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Archive for the ‘Evaluation’ Category

Check Out Our Fall Issue of The MAReport!

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Articles of Interest from Journal of Hospital Librarianship

Friday, November 14th, 2014

You may have seen that these articles are freely available from the Journal of Hospital Librarianship.  They describe new ways hospital librarians can market their services to their hospital community.

Christine Monie & Jessica Clark (2013) Promoting the Library through an Electronic Table of Contents (e-TOC) E-mail Service: The Wollongong Experience, Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 13:1, 32-41.  This article discusses taking the initiative to reach out to members of your constituent groups to “help and supply” instead of waiting for a request for a service.

Jennifer E. Moyer (2013) Managing Mobile Devices in Hospitals: A Literature Review of BYOD Policies and Usage, Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 13:3, 197-208.  The authors discuss how the hospital librarian can become an essential collaborator in managing mobile devices in the institution including training and content support.

Literature Search Strategy Week at AEA

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

Literature Search Strategy Week at AEA

We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have previously covered the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) tip-a-day blog at http://aea365.org/blog as a helpful resource. This week posts about literature search strategies were shared on the AEA blog by Network member librarians from the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Have you been involved in a similar collaboration? Please let us know, we’d love to feature your work in a future OERC blog post!

Literature Search Strategy Week

  • Best Databases – learn the most effective starting points for biomedical, interdisciplinary, specialized, and a handy Top Ten list of literature databases.
  • Constructing a Literature Search – learn the value of a vocabulary roadmap, and the difference between keyword and controlled vocabulary searching.
  • Grey Literature – strategies for understanding these non-traditional but highly valuable information resources and starting points on where to find them.
  • Using MyNCBI – learn how to sign up for your free account, save your PubMed search strategies, receive email updates, customize your display and more.
  • Citation Management – featuring both freely available and other options you may have access to through your academic organizations.

A Free Virtual Bulletin Board and Brainstorming Tool

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

A recent AEA365 Evaluation Tip-a-Day featured a review and several hot tips for Padlet, a freely available web-based bulletin board system. The hot tips include the use of Padlet as an anonymous brainstorming activity in response to a question or idea, and as a backchannel for students or conference attendees to share resources and raise questions for future discussion. Padlet’s bulletin board configuration settings are intuitive and easy to use with various backgrounds and freeform, tabular, or grid note arrangement display on the bulletin board.

Free Padlet accounts can be created by either signing up directly or by linking to an existing Google or Facebook account.  Padlet includes many privacy options that are clearly explained, including “Private” mode, requiring the use of a password for you and those you invite to participate to access the Padlet, and “Public” mode to view, write or moderate. A new update feature includes a variety of ways to share Padlet data, ranging from choosing the icon for six different social media channels to downloading data as a PDF or Excel/CSV file for analysis.

For a trial run of this resource, visit the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center’s Padlet about the OERC Evaluation Series booklets and leave your input! Posts will be moderated on the Padlet before they display publicly.

NLM Associate Fellowship Program 2015

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is accepting applications for its Associate Fellowship program, a one-year training program for recent MLS graduates and librarians early in their career.

In the first half of the year, a formal curriculum offers exposure to library operations, research and development, intramural and extramural research, development and lifecycle of NLM’s web-based products and services and the extensive outreach and education program reaching consumers, special populations, health professionals and librarians. In the second half of the year, Associate Fellows have the opportunity to choose projects based on real-world problems proposed by library divisions and work with librarians and library staff over a six-seven month period. Successful projects have led to peer-review publications and to services that have become a regular part of library operations.

The September through August program also offers professional development and an introduction to the wider world of health sciences librarianship that may include:

  • Supported attendance at national professional conferences, often including the Medical Library Association’s annual meeting, the American Medical Informatics Association annual meeting and others
  • Additional brown bags, seminars, field trips and learning opportunities available on the National Institutes of Health campus
  • Opportunities to meet and interact with senior management at the National Library of Medicine
  • Experienced preceptors from National Library of Medicine staff
  • Potential to compete for a second year fellowship at a health sciences library in the United States

The Fellowship offers:

  • A stipend equivalent to a U.S. Civil Service salary at the GS-9 level ($52,146 in 2014)
  • Additional financial support for the purchase of health insurance
  • Some relocation funding

Who is eligible?
All U.S. and Canadian citizens who will have earned a MLS or equivalent degree in library/information science from an ALA-accredited school by August 2015. Both recent graduates and librarians early in their career are welcome to apply. Priority is given to U.S. citizens.

Applications and additional information are available on the Web at www.nlm.nih.gov/about/training/associate/. Application deadline is February 5, 2015. Between 4 and 7 fellows will be selected for the program.

Feel free to contact Kathel Dunn, Associate Fellowship Program Coordinator at 301-435.4083 or kathel.dunn@nih.gov

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Talking to Health Care Providers about Patient Health Literacy

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

By Yawar Ali and Cindy Olney

As the child of a physician living in South Texas, I’ve witnessed a deficiency of health literacy in patients. I volunteered in my dad’s clinic over spring break. I also participated on a medical relief trip with my father to a nonprofit charitable hospital in Pakistan. At both places, I witnessed difficulty in patient health literacy. – Yawar Ali

 In June 2014, Yawar Ali, a rising junior from the South Texas High School for Health Professions, taught physicians and physician assistants in his father’s medical clinics about patient health literacy. He also introduced them to MedlinePlus as an important tool for their patients. Yawar evaluated his project and discovered valuable insight that helped him improve the impact of his project.

Yawar conducted this health information outreach project as an internship offered through the  ¡VIVA! (Vital Information for a Virtual Age) project.  ¡VIVA! is a high school-based initiative in which students are trained to promote MedlinePlus to their classmates, teachers, families, and community members.  It is a student organization led by librarians of the South Texas Independent School District, located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) funds the project.

He developed his presentation using health literacy materials available through the Medical Library Association and presented to three doctors and three PAs.  He taught them seven steps for addressing low patient health literacy and introduced them to MedlinePlus.

Yawar incorporated elegantly simple evaluation techniques into his project. Right after the presentation, he asked participants to complete a short evaluation form, asking them how likely they were to use the steps and promote MedlinePlus to patients.  They all responded positively, indicating good intentions.

Two weeks after the training, Yawar visited all of the health care providers to conduct brief semi-structured interviews. He asked if they had tried the steps and collected their feedback on the techniques. He also checked to see if they had promoted MedlinePlus to their patients. With some persistence, he was able to conduct a complete interview with each participant.

The feedback he received is of interest to anyone hoping to initiate health information outreach in partnership with primary care clinics, particularly in medically underserved areas:

  • The majority of Yawar’s participants tried teach-back, open-ended questions, and other techniques with their patients; but they were conflicted because such techniques added time to patient appointments. This interfered with their ability to stick to their busy schedules.
  • The health care providers were impressed with MedlinePlus, but they had convenient access to print materials from a database (Healthwise) that was integrated with the clinic’s Electronic Health Records (EHR) system. Furthermore, it was easier to document that they were adhering to the meaningful use requirements of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs when they got patient information from Healthwise.
  • While the Healthwise database was more convenient for the providers, they recognized that the print information they were providing was limited. They believed their patients could get more comprehensive information from MedlinePlus, but the clinicians did not have a convenient way to promote the resource.

Their feedback prompted a speedy response. The project team secured MedlinePlus brochures from NLM that Yawar delivered to the clinics. The fix was relatively simple, but critical. The team may have never known about this necessary adjustment without Yawar’s elegantly simple evaluation.

Credit:  Yawar and Cindy would like to thank ¡VIVA! project team members Lucy Hansen, Sara Reibman, and Ann Vickman, for their help on this project.

The ¡VIVA! project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health, under Contract No. HHSN-276-2011-0007-C with the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library.

Audit an Evaluation MOOC

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Have you always been curious about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and haven’t yet checked them out, or have started a MOOC and not completed it because you found the format confusing or didn’t have the time to complete all the assignments in it?

Evaluating Social Programs is currently being offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) within one of the easier-to-navigate open access MOOC formats, EdX. The course is now closed for registration for credit, but can still be accessed for free to audit with complete access to the instructional materials, activities, tests and discussions within the MOOC. It is estimated that full participation in each week of the course will take approximately 4 hours, but of course you are welcome to skip around and access the information that is of interest to you. I am currently auditing the MOOC while taking note of new resources and information that is likely to be of interest to you from a health program evaluation perspective this month, and will write a summary blog post in November.

The class description is:

This four and a half-week course on evaluating social programs will provide a thorough understanding of randomized evaluations and pragmatic step-by-step training for conducting one’s own evaluation. Through a combination of lectures and case studies from real randomized evaluations, the course will focus on the benefits and methods of randomization, choosing an appropriate sample size, and common threats and pitfalls to the validity of the experiment. While the course is centered around the why, how and when of Randomized Evaluations, it will also impart insights on the importance of a needs assessment, measuring outcomes effectively, quality control, and monitoring methods that are useful for all kinds of evaluations.

If you are interested in participating in Evaluating Social Programs and have not previously taken an EdX MOOC, I highly recommend checking out the 15 minute self-navigated DemoX which provides a very user-friendly overview of how to make the best use of the features within EdX.

Qualitative Data Visualization

Friday, October 10th, 2014

An innovative and compelling approach to creating qualitative data visualizations with illustrations is provided by Fresh Spectrum. The process begins by taking a long narrative such as a focus group transcription, and chunking it into a few paragraphs per concept with a unique illustration for each one. One option is to use your organization’s existing images or Creative Commons-licensed images for illustrating concepts. The next step for the visualization uses the images with brief captions as an online data dashboard, where visitors can click on the captioned image of interest to them to access the more detailed narrative. One example describes how to do this within a WordPress portfolio blog template, or a simpler strategy of creating HTML anchor links to each individual section within a longer text, which then leads to the longer narrative.

The NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) has more resources available from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of the OERC Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide.

Qualitative Data Visualization

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

Have you thought that only quantitative information can be used for data visualizations, and qualitative data wasn’t an option without first coding or otherwise turning this valuable content into quantitative formats?

I learned about an innovative and compelling approach to creating qualitative data visualizations with illustrations from Fresh Spectrum . They begin the process (as shown in the illustration above) of taking a long narrative such as a focus group transcription, and chunking it into a few paragraphs per concept with a unique illustration for each one. In this case custom illustrations of people were used, but you could use your organization’s existing images or Creative Commons-licensed images for illustrating concepts. The next step for the visualization uses the images with brief captions as an online data dashboard, where visitors can click on the captioned image of interest to them to then access the more detailed narrative. The author describes how to do this within a WordPress portfolio blog template, or a simpler strategy of creating HTML anchor links to each individual section within a longer text. You can see how this works by clicking on an anchor link from the original post (http://freshspectrum.com/blogging-advice/#davidson for example) that leads to the longer narrative at http://freshspectrum.com/blogging-advice/ (a great source of advice for blogging by the way!)

Need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions and comments about the guide.

My NCBI – ORCID Author Data Integration with SciENcv

Friday, September 26th, 2014

SciENcv users will soon be able to create SciENcv profiles using the data stored in their ORCID records. By linking an ORCID account to an NCBI account, users will be able to create SciENcv profiles using the personal statement, education, employment, publications and research awards information stored in ORCID records.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_sciencv_orcid.html