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Archive for the ‘News from NLM/NIH’ Category

NLM Teleconference to Report on RFI and New Funding Mechanism for 2016-2021

Monday, January 26th, 2015

In May 2014, the National Library of Medicine posted a Request for Information (RFI) asking for ideas on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) (http://nnlm.gov) can more effectively and efficiently provide equal access to biomedical information and improve an individual’s access to health information.  Based on the feedback from nearly 50 respondents and a review of historical data related to the program, NLM will change the award mechanism for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Libraries’ cycle from contracts to cooperative agreements.  This type of funding mechanism will allow NLM to participate more fully in the work of the RMLs and better coordinate collaborative programs and projects.  A Notice of Intent was published on the NIH Grants & Funding site on January 22, 2015.

Join NLM in a teleconference to hear about the responses to the RFI and learn about Cooperative Agreements:

  • Tuesday, January 27, 2015 / 4 pm (ET)
  • Teleconference Number:  1-888-450-5996
  • Participant Passcode: 662939

The world’s largest biomedical library, the National Library of Medicine maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology.

SciENcv Enhancements: NIH and NSF Biographical Sketch Formats

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

SciENcv enhancements will include the new NIH biographical sketch format as a choice for creating SciENcv profiles. SciENcv will continue to support the current NIH biographical sketch format; however, NIH encourages researchers to use the new format with their grant submissions. Researchers will be required to employ the new NIH biographical sketch starting May 25, 2015. Users will be able to utilize their existing Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) profiles to create profiles in the new NIH biographical sketch format, as well as be able to select the new NIH biographical sketch format when creating profiles manually or through a data feed from an external source. The Personal Statement section of the NIH biographical sketch has been updated to include an option to list up to four peer-reviewed citations. A new section, Contribution to Science, replaces the former section Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications, and it aims to give researchers a place where they can describe five of their most significant contributions to science.

SciENcv users will also soon be able to create profiles in the National Science Foundation (NSF) biographical sketch format. This newly added format will be available to download in PDF, MS Word or XML, and users will be able to share their SciENcv NSF profiles through a public URL. In addition, by linking your NSF account to an NCBI account, you will be able to populate SciENcv profiles with information stored in your NSF account. The NSF biographical sketch is the official format used for grant submissions to the NSF and consists of five sections: Professional Preparation, Appointments, Products, Synergistic Activities, and Collaborators & Other Affiliations.

For more information visit the NLM Technical Bulletin articles: My NCBI – New NIH Biographical Sketch Available in SciENcv and My NCBI – National Science Foundation Biographical Sketch and Data Integration with SciENcv.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

National Library of Medicine Resource Update: Alternatives to Animal Testing Portal

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine’s (NLM) Alternatives to Animal Testing (ALTBIB) portal provides access to PubMed/MEDLINE citations relevant to alternatives to the use of live vertebrates in biomedical research and testing. The ALTBIB topics and subtopics are aligned with current U.S. and international approaches. For example, information is provided on in silico, in vitro, and refined or improved animal testing methods. Strategies that incorporate validated methods and other approaches are also covered. In addition to the topic areas for PubMed searches, the ALTBIB portal includes a searchable bibliographic collection of alternatives to animal testing, including citations from published articles, books, book chapters, and technical reports published from 1980 to 2000.

The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), part of NLM’s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET), now includes subheadings (“/alternative/ and /in vitro tests/”) in the Human and Non-Human Toxicity Excerpts fields. These subheadings allow users to locate data from in vitro and other alternative methods. For example, users can search “ALTERNATIVE IN VITRO TESTS” to locate records with this data. Coverage includes results from methods validated by the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) and the European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL-ECVAM).

NLM HIV/AIDS Portal Now Offers Multilingual Content Search

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

NLM’s HIV/AIDS Portal now offers the ability to search for multilingual content. The new Multilingual Search interface searches specifically for HIV/AIDS related topics from the multilingual and multicultural content of HealthReach (formerly RHIN). HealthReach offers easy access to quality health information to individuals for whom English is not the primary language. It is also an important resource for health professionals as well as public health administrators. Users can search by subject/topic, language, and format. The default for the search is always HIV/AIDS so there is no need for these terms to be included in the search. There is also an Advanced Search capability to further refine retrieval. The content is available in audio and video formats as well as text. For text documents there is a feature that allows viewing the document in a split screen with one side being English and the other being the language requested in the search.

Free PubMed Training

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

There is still space for a FREE PubMed training session at National Library of Medicine (NLM) in Bethesda, MD.  The class, “PubMed for Trainers,” consists of 3 online sessions (held 1/27, 1/29, and 2/3/2015 from 10 am – 12 noon ET) and one in–person session at NLM (held February 5, 2015 from 9 am – 4:30 pm).

The class features in-depth information about PubMed as well as an optional instructional design component.  Participants who complete the PubMed portion of the class will receive 13 MLA CE credit hours; participants who complete the instructional design component will receive an additional 3 MLA CE credits.

For more information and to register:  http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=359

Questions?  Contact us at ntc@utah.edu<mailto:ntc@utah.edu>.

Sharon Dennis, Assistant Director

National Library of Medicine Training Center (NTC)

Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library University of Utah

Salt Lake City, UT   84112

http://nnlm.gov/ntc

NIH News in Health Now Available

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Check out the January issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

Osteoporosis in Aging: Protect Your Bones with Exercise
Bones feel solid, but the inside of a bone is actually filled with holes like a honeycomb. Bone tissues are broken down and rebuilt all the time. While some cells build new bone tissue, others dissolve bone and release the minerals inside.

Listen Up! Noises Can Damage Your Hearing
Sounds surround us. We enjoy many of them—like music, birdsong, and conversations with friends. But loud or long-lasting noises—from motors, power tools, and even headphones—can permanently damage your hearing. Take steps to protect your ears from harmful noises.

Ebola Vaccine Prompts Immune Response
An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it. Based on these results, researchers are planning further studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.

Detect Glaucoma Early To Protect Vision
Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve, which carries visual signals from the eye to the brain. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to vision loss or blindness. But many people with early-stage glaucoma have no symptoms. By the time they’re diagnosed, they may have already noticed changes to their side, or peripheral, vision.

Featured Website: Rethinking Drinking
Have you taken a look at your drinking habits and how they may affect your health? Some people have symptoms of an alcohol use disorder without recognizing them. Others don’t know where to find help to cut back or quit. This site offers research-based information about how alcohol affects your health and tips for making changes.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH. The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, PubMed/MEDLINE may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary. On December 16, NLM resumed daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed.

NLM Selected as a Host Site for the 2015 National Digital Stewardship Residency

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce its participation in the second year of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR), a significant partnership of the Library of Congress (LC) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), to build a dedicated community of stewards capable of managing, preserving and making accessible the nation’s digital assets. The NDSR enables recent Master’s program graduates in relevant fields to complete a paid 12-month residency at host institutions in the Washington DC area, where they work on significant digital stewardship projects. Similar NDSR programs are on-going in Boston and New York.

NLM’s NDSR project proposal, to select and preserve an NLM-produced software product, was chosen in a highly competitive process from about 15 other proposals. NLM will join the American Institute of Architects, the DC Public Library, the Government Publishing Office and the U.S. Senate, Historical Office as a host institution beginning in June, 2015. A detailed list of all five projects can be found at the NDSR website. This is the second year that NLM has been chosen as an NDSR host site, evidence of NLM’s commitment and support of digital stewardship.

NDSR is now accepting applications for qualified applicants for places in the five Washington DC host institutions. The residency application period is open from December 17 to January 30. The application instructions and list of requirements can be found on the NDSR website. Candidates may apply online for one of the five residencies.

NLM Resource Update: TOXNET Now Provides Permalinks to Individual Records

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

TOXNET is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/. TOXNET includes the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) which provides toxicity data for over 5,700 potentially hazardous chemicals. HSDB also has information on emergency handling procedures, industrial hygiene, environmental fate, human exposure, detection methods, and regulatory requirements. HSDB is one of the features of WISER, the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/.

Permanent links to National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET records are now provided for HSDB as well as TOXLINE, LactMed, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART), Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER), Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS), and GENE-TOX.

To create a permanent link, click on the “Permalink” button found in the upper right of a TOXNET record. This provides a pop-up window with a URL to share or to save for retrieving the record at a later time.