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Archive for the ‘News from NLM/NIH’ Category

November is National Native American Heritage Month

Friday, November 14th, 2014

During November, the nation collectively recognizes the achievements, contributions and rich culture of the Native Americans.

History Native American Heritage Month was first recognized in 1915 with the annual meeting of the Congress of the American Indian Association, building upon previous work of Dr. Arthur C. Parker. Despite this proclamation, various states began organizing days of commemoration at different times of the year. It wasn’t until 1990 that a joint resolution from the White House was issued, designating November as National American Indian Heritage Month. Learn more about the history of Native American Heritage Month from the Library of Congress.

Health Concerns American Indians and Alaska Natives have a unique relationship with the federal government. Tribes exist as sovereign entities, but federally recognized tribes are entitled to health and educational services provided by the federal government. Though the Indian Health Service (IHS) is charged with serving the health needs of these populations, more than half of American Indians and Alaska Natives do not permanently reside on a reservation, and therefore have limited or no access to IHS services. Though often referred to as a singular group, American Indians and Alaska Natives represent diverse cultures, languages and customs unique to each community. Health challenges, however, have not been as unique with many Native American communities similarly experiencing the harsh impact of diabetes, HIV/AIDS, heart disease, stroke and infant mortality.

Profile: American Indian and Alaska Native Health Statistics by Disease Leading Causes of Death Other Critical Health Issues Find Journals and Publications Affordable Care Act and Native Americans The Affordable Care Act, also known as the health care law, was created to expand access to coverage, control health care costs, and improve health care quality and coordination. The ACA also includes permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act , which extends the current law and authorizes new programs and services within the Indian Health Service.

More about the Affordable Care Act and Native Americans Fact sheet: The ACA and American Indian and Alaska Native People

Our Work Delivery of health services and funding of programs to maintain and improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives are consonant with the federal government’s historical and unique legal relationship with Indian Tribes. In recognition of this, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) supports research on improving the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native Health Research Advisory Council (HRAC) American Indian/Alaska Native Health Disparities Program Grantees All grants and cooperative agreements American Indian/Alaska Native Tribal Initiative Awards (TIHA) Native Generations , an infant mortality awareness campaign Circle of Life , a multimedia HIV/AIDS/STI curriculum for Native youth National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services

Ways to Commemorate Native American Heritage Month

Educate yourself! Read up on the history of the Native people of the Americas and the creation of Native American History Month.

Raise awareness! Organize a community event to raise awareness about the health disparities that exist among Native American communities.

Get covered! Learn more about affordable health care options now available to you and your family and spread the word.

Share your story! How are you celebrating Native American Heritage Month? What’s happening in your organization or community? Share your story or tweet with us throughout the month.

From the Office of Minority Health

NIH Request for Information on Data Management and Data Science

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

The NIH has issued a Request for Information (RFI) on the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative Resources for Teaching and Learning Biomedical Big Data Management and Data Science, with a submission deadline of December 31, 2014.  As part of its Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative, NIH wishes to help the broader scientific community update knowledge and skills in the important areas of the science, storage, management and sharing of biomedical big data, and wants to identify the array of timely, high quality courses and online learning materials already available on data science and data management topics for biomedical big data.

With this RFI Notice, the NIH invites interested and knowledgeable persons to inform NIH about existing learning resources covering Biomedical Big Data management and data science topics. All responses must be submitted electronically by December 31, 2014, in the form of an email, using the subject “data management.” PPT files or other curriculum materials should not be attached to responses. Responses are welcome from associations and professional organizations as well as individual stakeholders.

Helpful Ebola Information

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Hospital Emergency Preparedness and Response during Superstorm Sandy

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

This 43-page document is a report from the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General, which found that 89% of hospitals in Superstorm Sandy-related declared disaster areas experienced “substantial challenges” responding to the storm, which affected Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York in October 2012.

Specifically, the 174 Medicare-certified hospitals in these three states that were examined for this report, stated that they struggled with interrelated infrastructure and resource sharing problems in the storm’s aftermath:  http://go.usa.gov/7pGA

NIH News in Health

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Steps Toward a Healthier Life

Diabetes raises your risk for heart disease, blindness, amputations, and other serious issues. But the most common type of diabetes, called type 2 diabetes, can be prevented or delayed if you know what steps to take.

Parkinson’s Disease
Understanding a Complicated Condition

Parkinson’s disease can rob a person of the ability to do everyday tasks that many of us take for granted. There’s no cure, but treatment can help.

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.

Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!

Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

Job Ad: Head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM), Bethesda, MD

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

The Head of the National Network Office of the NN/LM<http://www.nlm.nih.gov/network.html> serves as a national leader in developing collaborations among the varied types of libraries in the Network, including health sciences libraries, and academic and public institutions to improve access to and the sharing of biomedical information resources.  The NNO Head is responsible for monitoring, evaluating, and advising on all aspects of providing biomedical information, for outreach to groups experiencing health disparities, and for providing access to medical information in national and international emergency and disaster situations.  The NNO Head advises on public health information policy issues as related to programs conducted throughout the Network.   This is an exciting time for an incoming Head because plans for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Library contracts are underway.

The very short posting time of November 7 through 21 reflects the government’s effort to hire talented people quickly. NLM seeks applicants from all sources.  Please see the postings on USAJobs.gov<http://USAJobs.gov>  and follow the instructions to apply.  One posting is for “All US Citizens” and the other is for “Status Candidates” (Merit Promotion<http://www.opm.gov/faqs/topic/usajobs/index.aspx> and VEOA Eligibles <http://www.fedshirevets.gov/hire/hm/shav/index.aspx>).

NLM Supervisory Librarian – All US Citizens <https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/385828200>

NLM Supervisory Librarian – Status Candidates (Merit Promotion and VEOA Eligibles) <https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/385828700>

The jobs will also be linked from “Careers @ NLM<http://www.nlm.nih.gov/careers/careers.html>” on the NLM home page,www.nlm.nih.gov<http://www.nlm.nih.gov>.

In addition to an interesting, challenging work environment, NLM has a great location on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.  NIH is a short Metro ride from Washington D.C. and a short walk from Bethesda’s thriving restaurant and retail district.  As a supervisory librarian at the GS15 level, the position has a salary range of $124,995-$157,100, and reports to the Associate Director for Library Operations, Joyce Backus

If you have questions about this job please contact Sheri Ligget, PHR, 301-402-7521, or sliggett@od.nih.gov<mailto:sliggett@od.nih.gov>. Please share this job opportunity announcement with other interested lists and organizations.

Dr. Lindberg to Retire

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has announced the upcoming retirement of Donald Lindberg as Director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  Dr. Lindberg will be retiring at the end of March 2015.

Dr. Lindberg’s many accomplishments since he first started in 1984 were described.  He is “a pioneer in applying computer and communications technology to biomedical research, health care, and the delivery of health information wherever it is needed.”  We have appreciated Dr. Lindberg’s unwavering support of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM).

NIH Director’s statement on Dr. Lindberg’s retirement:  http://www.nih.gov/about/director/11062014_statement_lindberg.htm

PubMed Mobile Update

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

PubMed Mobile will soon be updated with a variety of new features and modifications: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_pm_mobile.html

NLM’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) Rebranded as HealthReach

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

The National Library of Medicine’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) resource was a national collaborative partnership with the principal focus of creating and making available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees. In October 2014, NLM’s Specialized Information Services (SIS) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach.

This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations. Over the next several months new resources will be added to the website. There is also a new Twitter feed, @NLM_HealthReach. There isn’t much change between the old RHIN and the new HealthReach; this was intentional to help with the continuity of service through the transition.

Webinar: Preparing Your Healthcare System for Ebola

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Hospital executives, hospital emergency management directors and/or safety officers across the U.S. are invited to participate in a conference call with leaders from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and other government agencies. The discussion will be on preparing healthcare systems to protect health and safety should an Ebola patient present at your facility.

When:   Friday, October 31st / 3 – 4 pm (ET)

Leaders from:

  • Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, HHS
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS
  • Intergovernmental and External Affairs, HHS
  • Department of Transportation

How:  Call: 800-857-0664; Participant passcode: 8614132

Audio streaming for this call is also available at: http://event.on24.com/r.htm?e=881903&s=1&k=9993B9653B997A940CA3801B5A9E9D4F

HHS held two previous calls, Preparing Your Healthcare System for Ebola, on October 9th and October 20th.  Auto replays and transcripts of these calls are available at http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/responders/ebola/Pages/ebola-calls.aspx for your reference.

Please check the ASPR Ebola Webpage and CDC Ebola Webpage regularly for the most current information. State and local health departments with questions should contact the CDC Emergency Operations Center (eocreport@cdc.gov).