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Archive for the ‘Open Access’ Category

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Library Journal and School Library Journal invite you to participate in our 5th annual, online conference:

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

<http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/>.

 

This free event provide answers to some of the biggest challenges libraries face in the transformation of our culture from analog experiences to digital experiences. This daylong professional development conference can be viewed in groups or privately. There are no travel or registration fees, and attendees will connect with each other as well as hear exciting keynotes from award-winning scientist and NY Times Best Selling author author Daniel J. Levitin, PhD (Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in an Age of Information Overload) , and Anil Dash, cofounder and CEO of ThinkUp <https://www.thinkup.com/>, that will examine our shared digital future.

 

Our lineup of expert speakers and panelists will present innovative tools and ideas for and from libraries of all types. The day features different tracks dedicated to K-12, Academic, and Public, allowing for the day to be completely customizable. The day will focus on three key areas:

 

  • Content, Containers and Beyond
  • How libraries are creating, curating, and licensing, digitizing, archiving, and delivering content in today’s fast-changing digital world.
  • Collaboration and Innovation
  • How libraries are repositioning themselves as the digital nexus for theircommunities.
  • Leading the Learning Revolution
  • How libraries serve as essential links in a learning continuum.

 

Libraries @ the Center (#TDS14) <http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/> includes sessions on:

 

  • StatBase: Open source data management for libraries

 

  • Partnering with Small Organizations to Digitize Local Content

 

  • Bridging the K12-College Information Literacy Gap

 

  • Digital Strategies for Job Search Training

 

  • Hack Your Notebook: Leveraging Libraries for STEM-Literacy
  • Connections

 

  • Identifying and Delivering Meta-Literacy Skill Sets to Adult
  • Learners

 

  • Making Space for Play

 

More information is available online at http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/.

The Value Study as a Tool for Library Advocacy (Boost Box session)

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Presenters:

  • Joanne Gard Marshall, Distinguished Research Professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Julia Sollenberger, Associate Vice President and Director, Medical Center Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center

Date / Time: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:             https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary: The speakers will present the results of the Value Study the most useful for library advocacy and discuss how results are being used by librarians across the country. Over 16,000 physicians, residents and nurses served by 56 libraries participated in the study. As a result, the findings can be used by both participating and non-participating libraries.

Librarians are using the results to advocate for the importance of the library through posters, presentations, newsletters and personal contacts with administrators, educators and clinicians. Time saved by health professionals is also being also converted into dollars saved to show cost-effectiveness. Our examples show that librarians are using the results, but customizing their advocacy efforts so that they have maximum impact on their institution.

Librarians are making frequent use of the resources available on the Value Study website: http://nnlm.gov/mar/about/value.html, containing an overview of the study results suitable for presentation. Librarians are welcome to use the full presentation or key slides as needed.  Specialized PowerPoint summary reports are also available based on geographic region, as well as AAHSL and non-AAHSL sites, and the profession of respondents. The site provides access to the data and all supporting materials, including the survey. Features encourage data use, benchmarking with similar types of libraries, as well as study replication. Links to peer reviewed journal articles based on the study results are also available on the site. Two new publications, one in a nursing journal and one in a health care management journal are about to appear. Results from these additional analyses will be discussed.

NTIS Reports of Possible Interest

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values.

Report produced in 2014 by the Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

A White House report on big data released May 1 concludes that the explosion of data in today’s world can be an unprecedented driver of social progress, but it also has the potential to eclipse basic civil rights and privacy protections. The report drew praise from business and technology groups for its grasp of how big data analytics could improve education and healthcare, uncover wasteful government spending, and help with the nation’s continuing economic recovery. But those same groups cautioned that government attempts to regulate data collection could interfere with productivity and job growth.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis.

Report produced in 2013 by the National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Mathematical Sciences.

Experiments, observations, and numerical simulations in many areas of science and business are currently generating terabytes of data, and in some cases are on the verge of generating petabytes and beyond. Analyses of the information contained in these data sets have already led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from genomics to astronomy and high-energy physics and to the development of new information-based industries. Traditional methods of analysis have been based largely on the assumption that analysts can work with data within the confines of their own computing environment, but the growth of big data is changing that paradigm, especially in cases in which massive amounts of data are distributed across locations. While the scientific community and the defense enterprise have long been leaders in generating and using large data sets, the emergence of e-commerce and massive search engines has led other sectors to confront the challenges of massive data.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Data Mining Meets HCI: Making Sense of Large Graphs.

Report produced in 2012 by Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Machine Learning Department.

We have entered the age of big data. Massive datasets are now common in science, government and enterprises. Yet, making sense of these data remains a fundamental challenge. Where do we start our analysis. Where to go next. How to visualize our findings. We answers these questions by bridging Data Mining and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to create tools for making sense of graphs with billions of nodes and edges, focusing on (1) Attention Routing: we introduce this idea, based on anomaly detection, that automatically draws people’s attention to interesting areas of the graph to start their analyses. We present three examples Polonium unearths malware from 37 billion machine- file relationships NetProbe fingers bad guys who commit auction fraud. (2) Mixed-Initiative Sensemaking: we present two examples that combine machine inference and visualization to help users locate next areas of interest: Apolo guides users to explore large graphs by learning from few examples of user interest; Graphite finds interesting subgraphs, based on only fuzzy descriptions drawn graphically. (3) Scaling Up: we show how to enable interactive analytics of large graphs by leveraging Hadoop, staging of operations, and approximate computation. This thesis contributes to data mining, HCI, and importantly their intersection, including: interactive systems and algorithms that scale theories that unify graph mining approaches; and paradigms that overcome fundamental challenges in visual analytics. Our work is making impact to academia and society: Polonium protects 120 million people worldwide from malware; NetProbe made headlines on CNN, WSJ and USA Today; Pegasus won an open source software award; Apolo helps DARPA detect insider threats and prevent exfiltration. We hope our Big Data Mantra ‘Machine for Attention Routing Human for Interaction’ will inspire more innovations at the crossroad of data mining and HCI.

 

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

WHO Joins PubMed Central

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Global health authority, the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced the launch of a new open access policy in January 2014 to ensure the widespread dissemination of scientific research. The policy, which applies to all WHO-authored or WHO-funded research published in external journals and books, kicked into action on July 1, 2014.
There are many drivers behind the open access movement: to accelerate the pace of scientific research, discovery and innovation; increase the visibility, readership and impact of authors’ works, as well as to enhance interdisciplinary research, to name but a few. All factors point to one ultimate goal, the advancement of knowledge, which both researchers and publishers know, can only be reached by sharing results and making them as accessible as possible.

Effective January 1, articles authored or co-authored by WHO staff or WHO funding recipients will have to be published in an open-access journal or a hybrid open-access journal (a subscription journal with some open access articles). The research must be published under the terms of the standard Creative Commons licence or in a subscription journal that allows for the depositing of the article in Europe PubMed Central (Europe PMC) within 12 months of the official publication date.

WHO will become the 26th funding member of the open access repository Europe PMC; the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service. It provides free access to nearly 3 million full-text biomedical research articles, over 23 million abstracts from PubMed and 4 million biological and patent records. It is the same barrier-free and peer reviewed repository that BioMed Central publishes with, to ensure all its articles are immediately made freely available.

WHO will be joining 25 other life sciences and biomedical research funders at a time when providing free access to research outputs continues to be championed at the highest levels.

MOOC Course on Open Access

Friday, July 11th, 2014

Stanford offers new open access MOOC — Open Knowledge: Changing the Global Course of Learning
https://class.stanford.edu/courses/Education/OpenKnowledge/Fall2014/about

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ax02qLF-jEo

Open source, open science, open data, open access, open education, open learning — This fall Stanford librarians and faculty are working with international partners to offer the innovative free  (no-cost)  course Open Knowledge: Changing the Global Course of Learning on the OpenEdX platform (https://class.stanford.edu/courses/Education/OpenKnowledge/Fall2014/about)).

The course provides an introduction to the important concept of openness from a variety of perspectives, including library and information studies, education, publishing, economics, politics, and more. Open Knowledge is international and multi-institutional, bringing together instructors and students from Stanford University (USA), Fordham University (USA), University of British Columbia (Canada), Simon Frasier University (Canada), the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (Ghana), the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (Mexico), and the rest of the world.

Learn more about the concept of “open”, develop your digital literacy skills, and connect with peers from around the world.

For more information and to register: (https://class.stanford.edu/courses/Education/OpenKnowledge/Fall2014/about)

NISO Publishes Recommended Practice on Promoting Transparency in Library Discovery Services

Friday, June 27th, 2014

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) announces thepublication of a new recommended practice, Open Discovery Initiative:Promoting Transparency in Discovery (NISO RP-19-2014), which providesspecific guidelines on participation in the new generation of librarydiscovery services. The NISO Open Discovery Initiative (ODI) began work in2011 to develop recommendations that would increase transparency across allaspects of indexed discovery services. The group’s final publicationincludes guidelines to content providers on disclosure of level ofparticipation, the minimum set of metadata elements provided for indexing,linking practices, and technical formats.

Recommendations for discoveryservice providers address content listings, linking practices, file formatsand methods of transfer to be supported, and usage statistics. The documentalso provides background information on the evolution of discovery anddelivery technology and a standard set of terminology and definitions forthis technology area.

“An increasing number of libraries, especially those that serve academic orresearch institutions, have invested in the new generation of discoveryservices that use an aggregated central index to enable searching across awide range of library related resources,” explains Marshall Breeding, anindependent library consultant and Co-chair of the ODI Working Group. “Theselibraries expect their entire collection, including licensed and purchasedelectronic content, to be made available within their discovery service ofchoice. But it is often not clear which resources are available and whichare indexed in full text, by citations only, or both. Libraries deserve aclear explanation of the degree of availability of the content they licensein their discovery service-and they need usage statistics to help assess theeffectiveness of their discovery tool.”

“Index-based discovery services involve a complex ecosystem of interrelatingissues and interests among content providers.”

Check with NLM Before Discarding Journals

Friday, June 27th, 2014

NLM’s Journal Donation System makes it possible for libraries to determine whether NLM needs any volumes of the print journals they plan to discard.  The system can be used by DOCLINE and non-DOCLINE libraries to offer any title, including titles not owned by NLM.   The system can be accessed at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/journaldonation/ or by searching “Journal Donation System” on NLM’s home page.   In the system, click on “Help” for detailed instructions.  For additional assistance, contact NLM at (301) 496-0081 or NLMJournalDonation@mail.nlm.nih.gov.   NLM will pay shipping for volumes we need. To donate pre-1871 journal volumes to the History of Medicine Division, see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/about/donate.html.

Since the beginning of the online donation system in April 2009, over 10,000 gifts have been added to the collection.  With the help of libraries planning to discard journal volumes, NLM can build on the success achieved to date.

Karen Sinkule

Preservation and Collection Management Section

Journal Donation Unit

National Library of Medicine

8600 Rockville Pike

Bethesda, MD 20894

sinkulek@mail.nlm.nih.gov

MOOC Course on Copyright

Friday, June 20th, 2014

A short Coursera MOOC on copyright, designed for teachers and librarians at all levels, offered starting on July 21.  The MOOC is taught by three librarian/lawyers who all specialize in this area — Lisa A. Macklin, JD, MLS from Emory, Anne Gilliland from UNC Chapel Hill, and Kevin Smith from Duke University.

More information and enrollment are available at the course site — https://www.coursera.org/course/cfel

Copyright Issues

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

https://www.coursera.org/#course/cfel

Kevin Smith, the scholarly communication officer and copyright expert at Duke University and two colleagues are organizing a four-week MOOC on the basics of copyright.  Course is aimed at librarians and K-12 educators and offered on the Coursera platform.  Sounds like a great, free opportunity to learn from one of the best.  Let me know if there is any interest in doing this in a group.

Is it in the Public Domain?

The Samuelson Law Clinic at the University of California, Berkeley, has released a very cool handbook/set of visual tools to help researchers determine whether a work is still under copyright.  Article:  http://www.law.berkeley.edu/17178.htm

Handbook and Visuals:  http://www.law.berkeley.edu/files/Final_PublicDomain_Handbook.pdf

ORCID: The Universal Author Identifier (Boost Box session)

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Presenter:          Andrea Ketchum, Reference Librarian, Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Summary:          Almost 25% of PubMed queries are author searches, yet 2/3 of authors in MEDLINE share the same last name and first initial with an average of eight other authors! This session will explore name ambiguity and introduce ORCID, the international registry that provides a persistent digital identifier to authors, useful throughout the scholarly communication lifecycle. Learn the benefits of ORCID to authors and researchers as well as publishers, funders, universities and professional societies, and how to get started with a new ORCID ID.

Date / Time:      Tuesday, June 10, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:               Online / No Registration Required

·       If you’re unable to connect for any reason, then join us by phone. The # will be displayed after you login.