences Librarianship

Friday, March 6th, 2015

MLA is offering a webcast on data management on April 22.  The program, “The Diversity of Data Management: Practical Approaches for Health Sciences Librarianship,” will have Lisa Federer, AHIP, Kevin Read, and Jacqueline Wirz present strategies and success stories for data management.

More information on the program and speakers can be found on MLANET.

Because we work closely with many of you to offer these programs to your RML members, we wanted to announce the webcast early.   This way you will be able to coordinate sites, purchase group and individual registrations, and plan your education budgets.  The member site rate is $399.  Also, there is a multi-site discount, see below:

Multiple Site Rate: $370 (2-10 sites) / $350 (11-35 sites) / $320 (36-50 sites) / $300: (51+sites)

NCBI Webinar: The Next Generation of Access to Sequencing Data

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Next Wednesday, February 25, NCBI staff will present a webinar on the SRA Toolkit, a system for accessing the approximately 3.4 Petabases of next-generation genomic and expressed sequence data housed in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA). As data sets become larger, mining information and performing comparisons directly from structured databases becomes increasingly necessary. The SRA Toolkit is not only capable of dumping the data out as a fastq or sam file, but also provides direct analysis and comparison from specific genomics regions across hundreds or thousands of samples.

In the webinar, we will show examples of configuration and use of the Toolkit for both public SRA and controlled access data associated with studies in the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP).

To register for this webinar:

Opportunity to Affect the Future of the National Library of Medicine

Friday, February 13th, 2015

You have a unique opportunity to affect the future of the National Library of Medicine. As Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg retires after 30 years as director of NLM, Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, has convened a “Working Group to Chart the Course for the NIH National Library of Medicine.” The group’s charge and members:

Consider responding to this time-sensitive NIH Request for Information (RFI), soliciting input into the deliberations of the working group of the advisory committee to the NIH Director. This is a very important opportunity to contribute feedback of the value of the National Library of Medicine, and to directly influence the future of this organization.

Your response must be submitted electronically at, and will ONLY be accepted through March 13, 2015.

Please share this information with colleagues and friends who might wish to respond with thoughts about how the NLM, and especially the collections, programs, and resources, have contributed to their research, teaching, education, and professional development.

AHRQ and NASA Release Their Public Access Plans

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Both AHRQ and NASA have released their public access plans (response to the “OSTP Memo”). Both intend to use PMC as a repository for publications written by investigators/researchers they fund.

Links to their plans are below. The HHS plan (which will include NIH) should be released very soon.



Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

Friday, February 13th, 2015

NISO Two-Part March Webinar: Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

Part 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content

Date: March 11, 2015

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Eastern time

Event webpage:


Part 2:  The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery

Date: March 18, 2015

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Eastern time

Event webpage:


NISO will be holding a two-part webinar on March 11 and 18 to explore the question, Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

The rise of the Discovery System in the library world has helped to streamline searching for end users by providing them with search functionality that more closely resembles search engines like Google than traditional database searches. But with this streamlined search comes added expectations from users about their ability to drill down into content and retrieve more granular pieces of information—anything from book chapters and individual letters to the editor to specific graphs and images could conceivably be retrieved in a more granular search.

Users are beginning to expect more granular search and access in Discovery System searches — encyclopedia articles, images, tables, book chapters. The implications for discovery system providers, content providers, and libraries to realize this vision are significant. These granular “objects” each have to be retrievable separately from the parent object and each has to have its own metadata and indexing. What is needed to ensure that discovery systems can retrieve and display information below the publication or article level? What is the role of the content provider and the library in this scenario? How do libraries help end users find and use this content?

This two-part NISO Webinar for March will examine the many implications of an increasingly granular discovery environment.

ABOUT PART 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content

In Part 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content, this webinar will discuss the implications of granular content for user search interfaces and discovery engines.

Topics and speakers are:

  • Working with Metadata Challenges to Support Granular Levels of Access and Descriptions – Myung-Ja Han, Assistant Professor/Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois
  • How Discovery Services are Meeting Evolving Granular Discovery User Needs – Tito Sierra, Director of Product Management, EBSCO Information Services

ABOUT PART 2: The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery

Part 2 will look at The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery, and presenters will discuss the implications of granular content​ discovery for the business side of the equation.

Topics and speakers are:

  • Enabling discoverability into specific segments of multimedia– Andrea Eastman-Mullins, Chief Operating Officer, Alexander Street Press
  • The Business side of Making Granular Discovery Work  – Dan Valen, Product Specialist, figshare


Registration is per site (access for one computer) and closes at 12:00 pm Eastern on March 11 for Part 1 and March 18 for Part 2 (the days of the webinars). Discounts are available for NISO and NASIG members and students.

NISO Library Standards Alliance (LSA) members receive one free connection as part of membership and do not need to register. (The LSA member webinar contact will automatically receive the login information. Members are listed If you would like to become an LSA member and receive the entire year’s webinars as part of membership, information on joining is listed here:

All webinar registrants and LSA webinar contacts receive access to the recorded version for one year. You can register for either or both parts. There is a 25% discount if registering for both. Visit the event webpages to register and for more information:
Part 1:
Part 2:

NLM Teleconference to Report on RFI and New Funding Mechanism for 2016-2021

Monday, January 26th, 2015

In May 2014, the National Library of Medicine posted a Request for Information (RFI) asking for ideas on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) ( can more effectively and efficiently provide equal access to biomedical information and improve an individual’s access to health information.  Based on the feedback from nearly 50 respondents and a review of historical data related to the program, NLM will change the award mechanism for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Libraries’ cycle from contracts to cooperative agreements.  This type of funding mechanism will allow NLM to participate more fully in the work of the RMLs and better coordinate collaborative programs and projects.  A Notice of Intent was published on the NIH Grants & Funding site on January 22, 2015.

Join NLM in a teleconference to hear about the responses to the RFI and learn about Cooperative Agreements:

  • Tuesday, January 27, 2015 / 4 pm (ET)
  • Teleconference Number:  1-888-450-5996
  • Participant Passcode: 662939

The world’s largest biomedical library, the National Library of Medicine maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology.