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Archive for the ‘Evaluation’ Category

52 Weeks of Better Evaluation

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

BetterEvaluation.org is an international collaboration that encourages sharing of evaluation methods, approaches and processes for improvement. BetterEvaluation offers yearly blog themes for their staff and guest writers to focus on, and have wrapped up the highlights of their ’52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation’ 2014 theme in a post at http://betterevaluation.org/node/4682 For 2015 they are featuring ’12 Months of BetterEvaluation’ with multiple posts during a month, starting with impact evaluation in January.

A ‘top 5′ selection from the ‘52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation‘ post that is likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members includes

  • Top ten developments in qualitative evaluation over the past decade (link to part 1, part 2)
  • Fitting reporting methods to evaluation findings and audiences (link)
  • Infographics, including step by step instructions in piktochart (link)
  • Innovation in evaluation (link)
  • Presenting data effectively (link)

NLM Teleconference to Report on RFI and New Funding Mechanism for 2016-2021

Monday, January 26th, 2015

In May 2014, the National Library of Medicine posted a Request for Information (RFI) asking for ideas on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) (http://nnlm.gov) can more effectively and efficiently provide equal access to biomedical information and improve an individual’s access to health information.  Based on the feedback from nearly 50 respondents and a review of historical data related to the program, NLM will change the award mechanism for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Libraries’ cycle from contracts to cooperative agreements.  This type of funding mechanism will allow NLM to participate more fully in the work of the RMLs and better coordinate collaborative programs and projects.  A Notice of Intent was published on the NIH Grants & Funding site on January 22, 2015.

Join NLM in a teleconference to hear about the responses to the RFI and learn about Cooperative Agreements:

  • Tuesday, January 27, 2015 / 4 pm (ET)
  • Teleconference Number:  1-888-450-5996
  • Participant Passcode: 662939

The world’s largest biomedical library, the National Library of Medicine maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

Mapping an Outreach Project Webinar Series

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

MAR has teamed up with Outreach and Evaluation expert, Cindy Olney, from the NN/LM Outreach and Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) to offer a 4-part webinar series, eligible for up to 8 MLA CEs.

Mapping an Outreach Project:  Start with Information; End with a Plan is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service.  You will learn how assessment and evaluation can be effective tools for project planning and proposal writing.  Assessment enables you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project.  It also helps you build relationships with potential partners.  Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal.  This class will elaborate on information contained in the OERC Planning and Evaluation booklets.

  • Webinar 1:  January 12 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project

  • Webinar 2:  January 14 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Gather information about your target audience that is most effective for planning your project

  • Webinar 3:  January 26 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results

  • Webinar 4:  January 28 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full project proposal

These classes will be followed by a special 2-hour Grants and Proposal Writing course, offered online February 2nd / 10 am – Noon

Evaluation “Soundbites” from the CDC

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Want to build your repertoire of evaluation skills?  Check out Soundbites, a library of evaluation-related podcasts and webinars from the CDC’s Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention.  These are archived documents from 20-minute “coffee break” presentations about evaluation. The usual basic topics are represented, such as “Making Logic Models Work for You”  and “How Do I Develop a Survey?” But a number of the presentations cover topics that are not standard fare. Here are just a few titles that caught my eye:

Facilitation Skills for Evaluators – Getting the Most Out of Partnership Engagement

Using Qualitative Data to Share Programmatic Success 

Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Evaluation

Establishing a Baseline as Part of Your Evaluation

Communicating about Data

Most presentations consist of PDFs of PowerPoint slides and talking points, but there are a few podcasts as well.  All presentations seem to be bird’s-eye overviews, but the final slides offer transcripts of Q&A discussion and a list of resources for more in-depth exploration of the topic.  It’s a great way to check out a new evaluation interest!

Mobile Data Solutions Course

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Are you curious about the use of smart phones, tablets, or other mobile data resources to collect data for your assessment project, but are seeking more information on how to determine if this is the right approach for your project or program and how to process the data you collect using this method?

Check out http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/, which was created as part of the Mobile Solutions Technical Assistance and Research (mSTAR) project, with expertise provided by U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Digital Development Lab and designed by TechChange.

The primary goal of this freely available and accessible online course (free registration is required to access it) is to learn more about mobile tools, processes, and strategies for data collection in order to use mobile devices (referred to as mobile data solutions) to their full potential in doing so. The course will take about 2 hours to complete and can be done at your own pace over time. Your progress in the course is saved so you’ll be taken to the point where you stopped to continue learning the next time you access it.

The learning objectives of the course are

  • Describe examples of mobile data solutions from collection through visualization
  • Articulate the benefit of using these solutions
  • Analyze the challenges and limitations associated with mobile data solutions
  • Assess whether or not particular mobile data solutions are appropriate for a project, program or problem
  • Outline how to design a project or activity to include mobile data solutions
  • Explain the steps involved in implementing mobile data solutions
  • Summarize how to analyze, visualize, and share mobile data

Ring in 2015 with 8 MLA CEs, a Project Plan, and MAR Funding to Make it Happen!

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

MAR invites applications for our next round of funding opportunities which are due March 13, 2015.  Funding is designed to support our network members, as well as to encourage outreach activities aligned with the NN/LM mission to provide all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information, and improve the public’s access to information so they can make informed decisions about their health.

Libraries, information centers, health centers, community- and faith-based organizations, and others providing health information services are encouraged to apply for a variety of awards that:

  • improve health information services
  • increase awareness and access to biomedical information
  • educate and empower consumers to make informed decisions about their health
  • prepare librarians and staff to meet the needs and challenges of the changing healthcare environment

To coincide with this new round of funding, MAR has teamed up with Outreach and Evaluation expert, Cindy Olney, from the NN/LM Outreach and Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) to offer a 4-part webinar series, eligible for up to 8 MLA CEs.

Mapping an Outreach Project:  Start with Information; End with a Plan is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service.  You will learn how assessment and evaluation can be effective tools for project planning and proposal writing.  Assessment enables you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project.  It also helps you build relationships with potential partners.  Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal.  This class will elaborate on information contained in the OERC Planning and Evaluation booklets.

  • Webinar 1:  January 12:  Noon-1:00 pm

Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project

  • Webinar 2:  January 14:  Noon-1:00 pm

Gather information about your target audience that is most effective for planning your project

  • Webinar 3:  January 26:  Noon-1:00 pm

Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results

  • Webinar 4:  January 28:  Noon-1:00 pm

Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full project proposal

These classes will be followed by a special 2-hour Grants and Proposal Writing course, offered online February 2nd / 10 am – Noon.

These classes will focus special attention on applications for MAR funding.  However, information presented is relevant to many types of outreach and project proposals.

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

In September, the OERC blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.

Top 100 Altmetrics papers for 2014

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Here’s the Top 100 Altmetrics List for 2014 – the 100 papers with the highest scores as calculated by Altmetrics.

http://www.altmetric.com/top100/2014/?utm_source=announcement&utm_medium=emails&utm_term=2014top100&utm_campaign=top1002014emails

Rural Health Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

Friday, December 5th, 2014

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Rural and medically underserved areas often have challenges including both increased health disparities and population health issues combined with limited resources and healthcare providers to help meet these challenges. The use of appropriate program evaluation measures can help to assess what actually works for rural health settings since many evidence-based strategies are based on urban and non-rural populations.

The Rural Assistance Center (raconline.org) has recently issued a freely available online guide at http://www.raconline.org/topics/rural-health-research-assessment-evaluation The guide is intended to help an organization

  • Identifies the similarities and differences among rural health research, assessment, and evaluation
  • Discusses common methods, such as surveys and focus groups
  • Provides contacts within the field of rural health research
  • Addresses the importance of community-based participatory research to rural communities
  • Looks at the community health needs assessment (CHNA) requirements for non-profit hospitals and public health
  • Examines the importance of building the evidence-base so interventions conducted in rural areas have the maximum possible impact

Thanks to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Network member (what does that mean?) Gail Kouame from HEALWA for sharing this great resource with us at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC)! Do you have an evaluation-related resource to share? We would be happy to consider featuring it in our blog or possible inclusion in our Tools and Resources guide at guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools.