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Archive for the ‘Evaluation’ Category

Value of the Library to Society

Monday, September 8th, 2014

http://theweek.com/article/index/265775/what-the-death-of-the-library-means-for-the-future-of-books

Is There a Shortage of Qualified Librarians for the Future’s Needs?

Monday, September 8th, 2014

“Labor shortages also will hit shrinking and slow-growing professions such as plant operators, librarians and sea captains because there simply aren’t enough young workers to fill the remaining positions after current workers retire.”

Well, I think out there in I-Need-a-Job Land there is a disconnect with many people thinking information and communication technologies (and, sadly, a general dumbing down of the US in math, science, and reading) is making librarianship obsolete. There should be more than rays of hope in this.

http://online.wsj.com/articles/help-wanted-librarians-sea-captains-1409631004

Designing Library Data Dashboards with Tableau Software

Monday, September 8th, 2014

At last month’s Library Assessment Conference held in Seattle, one panel featured assessment librarians presenting data dashboards they created using Tableau software, Tableau Unleashed: Visualizing Library Data. This presentation includes views of dashboards from University of British Columbia Library (by presenter Jeremy Buhler), UMass Amherst Libraries (by Rachel Lewellen), and Ohio State Libraries (by Sarah Murphy). All of the presenters used Tableau software to produce their dashboards.

Tableau may be the most popular software for creating dashboards right now and the company offers a free version that has a great deal of functionality. In fact, at least one presenter (Sarah Murphy) included dashboards she created using Tableau Public. However, users must be cautioned that any data entered into Tableau Public become public information. That means anyone can see and download your raw data. So, if you use it, be sure all identifying information about individuals is stripped from your files and that you are comfortable with other people downloading your raw data. The presenters also mentioned tips for dashboard design. For additional design guidance, check out the freely downloadable resource A Guide to Creating Dashboards People Love to Use by Juice Analytics.

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

Monday, September 8th, 2014

Library Journal and School Library Journal invite you to participate in our 5th annual, online conference:

The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center

<http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/>.

 

This free event provide answers to some of the biggest challenges libraries face in the transformation of our culture from analog experiences to digital experiences. This daylong professional development conference can be viewed in groups or privately. There are no travel or registration fees, and attendees will connect with each other as well as hear exciting keynotes from award-winning scientist and NY Times Best Selling author author Daniel J. Levitin, PhD (Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in an Age of Information Overload) , and Anil Dash, cofounder and CEO of ThinkUp <https://www.thinkup.com/>, that will examine our shared digital future.

 

Our lineup of expert speakers and panelists will present innovative tools and ideas for and from libraries of all types. The day features different tracks dedicated to K-12, Academic, and Public, allowing for the day to be completely customizable. The day will focus on three key areas:

 

  • Content, Containers and Beyond
  • How libraries are creating, curating, and licensing, digitizing, archiving, and delivering content in today’s fast-changing digital world.
  • Collaboration and Innovation
  • How libraries are repositioning themselves as the digital nexus for theircommunities.
  • Leading the Learning Revolution
  • How libraries serve as essential links in a learning continuum.

 

Libraries @ the Center (#TDS14) <http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/> includes sessions on:

 

  • StatBase: Open source data management for libraries

 

  • Partnering with Small Organizations to Digitize Local Content

 

  • Bridging the K12-College Information Literacy Gap

 

  • Digital Strategies for Job Search Training

 

  • Hack Your Notebook: Leveraging Libraries for STEM-Literacy
  • Connections

 

  • Identifying and Delivering Meta-Literacy Skill Sets to Adult
  • Learners

 

  • Making Space for Play

 

More information is available online at http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/.

August 2014 Crossroads: The Learning Place for Libraries

Friday, August 15th, 2014

http://visit.oclc.org/dm?id=EBED0BE547219A995A037A3C371A0A773C0FD08FC96537AC

Re-skilling for Research

Monday, August 11th, 2014

New Report from RLUK “Re-skilling for Research” Looks at Changing Needs of Researchers and Effects on Libraries: http://www.infodocket.com/2012/02/01/new-report-from-rluk-re-skilling-for-research-looks-at-changing-needs-of-researchers/

Data Visualizations at Information is Beautiful

Monday, August 11th, 2014

National Network of Libraries of Medicine

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

The OERC will be attending the Library Assessment Conference at University of Washington this week, where we will be learning about new trends in library assessment, evaluation, and improvement. Stayed tuned to our blog and we will pass along what we learn. The LAC is sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries.

In the meantime, I want to leave you with a fun data visualization site to explore while we’re gone.  David McCandless creates wonderful infographics for his site “Information is Beautiful.”  Many are health-related. All are gorgeous.  You can find the list of data visualizations here.

The Value Study as a Tool for Library Advocacy (Boost Box session)

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Presenters:

  • Joanne Gard Marshall, Distinguished Research Professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Julia Sollenberger, Associate Vice President and Director, Medical Center Libraries and Technologies, University of Rochester Medical Center

Date / Time: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:             https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required

Summary: The speakers will present the results of the Value Study the most useful for library advocacy and discuss how results are being used by librarians across the country. Over 16,000 physicians, residents and nurses served by 56 libraries participated in the study. As a result, the findings can be used by both participating and non-participating libraries.

Librarians are using the results to advocate for the importance of the library through posters, presentations, newsletters and personal contacts with administrators, educators and clinicians. Time saved by health professionals is also being also converted into dollars saved to show cost-effectiveness. Our examples show that librarians are using the results, but customizing their advocacy efforts so that they have maximum impact on their institution.

Librarians are making frequent use of the resources available on the Value Study website: http://nnlm.gov/mar/about/value.html, containing an overview of the study results suitable for presentation. Librarians are welcome to use the full presentation or key slides as needed.  Specialized PowerPoint summary reports are also available based on geographic region, as well as AAHSL and non-AAHSL sites, and the profession of respondents. The site provides access to the data and all supporting materials, including the survey. Features encourage data use, benchmarking with similar types of libraries, as well as study replication. Links to peer reviewed journal articles based on the study results are also available on the site. Two new publications, one in a nursing journal and one in a health care management journal are about to appear. Results from these additional analyses will be discussed.

NTIS Reports of Possible Interest

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values.

Report produced in 2014 by the Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

A White House report on big data released May 1 concludes that the explosion of data in today’s world can be an unprecedented driver of social progress, but it also has the potential to eclipse basic civil rights and privacy protections. The report drew praise from business and technology groups for its grasp of how big data analytics could improve education and healthcare, uncover wasteful government spending, and help with the nation’s continuing economic recovery. But those same groups cautioned that government attempts to regulate data collection could interfere with productivity and job growth.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis.

Report produced in 2013 by the National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Mathematical Sciences.

Experiments, observations, and numerical simulations in many areas of science and business are currently generating terabytes of data, and in some cases are on the verge of generating petabytes and beyond. Analyses of the information contained in these data sets have already led to major breakthroughs in fields ranging from genomics to astronomy and high-energy physics and to the development of new information-based industries. Traditional methods of analysis have been based largely on the assumption that analysts can work with data within the confines of their own computing environment, but the growth of big data is changing that paradigm, especially in cases in which massive amounts of data are distributed across locations. While the scientific community and the defense enterprise have long been leaders in generating and using large data sets, the emergence of e-commerce and massive search engines has led other sectors to confront the challenges of massive data.

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

 

Data Mining Meets HCI: Making Sense of Large Graphs.

Report produced in 2012 by Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Machine Learning Department.

We have entered the age of big data. Massive datasets are now common in science, government and enterprises. Yet, making sense of these data remains a fundamental challenge. Where do we start our analysis. Where to go next. How to visualize our findings. We answers these questions by bridging Data Mining and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to create tools for making sense of graphs with billions of nodes and edges, focusing on (1) Attention Routing: we introduce this idea, based on anomaly detection, that automatically draws people’s attention to interesting areas of the graph to start their analyses. We present three examples Polonium unearths malware from 37 billion machine- file relationships NetProbe fingers bad guys who commit auction fraud. (2) Mixed-Initiative Sensemaking: we present two examples that combine machine inference and visualization to help users locate next areas of interest: Apolo guides users to explore large graphs by learning from few examples of user interest; Graphite finds interesting subgraphs, based on only fuzzy descriptions drawn graphically. (3) Scaling Up: we show how to enable interactive analytics of large graphs by leveraging Hadoop, staging of operations, and approximate computation. This thesis contributes to data mining, HCI, and importantly their intersection, including: interactive systems and algorithms that scale theories that unify graph mining approaches; and paradigms that overcome fundamental challenges in visual analytics. Our work is making impact to academia and society: Polonium protects 120 million people worldwide from malware; NetProbe made headlines on CNN, WSJ and USA Today; Pegasus won an open source software award; Apolo helps DARPA detect insider threats and prevent exfiltration. We hope our Big Data Mantra ‘Machine for Attention Routing Human for Interaction’ will inspire more innovations at the crossroad of data mining and HCI.

 

For NTIS Customers click here / For NTRL Customers click here

Freebie Friday: Shaping Outcomes Course

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Do you want to learn more about outcomes-based planning and evaluation (OBPE) for your outreach project but there’s no money in the training budget to do so?

Shaping Outcomes: Making a Difference in Libraries and Museums (shapingoutcomes.org) is available as a free online course that learners can start anytime and work on at their own self-navigated pace. While there are library and museum-specific examples provided in the course the concepts of learning more about target audience needs, how to clarify desired results, developing logic models and evaluating outcomes are applicable for most other organizations’ outreach projects as well.

Modules of the class are broken into five sections (Overview, Plan, Build, Evaluate, Report) with a helpful Glossary to learn OBPE terminology and a Logic Model template. Shaping Outcomes was developed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) and previously was available as an instructor-led class.

More information specific to developing logic models in health information outreach programs is available from Booklet Two: Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects, part of our resources on our Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) Evaluation Guides page at http://nnlm.gov/evaluation/guides.html.