Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About MAR | Contact MAR | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘News from NLM/NIH’ Category

Webinar: Digital Humanitarians

Saturday, March 28th, 2015

WHAT:  Disaster Information Specialists Program webinar

WHEN:  Thursday, April 9, 2015 at 1:30 PM ET

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:  The Disaster Information Specialist monthly webinar is free and open to everyone – please spread the word and invite others in your organizations, send to your email lists, and post to your social media accounts.

TOPIC:  Digital Humanitarians

Our April 9th webinar will feature Patrick Meier, PhD. Patrick is an internationally recognized speaker and thought leader on humanitarian technology and innovation.  He will talk about being a digital humanitarian which is the subject of his recent book entitled “Digital Humanitarians: How Big Data is Changing Humanitarian Response.”

Patrick is currently the Director of Social Innovation at QCRI where he both develops and deploys unique next generation humanitarian technologies in partnership with multiple humanitarian groups.  Among his many accomplishments, Patrick served as Director of Crisis Mapping for Ushahidi, leading major crisis mapping efforts in Haiti, Libya, Somalia and Syria. He has consulted extensively for many inter-national organizations and programs including the UN Secretariat, UN Global Pulse, OCHA, UNDP, UNICEF, USAID, and the World Bank. He also co-founded the CrisisMappers Network, the Standby Volunteer Task Force and the Digital Humanitarians Network. Patrick has received a numerous awards and recognitions for his work, including being named as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer.  Read more about Patrick and his work at http://irevolution.net/bio.

This webinar will be presented live through Adobe Connect and recorded for future viewing at http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dismeetings.html.

LOGIN:   To join the meeting at 1:30 pm ET, Thursday, April 9, click on https://webmeeting.nih.gov/disinfo

Enter your name in the guest box and click “Enter Room”.

A box should pop up asking for your phone number.

Enter your phone number and the system will call you.

For those who cannot use this call-back feature, the dial-in information is:

Dial-In:  1-888-757-2790

Pass-Code: 745907

—————-

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect Pro meeting before:

Test your connection: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

—————-

MORE INFORMATION:  For more information on this and past meetings, see http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dismeetings.html

Addressing Preparedness Challenges for Children in Public Health Emergencies

Saturday, March 28th, 2015

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), March 2015

This one-hour presentation features speakers who discuss strategies to address the unique vulnerabilities of children in every stage of emergency planning. Presenters highlight the strong progress that has been made in pediatric disaster readiness, as well as the collaboration that is still needed between public health professionals and pediatric care providers to improve the outcomes for children during emergencies.

http://disasterlit.nlm.nih.gov/search/?searchTerms=ID%3A10356&search=Search&search.x=0&search.y=0

Webinar: Explore the New National Preparedness Training Plan

Saturday, March 28th, 2015

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 2:00 PM (EST)

Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response Learning Office (OPHPR LO) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This webinar will introduce frontline public health workers to the high-quality, current trainings that have been assigned one or more of the Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR) Core Competencies and/or the Public Health Preparedness (PHEP) Capabilities, and focus on the creation of a national emergency preparedness training plan around these competencies using TRAIN. TRAIN is a learning management system offered as a free service of Public Health Foundation and operates through collaborative partnerships with state and federal agencies, local and national organizations, and educational institutions.

http://www.phf.org/events/Pages/Training_for_Results_Preparedness_and_Emergency_Response_Core_Competency_Based_Training.aspx

Register on TRAIN: https://cdc.train.org/DesktopModules/eLearning/CourseDetails/CourseDetailsForm.aspx?tabid=62&CourseID=1054874&backURL=aHR0cHM6Ly9jZGMudHJhaW4ub3JnL0Rlc2t0b3BTaGVsbC5hc3B4

NLM and CDC Co-Hosting Webinars on New Community Health Status Indicators

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Library of Medicine to Co-Host Webinars on Newly-Released Community Health Status Indicators CHIS 2015 Web Application: http://wwwn.cdc.gov/CommunityHealth

March 24th, 2015 / 3 – 4 pm (ET) and reprised on March 26th, 2015 / 11 am – Noon (ET)

This webinar will provide an overview of the new features and redesign of CDC’s Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI http://wwwn.cdc.gov/CommunityHealth) 2015 online web application.

Learn first-hand from experts who developed CHSI 2015 about how best to use this redesigned and newly released web application.

Webinar Agenda

  • Brief History of CHSI
  • Summary of the Redesign Project
  • Overview of New Features
  • Web Site Demonstration
  • Q/A

What is New for CHSI 2015?

The new features include:

Registration Information

Please register for either session. After your registration has been received, you will be sent instructions for joining the meeting. Webinars will be recorded.

 

Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) 2015 Web Application Briefing (Tuesday, March 24)

Register https://nih.webex.com/nih/j.php?RGID=r08d4b4e36a1bbcc9bdd4960d1808e424

Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) 2015 Web Application Briefing (Thursday, March 26)

Register https://nih.webex.com/nih/j.php?RGID=rd8be8cb8600d2100b6b73a7f8703f966

Can’t register? Contact support. https://nih.webex.com/nih/mc

About CHSI 2015

CHSI 2015 is an interactive online tool that produces health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States. Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes that describe the population health status of a county and factors that have the potential to influence health outcomes, such as health care access and quality, health behaviors, social factors and the physical environment. CHSI 2015 supports comparisons to peer counties, HP 2020 targets and national performance, and is designed to complement other available sources of community health indicators including the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps. First issued in 2000, CHSI 2015 represents the collaboration of public health partners in the public, non-profit and research communities. Visit the new CHSI Web application today! http://wwwn.cdc.gov/CommunityHealth.

CMS, ONC Release Proposed Rules for Meaningful Use Stage 3

Saturday, March 21st, 2015

Eight objectives for advanced use of electronic health record systems: http://www.fierceemr.com/story/cms-onc-release-proposed-rules-meaningful-use-stage-3/2015-03-20?utm_campaign=AddThis&utm_medium=AddThis&utm_source=email#.VQyMXG4CJLI.email

Important News about Quick Health Data Online

Saturday, March 21st, 2015

After many years of hosting Quick Heath Data Online, the Office on Women’s Health has decided to close down the website. The website, www.healthstatus2020.com, will no longer be available after March 31, 2015.

In the meantime, we encourage you to save and download the special features including:

If you have questions, please email us.

You can continue to find free and reliable women’s health statistics online.

Job Ad: Part-time Librarian to Support NLM’s DIMRC

Saturday, March 21st, 2015

Interested in a job as a Disaster Information Specialist?  Please consider applying and/or sharing with others:

The Health Informatics and Technology Solutions Division of ICF international is currently seeking a Part-Time Librarian or Library/Information School Graduate Student to work in Bethesda, MD.

https://icfi.taleo.net/careersection/icf_prof_ext/jobdetail.ftl?job=1500000793&lang=en

NLM Resource Update: ToxLearn Module II Now Available

Friday, March 13th, 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) ToxLearn, Module II: Cells and Tissues: Injury and Repair is now available. It offers an introduction to biological molecules, cells, tissues, and organs, and to how they might be affected by toxicants. It also explains principles of cell damage and tissue repair and reviews physiological and morphological changes.

Created in partnership with the Society of Toxicology, ToxLearn is a multi-module online learning tool that provides an introduction to basic principles of toxicology. It can be used as a supplementary curriculum to a first-level undergraduate toxicology course and can assist users in interpreting search retrieval from NLM’s TOXNET databases.

ToxLearn Module I: Introduction to Toxicology and Dose-Response is also available. ToxLearn Modules 1 and 2 update some of the information in the earlier Tox Tutor.

PubMed Send to Order Feature

Friday, March 13th, 2015

PubMed users continue to report an issue where the menu choices do not display when using the PubMed “Send to” feature. When this was first reported, it was determined that the problem occurs for those using older browsers (Internet Explorer 7 and 8) not supported by PubMed, or using “Compatibility View” in newer browsers (IE10 or 11). Users encountering this issue should upgrade to a more current version of Internet Explorer (IE10 or IE11) or use Firefox.

DOCLINE users with new or upgraded browsers should configure their browser settings according to DOCLINE System Requirements to ensure full functionality. PubMed users should refer to the Browser Advice for NCBI Web Pages site.

DOCLINE users who are unable to upgrade or change browsers at this time can work around the issue by opening two separate browser tabs or windows, one for PubMed and the other for DOCLINE. This will allow them to search PubMed in one window/tab, then copy & paste the PMIDs from PubMed into DOCLINE in the other window/tab. Users of IE10 or IE11 experiencing the issue should check that “Compatibility View” is turned off, as follows:

  • Open Internet Explorer
  • Click Tools
  • Click Compatibility View settings
  • Uncheck “Display all websites in Compatibility View” or remove DOCLINE from the list of “Websites you’ve added to Compatibility View”
  • Close & reopen Internet Explorer

Note to QDPortal users – if you experience the PubMed “send to” issue with a current browser version, contact QuickDoc customer at support@nesurv.com, or by phone at (617) 738-1800.

HHS Expands Its Approach to Making Research Results Freely Available for the Public

Friday, March 13th, 2015

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) took a giant step forward in enabling the public to obtain results of government-funded research.  HHS released a comprehensive set of plans outlining how its agencies will expand access to the results of scientific research for the public.  These plans were developed in response to a White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) memorandum that directed federal research agencies to increase access to peer-reviewed scientific publications and digital data developed by researchers.

Within HHS, five of the largest research funding agencies developed plans in accordance with HHS’s common approach to Public Access: National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR).  These plans build on our existing Open Government goals of increasing transparency, collaboration and participation, and lowering barriers to accessing health information.

Our plans expand upon an NIH requirement that investigators make any peer-reviewed publications resulting from their NIH-funded research available to the public within 12 months of publication.  The centerpiece of the effort is PubMed Central (PMC), a free full-text archive of the biomedical and life sciences journal literature, supported by the National Library of Medicine.

HHS’ Public Access Plan Details 

HHS’s public access plans are expanding access to research results in two key domains: peer-reviewed publications and digital data.

Peer-reviewed Publications – We are expanding the types of peer-reviewed articles that will be required to be deposited into PMC.  Researchers funded by NIH, CDC, FDA, AHRQ and ASPR will be required to submit their publications into PMC within 12 months of their publication.  The addition of these agencies will increase the corpus of available research to include new topics such as: comparative effectiveness, emergency preparedness, public health, environmental health, and toxicological research.

Digital Data – We are also requiring that the data produced by researchers be made publically accessible in a digital format.  At a minimum, the data underlying publications will need to be available at the time of publication.  As part of this effort, our agencies will require that investigators submit data management plans outlining how their data will be managed and shared as part of their initial research proposals.[1]

View HHS’s public access plans.

Impact of Greater Access to Health Information

Given that health information is one of the most highly sought after types of information on the web, the impact of successful implementation of our public access plans is likely to be significant.  We anticipate our public access efforts will augment the over 3 million papers that are currently available to the public through PMC.  Our requirements will add to this repository an estimated 110,000 peer-reviewed scholarly articles authored by HHS-funded researchers each year.  This is just the tip of the iceberg.  As a result of the partnerships we have established with many of the leading scientific publishers, additional journal articles are being voluntarily added to PMC.  As the contents of PMC grow and diversify, we anticipate that it will create yet more opportunities for new connections to be made among disparate fields of scientific inquiry, and new types of knowledge and insights that can benefit health and healthcare. We expect it will allow for faster dissemination of research results into products, services and clinical practices that can improve healthcare.

We expect the new requirements for data sharing will be highly impactful, not only in terms of follow-on research that can be enabled, but also for ensuring the integrity of the scientific enterprise through allowing others to confirm the reproducibility of any published experiment. By ensuring that all publicly released research data is provided in open, machine-readable formats that can easily be accessed for computational analysis and machine-learning, it is our hope that we can help realize the promise of ‘big data’ in medicine and healthcare.

Next Steps for Public Access 

A major focus over the coming year will be the policy development processes necessary to turn these plans into practice.  Several agencies, such as FDA, AHRQ and ASPR, will be developing public access policies for the first time.  Other agencies, such as NIH and CDC, will be updating existing policies.  In parallel with the policy development efforts, we will be working to integrate new partners into PMC, which will include new segments of the publishing and research communities.

Over the next year, we will continue our efforts to explore how we can develop the infrastructure necessary to support  data linkages across HHS, and facilitate the public’s ability to locate and access data published by our funded researchers.  Outreach and communications to our partners, both internal and external, will be critical to the success of our public access efforts.  We look forward to working together with all of the stakeholders to increase the usability of health research funded by HHS, and to creating an information ecosystem that will catalyze improvements in health and healthcare for all Americans.