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Archive for the ‘K-12’ Category

Sparky the Fire Dog

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Sparky the Fire Dog is the mascot for the National Fire Protection Association. The Sparky the Fire Dog website allows kids to explore and learn about safety in a safe and interactive environment. During March, the “Cool To Do” section highlights reading. Kids can print out bookplates and find mystery stories to read to learn about fire safety. March 18th is Sparky’s birthday, so be sure to check out the fun on the birthday page as well; there you will find a downloadable eBook for kids ages 7-12.

Cool To Do: Read for Safety: http://sparky.org/#/Sparky/CoolToDo

Sparky’s Birthday Surprise: http://www.sparky.org/appworld/index.php

Network Members to Be Congratulated!

Friday, March 14th, 2014

If any of our network members have special announcements they’d like to share, let us know!  We’d love to brag about any awards received, publications, MLA-related news, or whatever.  Simply send your announcement to Missy Harvey at mjharvey@pitt.edu and we’ll be happy to share your news with ALL of our network members.

NLM Education Connection

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Toxicology Resources for the Classroom

AP Environmental Science and AP Chemistry teachers often can’t locate Web sites that support the mandated coursework. Our TOXNET site provides a wealth of information regarding chemicals including chemical structures, health effects, industrial usage, and more.

TOXNET is a databank for all of the National Library of Medicine’s toxicology Web sites. When you enter a chemical name into the databank search results will populate with details on which NLM databases hold information about that chemical. For example, let’s say you are teaching an environmental science class, and you want to do research on the recent chemical spill in West Virginia. Simply enter the chemical “4-methylcyclohexane methanol” and a list of resources that contain that chemical will appear in the search results window.

Health Observances: National Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month. Health and nutrition are taught in our schools at an early age. In some areas, middle schools and high schools require all students to take a health class as part of the curriculum. MedlinePlus offers a great specialty page devoted to Nutrition and its importance for the body. As you dive into the subject of nutrition, pull documentation from our online library, or assign our Web site as a source for students to conduct their own research.

Desalination Video that Wows!

We would like to introduce our first animated video written and produced by one of our talented college interns. This video helps middle school students understand the concept of desalination. It uses simple animation to show how water treatment plants use desalination to clean the water that we use.

Let us know what you think. View our new video, “Desalination:A Solution for Our Water Needs,” video and send feedback to matzkink@mail.nih.gov.

Head of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine is Retiring

Friday, February 28th, 2014

NN/LM MAR is saying goodbye to our friend and leader, Dr. Angela Ruffin, as she retires:  http://nnlm.gov/mar/newsletter/2014/02/saying-goodbye-as-angela-ruffin-retires/

Winter Issue of MAReport Newsletter Available

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Check out the Winter 2014 issue of our newsletter, The MAReporthttp://nnlm.gov/mar/newsletter/.

NOTE:  We encourage you to subscribe so MAReport will be delivered to your inbox.

To subscribehttp://www.hsls.pitt.edu/www/updatenewsletterlist/?p=subscribe&id=3

K-12 Team Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness Classroom Lesson Plans & Activities

Friday, February 21st, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services K-12 Workgroup has released classroom activities and lesson plans to supplement the Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness website.

For grades 6-12, these classroom activities and lesson plans familiarize students to the health and medicine of Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.  The activities and lesson plans are available at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/resources/lesson-plans-list.html.

The activities and lesson plans use Native Voices exhibition website content material and other NLM online educational/science resources.

The activities and lesson plans are composed of four units.  Each unit introduces a different way of exploring and learning about the Native Voices exhibition in about 1.5 to 3 hours.  These units are: 1) A scavenger hunt, 2) An environmental health science lesson, 3) A social science lesson, and 4) A biology lesson.

While the activities and lesson plans can be used in science classrooms, clubs, and programs, they can be used also to reinforce the history and societal developments of Native peoples in social science and history classrooms.

About the Native Voices Website

The Native Voices Web site (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices) allows people to experience an exhibition currently on display at NLM in Bethesda, Maryland.  Both versions explore the connection between wellness, illness and cultural life through a combination of interviews with Native people and interactive media.

For additional information, please contact:

K-12 Team Leader

Alla Keselman, PhD

National Library of Medicine

keselmana@mail.nih.gov

MAR Announces New Funding Opportunities

Friday, January 31st, 2014

NN/LM MAR announces a new round of funding for projects to be completed May 1, 2014 – April 30, 2015.

Available Awards

  • New!  Emergency Preparedness / Library Partnerships
  • New!  Health Information Awareness
  • Outreach to Consumers:  now includes funding for underserved, minority populations
  • Medical Library Projects
  • Exhibitor Awards:  now includes K-12 nurses, health / science teachers or librarians
  • Professional Development
  • Outreach to Health Professionals:  now includes funding for…
    • community college faculty, librarians and/or students affiliated with health sciences programs at their college
    • minority health students or health professionals, or health professionals serving medically underserved areas / populations

Apply now!  Applications accepted until March 14, 2014http://nnlm.gov/mar/funding/

To learn about funding MAR has awarded previously:

Easy Tips to Manage Your Children’s Health

Saturday, November 9th, 2013

Keeping your kids healthy is one of your top priorities as a parent, but it’s not always an easy task. Between staying on top of their normal checkups and trying to get them to wash their hands before dinner, there are a lot of things that could slip through the cracks. Use these tips from USA.gov to make managing your kids’ health a little easier.

Stay up-to-date with your children’s immunizations and developmental milestones with an easy tracking chart you can download for free from Publications.USA.gov. It reminds you of all the necessary immunizations from infancy through age six. It also highlights developmental milestones—like recognizing a caregiver’s voice and learning to talk—that you can monitor as your children grow up.

If you’re struggling to pay for health insurance for your kids, they may be eligible for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP offers free or low-cost medical coverage for kids up to 19 years old. Coverage for eligible children includes checkups, hospital visits, dental coverage, immunizations and more. Find out if they’re eligible at InsureKidsNow.gov/chip.

Sometimes your kids don’t want to listen to mom or dad, but you want them to get information from a trusted source. Point them to the health resources on Kids.gov, where they can learn about everything from keeping their eyes safe to understanding germs and where they can play fun games that drive home the importance of brushing their teeth or getting their shots.

Find more free guides on managing your children’s health from infant to teen at Publications.USA.gov.

Webinar: Impact of Air Pollution on Children’s Health

Saturday, November 9th, 2013

WEBINAR: Impact of Air Pollution on Children’s Health

Presented by The Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment and the Virginia Healthy Air Coalition, a program of the American Lung Association

The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently classified air pollution as carcinogenic to humans, recognizing that outdoor air pollution is a leading environmental cause of cancer deaths.

How does air pollution impact children’s health? How are children’s lungs different from adults, and how does this influence their susceptibility to the adverse health effects of air pollution? Learn the major types and sources of air pollution and the health outcomes associated with each, as well as how to control and prevent sources of air pollution.

Health professionals and community organizations play a crucial role in addressing air pollution: they can use their experience and expertise to advocate for strong clean air laws. Learn what federal protections are currently in place under the Clean Air Act, how current and future legislation would change them, and how to get involved in the discussion to improve children’s health.

Date: December 4th, 2013

Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm

Cost: FREE

Who should participate? Public health professionals, environmental health professionals, clinicians, nurses, community organizations, health care professional organizations, child health advocates, and government agencies.

Speakers: Jerome A. Paulson, MD, FAAP

Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health

The George Washington University
Medical Director for National & Global Affairs
Child Health Advocacy Institute
Director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment

Children’s National Medical Center
Laura Kate Anderson Bender
Coordinator, Virginia Healthy Air Coalition
American Lung Association

In her role with the American Lung Association, Laura Kate Bender has built a coalition of public health and healthcare professionals across Virginia to advocate for clean air protections. The Healthy Air Campaign’s goals are to raise the profile of air pollution as a public health issue and to influence Virginia’s members of Congress in the national clean air debate. Previously, Laura Kate worked to further environmental protections in Virginia with the advocacy group Environment America. She studied at American University in Washington, DC.

To Join the Meeting:

1. Go to:  https://childrensnational.webex.com/childrensnational/onstage/g.php?d=669925740&t=a

2. Click “JOIN”.

Phone Option A: To have WebEx call you, select the “Call me at a new number” option and enter your telephone number.

Phone Option B: To manually dial into the meeting, select the “I will call in” option and follow the instructions listed, making sure to enter in the Meeting Number and your personalized attendee number.

1. Call conference number

Meeting Dial in Number:

US Toll Free 1-877-668-4493

2. Enter the meeting number/access code: 669 925 740

What is the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment (MACCHE)?

The Mid-Atlantic Center is the PEHSU for Federal Region III; serving all those who live and work in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Virginia and West Virginia.  We are located out of Children’s National Medical Center and affiliated with the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  We work with a variety of partners, including health care professional organizations, non-profits, community-based organizations and medical centers.  Since 2006, we have conducted over 400 trainings with over 25,000 in attendance. Learn more at: www.childrensnational.org/macche.

New Resources Focus on Health Coverage and Access to Care for Kids

Saturday, October 19th, 2013

The MCH Library at Georgetown University released a new knowledge path, Health Insurance and Access to Care for Children and Adolescents.  The knowledge path directs readers to a selection of resources that analyze data, describe effective programs, and report on policy and research aimed at advancing health coverage and improving health care access for children and adolescents. The knowledge path aims to help health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, and researchers learn more about the topic, to integrate what they know into their work in new ways to improve health coverage and access to care, for program development, and to locate training resources and information to answer specific questions. The knowledge path is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/KnowledgePaths/kp_insurance.html.

A separate brief presents resources to help families learn more about and locate health insurance and health care for their children. The brief is available at http://www.mchlibrary.org/families/frb_insurance.html.

Also see Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA): Resources for Professionals (http://www.mchlibrary.org/guides/ACA.html) and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA): Resources for Families (http://www.mchlibrary.org/families/frb_ACA.html) to learn more about the Affordable Care Act.

We welcome your comments and would appreciate your help in sharing this information with your colleagues via your website or e-news services.