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Archive for the ‘Evaluation’ Category

Teleconference Today—Interested in Leading the Regional Medical Library Program?

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) seeks candidates with experience in program coordination and health information policy for a Supervisory Librarian to lead our Regional Medical Library program.

If you are interested in this position, we strongly encourage you to attend our informational webinar on February 23, 2015 from 3 – 4 pm (ET).

Click here to register

The Head of the National Network Office (NNO) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) serves as a national leader in developing collaborations among libraries in the Network.

The NNO Head is responsible for monitoring, evaluating, and advising on all aspects of biomedical information provision, for outreach to groups experiencing health disparities, and for the provision of access to medical information in emergency and disaster situations (national and international).  The Head also advises on public health information policy issues related to programs conducted throughout the Network.

NLM is in the process of transitioning our agreements with the Regional Medical Libraries from a contract funding mechanism to a grant cooperative agreement.  The Head will serve as Chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the organizations awarded these cooperative agreements.

As a supervisory librarian at the GS-15 level, the position has a salary range of $126,245-$158,700, and reports to the Associate Director for Library Operations, Joyce Backus.

NLM will begin accepting applications for this position in early March.  At that time, we will release a second announcement with a link to the actual application.

We hope that you will consider applying for this exciting leadership opportunity.

If you have any additional questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!

METRO Webinar: Taking Ownership at Work

Friday, February 20th, 2015

No one wants to be micromanaged. We want to be trusted and given space in the workplace, even when we work as part of a team. Plenty of studies say that increasing employee responsibility and accountability through autonomy will improve both quality of work and employee satisfaction — a two-in-one proposition!

But what if our bosses simply aren’t buying into it? This is where independent ownership comes in.

There are lots of ways to exercise personal ownership on an individual level, no matter the circumstances. Proactive problem solving is one example. We’ve all had workplace conversations that turn into gripe sessions. Venting pent up frustrations feels good and can help us articulate exactly where the problem is. However, although we might feel stuck in the moment, there is almost always something we can do to solve the problem. Moving past frustration and onto an actionable next step is what we mean by “taking ownership.”

Having limited authority doesn’t need to short circuit our ability to be proactive. Take ownership over what you can. Innovate on a small scale and ask for what you need!

Of course, taking action to resolve issues in the workplace does carry some risk. Odds are that we’ll make at least one poor decision somewhere down the line. But forward steps bear so much more reward than standing still ever will.

Instructor Kimberly Sweetman will talk more about ownership, autonomy, and how to implement them during Library Professionals in the 21st Century Workplace at METRO on Monday, March 2nd.

Opportunity to Affect the Future of the National Library of Medicine

Friday, February 13th, 2015

You have a unique opportunity to affect the future of the National Library of Medicine. As Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg retires after 30 years as director of NLM, Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, has convened a “Working Group to Chart the Course for the NIH National Library of Medicine.” The group’s charge and members: http://www.nih.gov/about/director/02032015_working-group_nlm.htm.

Consider responding to this time-sensitive NIH Request for Information (RFI), soliciting input into the deliberations of the working group of the advisory committee to the NIH Director. This is a very important opportunity to contribute feedback of the value of the National Library of Medicine, and to directly influence the future of this organization.

Your response must be submitted electronically at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/rfi/rfi.cfm?ID=41, and will ONLY be accepted through March 13, 2015.

Please share this information with colleagues and friends who might wish to respond with thoughts about how the NLM, and especially the collections, programs, and resources, have contributed to their research, teaching, education, and professional development.

Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

Friday, February 13th, 2015

NISO Two-Part March Webinar: Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

Part 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content

Date: March 11, 2015

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Eastern time

Event webpage: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/granularity_pt1/

 

Part 2:  The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery

Date: March 18, 2015

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Eastern time

Event webpage: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/granularity_pt2/

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NISO will be holding a two-part webinar on March 11 and 18 to explore the question, Is Granularity the Next Discovery Frontier?

The rise of the Discovery System in the library world has helped to streamline searching for end users by providing them with search functionality that more closely resembles search engines like Google than traditional database searches. But with this streamlined search comes added expectations from users about their ability to drill down into content and retrieve more granular pieces of information—anything from book chapters and individual letters to the editor to specific graphs and images could conceivably be retrieved in a more granular search.

Users are beginning to expect more granular search and access in Discovery System searches — encyclopedia articles, images, tables, book chapters. The implications for discovery system providers, content providers, and libraries to realize this vision are significant. These granular “objects” each have to be retrievable separately from the parent object and each has to have its own metadata and indexing. What is needed to ensure that discovery systems can retrieve and display information below the publication or article level? What is the role of the content provider and the library in this scenario? How do libraries help end users find and use this content?

This two-part NISO Webinar for March will examine the many implications of an increasingly granular discovery environment.

ABOUT PART 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content

In Part 1: Supporting Direct Access to Increasingly Granular Chunks of Content, this webinar will discuss the implications of granular content for user search interfaces and discovery engines.

Topics and speakers are:

  • Working with Metadata Challenges to Support Granular Levels of Access and Descriptions – Myung-Ja Han, Assistant Professor/Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois
  • How Discovery Services are Meeting Evolving Granular Discovery User Needs – Tito Sierra, Director of Product Management, EBSCO Information Services

ABOUT PART 2: The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery

Part 2 will look at The Business Complexities of Granular Discovery, and presenters will discuss the implications of granular content​ discovery for the business side of the equation.

Topics and speakers are:

  • Enabling discoverability into specific segments of multimedia– Andrea Eastman-Mullins, Chief Operating Officer, Alexander Street Press
  • The Business side of Making Granular Discovery Work  – Dan Valen, Product Specialist, figshare

REGISTRATION

Registration is per site (access for one computer) and closes at 12:00 pm Eastern on March 11 for Part 1 and March 18 for Part 2 (the days of the webinars). Discounts are available for NISO and NASIG members and students.

NISO Library Standards Alliance (LSA) members receive one free connection as part of membership and do not need to register. (The LSA member webinar contact will automatically receive the login information. Members are listed here:www.niso.org/about/roster/#library_standards_alliance. If you would like to become an LSA member and receive the entire year’s webinars as part of membership, information on joining is listed here: www.niso.org/about/join/alliance/.)

All webinar registrants and LSA webinar contacts receive access to the recorded version for one year. You can register for either or both parts. There is a 25% discount if registering for both. Visit the event webpages to register and for more information:
Part 1: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/granularity_pt1/
Part 2: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2015/webinars/granularity_pt2/

Value of Academic Libraries (from ACRL)

Monday, February 9th, 2015

http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/?p=786#more-%27

Another Coffee Break: Word and Excel Templates

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Here at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) we began 2015 blogging about the CDC Coffee Breaks. For February we’re offering a refill by featuring some notes from a recent American Evaluation Association (AEA) coffee break webcast. Unlike the CDC, the 20 minute AEA coffee break webcasts are not freely available to the public but are an included benefit of AEA membership. The webcast briefly covered best practices in data visualization using two commonly available resources (Microsoft Word and Excel) and how to automate use of them by creating templates for report format consistency and easier workflow.

Some great resources to learn more how to do this and bookmark for future reference include

Specific for Word

Specific for Excel

52 Weeks of Better Evaluation

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

BetterEvaluation.org is an international collaboration that encourages sharing of evaluation methods, approaches and processes for improvement. BetterEvaluation offers yearly blog themes for their staff and guest writers to focus on, and have wrapped up the highlights of their ’52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation’ 2014 theme in a post at http://betterevaluation.org/node/4682 For 2015 they are featuring ’12 Months of BetterEvaluation’ with multiple posts during a month, starting with impact evaluation in January.

A ‘top 5′ selection from the ‘52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation‘ post that is likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members includes

  • Top ten developments in qualitative evaluation over the past decade (link to part 1, part 2)
  • Fitting reporting methods to evaluation findings and audiences (link)
  • Infographics, including step by step instructions in piktochart (link)
  • Innovation in evaluation (link)
  • Presenting data effectively (link)

NLM Teleconference to Report on RFI and New Funding Mechanism for 2016-2021

Monday, January 26th, 2015

In May 2014, the National Library of Medicine posted a Request for Information (RFI) asking for ideas on how the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) (http://nnlm.gov) can more effectively and efficiently provide equal access to biomedical information and improve an individual’s access to health information.  Based on the feedback from nearly 50 respondents and a review of historical data related to the program, NLM will change the award mechanism for the 2016-2021 Regional Medical Libraries’ cycle from contracts to cooperative agreements.  This type of funding mechanism will allow NLM to participate more fully in the work of the RMLs and better coordinate collaborative programs and projects.  A Notice of Intent was published on the NIH Grants & Funding site on January 22, 2015.

Join NLM in a teleconference to hear about the responses to the RFI and learn about Cooperative Agreements:

  • Tuesday, January 27, 2015 / 4 pm (ET)
  • Teleconference Number:  1-888-450-5996
  • Participant Passcode: 662939

The world’s largest biomedical library, the National Library of Medicine maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology.

Public Access Compliance Monitor

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

The Public Access Compliance Monitor (PACM or “compliance monitor”) is a service from the National Library of Medicine that helps users at NIH-funded institutions locate and track the compliance of funded papers with the NIH Public Access Policy at an institutional level. Whether you are looking for a quick snapshot of your institution’s compliance rate or want to take an active role in helping your investigators comply with the policy, PACM can help you get the information you need.

To gain access to the compliance monitor, users must first be assigned a compliance reports role (“PACR”) role by an administrator at their institution who is authorized to assign roles in the NIH eRA Commons grants administration system. Users with a PACR role will then have access to the compliance reports for their institution.

PACM provides users with a list of all PubMed citations associated with an institution’s NIH funding and classifies the articles according to compliance status (i.e., Compliant, Non-Compliant, In Process). The compliance monitor also provides detailed information about each article including:

  • a full citation including the PMID (PubMed ID) and link to the PubMed record
  • associated grants and principal investigators
  • NIHMSID (NIH Manuscript Submission Reference Number), where available
  • PMCID (PubMed Central ID), where available
  • key names and dates in the NIHMS, where available
  • article compliance status
  • method A status
  • journal publisher

Compliance reports can be downloaded from these lists and the data filtered based on an institution’s needs.

For more information on the PACR role, the compliance monitor, and the available reports, see the User Guide. Additonally, an overview video of PACM from The NIH Public Access Policy for Librarians Webinar and a four-minute Look at the NIH Public Access Policy Compliance Monitor are available.

Mapping an Outreach Project Webinar Series

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

MAR has teamed up with Outreach and Evaluation expert, Cindy Olney, from the NN/LM Outreach and Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) to offer a 4-part webinar series, eligible for up to 8 MLA CEs.

Mapping an Outreach Project:  Start with Information; End with a Plan is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service.  You will learn how assessment and evaluation can be effective tools for project planning and proposal writing.  Assessment enables you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project.  It also helps you build relationships with potential partners.  Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal.  This class will elaborate on information contained in the OERC Planning and Evaluation booklets.

  • Webinar 1:  January 12 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project

  • Webinar 2:  January 14 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Gather information about your target audience that is most effective for planning your project

  • Webinar 3:  January 26 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results

  • Webinar 4:  January 28 / Noon – 1:00 pm (ET)

Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full project proposal

These classes will be followed by a special 2-hour Grants and Proposal Writing course, offered online February 2nd / 10 am – Noon