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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

NLM Releases Rare Footage of President Franklin Roosevelt Speaking at NIH

Friday, October 10th, 2014

On October 31, 1940, just days before President Franklin D. Roosevelt would be elected to an unprecedented third term as President of the United States, he traveled to Bethesda to dedicate the National Cancer Institute and the new campus of what was then the National Institute of Health (NIH), before it would eventually become known in plural form, National Institutes of Health, as multiple units were established over subsequent years. That late October afternoon, Roosevelt stood on the steps of the new main NIH building, ready to address a crowd of 3,000 people. Still relevant today, in a variety of contexts, are the subjects he discussed: the need for preparedness in light of war and for research into deadly diseases, recent improvements in public health and health care, and hope that the research conducted at NIH would lead to new cures for and even the prevention of disease.

The National Library of Medicine is making the film of Roosevelt’s speech publicly available online for the first time, nearly 74 years after the President made his speech. Sound recordings, transcripts, and photographs of this event have been publicly available for many years. Research suggests, however, that this rare film footage has not been seen publicly since its recording and may no longer exist anywhere else. The recording does not appear to have been professionally produced, since the camera is unsteady in places, a hand sweeps across the lens, and the filming starts and stops, though it isn’t known whether this is a result of the original filming or of later editing. The film is publicly available via the NLM’s Digital Collections archive of over 10,000 biomedical books and videos, and its YouTube site. Read more about this historically significant film footage on the NLM blog, Circulating Now: From the Historical Collections of the World’s Largest Biomedical Library.

Got Coverage? Need Coverage? Getting Health Insurance During the Open Enrollment Period (Lunch with the RML session)

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Presenter:  Jennifer Syria, Health Insurance Specialist, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Boston Regional Office

Date / Time:  Tuesday, October 28, 2014 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:            https://webmeeting.nih.gov/lunch2/

Online / No Registration Required

 

Summary:  During the next few months, millions of Americans will need to decide how they would like to receive their health care coverage in 2015. This webinar will focus on the Health Insurance Marketplace Open Enrollment Period and review the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period. Discussion will include important information regarding the types of notices individuals will receive, consumer messaging, and the ways libraries can help inform individuals of their health care options. This webinar will provide valuable information for libraries in both the Middle Atlantic and New England Regions.

 

IMPORTANT NOTES:

  • This session will be meeting on a Tuesday, rather than our typical Thursday time slot
  • We will offer 1 MLA Continuing Education (CE) credit for this single session

Ebola Outbreak: Managing Health Information Resources

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

WHAT:  Disaster Information Specialists Program monthly conference call/webinar

WHEN:  Thursday, October 9, 2014 at 1:30 PM ET

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE:  The Disaster Information Specialist monthly meeting is open to everyone – please spread the word and invite others in your organizations, send to your email lists, and post to your social media accounts.

TOPIC:    Ebola Outbreak: Managing Health Information Resources

The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak has resulted in an explosion of information on many aspects of managing the disease from a clinical and public health perspective. There is also considerable interest in related topics such as legalities of quarantine; ethics of vaccine development; shaming and isolation of Ebola survivors, family members of the deceased and Ebola orphans; food security; and the effects on healthcare for other medical conditions in areas with extremely limited resources. How does one make sense of the outpouring of information from news media, social media, publications and guidelines from international agencies, national governments, NGOs, and professional associations; situation reports; maps and other tools for visualizing the outbreak? What about health messaging materials like infographics, radio jingles, banners, TV interviews, and webinars? Join us to discuss the nature of information flow during an infectious disease outbreak, with a special focus on Ebola-related resources from the National Library of Medicine.

Presenter:  Cindy Love is a medical librarian with over 20 years’ experience in public health information management at the National Library of Medicine. As part of the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center, Cindy has developed information resources for every major U.S. and international disaster in the last 5 years. She first co-authored a bibliography on “Viral Hemorrhagic Fever” in 1996. It ranks #8,569,688 on Amazon’s list of bestselling books.

LOGIN:   To join the meeting at 1:30 pm ET, Thursday, October 9, click on https://webmeeting.nih.gov/disinfo

  • Enter your name in the guest box and click “Enter Room”.
  • A box should pop up asking for your phone number.
  • Enter your phone number and the system will call you.
  • For those who cannot use this call-back feature, the dial-in information is:
  • Dial-In:  1-888-757-2790
  • Pass-Code: 745907

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If you have never attended an Adobe Connect Pro meeting before:

Test your connection: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

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MORE INFORMATION:  For more information on this and past meetings: http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dismeetings.html

Hope you can join us!

Elizabeth Norton, MLS, MPH, MBA

Disaster Information Management Research Center

Specialized Information Services Division

National Library of Medicine

6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 510

Bethesda, MD 20892-5467

nortone@nlm.nih.gov

http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov

Send in Your Application to Participate in “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI” Bioinformatics Course

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Health science librarians in the U.S. are invited to participate in the next offering of the bioinformatics training course, “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, NLM Training Center (NTC).

The course provides knowledge and skills for librarians interested in helping patrons use online molecular databases and tools from the NCBI. Prior knowledge of molecular biology and genetics is not required. Participating in the Librarian’s Guide course will improve your ability to initiate or extend bioinformatics services at your institution.

Instructors will be NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., MLS, Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

Online Pre-Course and In-Person Course Components
There are two parts to “A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI,” listed below. Applicants must complete both parts. Participants must complete the pre-course with full CE credit (Part 1) in order to advance to attend the 5-day in-person course (Part 2).

Part 1: “Fundamentals in Bioinformatics and Searching,” an online (asynchronous) course,
January 12 – February 13, 2015

The major goal of this part is to provide an introduction to bioinformatics theory and practice in support of developing and implementing library-based bioinformatics products and services. This material is essential for decision-making and implementation of these programs, particularly instructional and reference services. The course encompasses visualizing bioinformatics end-user practice. It places a strong emphasis on hands-on acquisition of NCBI search competencies, and developing a working molecular biology vocabulary through self-paced hands-on exercises.

Part 2: A 5-day in-person course offered on-site at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland, March 9 – 13, 2015.

The in-person course will focus on using the BLAST sequence similarity search and Entrez text search systems to find relevant molecular data. The course will describe the various kinds of molecular data available and explain how these are generated and used in modern biomedical research. The course will be a combination of instruction, demonstration, discussions, and hands-one exercises (both individual and group).

Who can apply?

Applications are open to health science librarians in the United States.

Applicants will be accepted both from libraries currently providing bioinformatics services as well as from those desiring to implement services.

Enrollment is limited 25 participants.

What does it cost?

There is no charge for the classes. Travel and lodging costs for the in-person class are at the expense of the participant.

à à à IMPORTANT NOTE: Interested applicants may want to consider a MAR professional development award to support travel for the in-person training.

Important Application Dates

Application deadline: November 17, 2014

Acceptance notification: On or about December 15, 2014

How to Apply

Please fill out the Application Form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/guide_2015_app.

Once you complete the Application Form, you will be directed to download the Supervisor Support Statement (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/Supervisor_Supportv2.pdf). This is to be filled out and signed by your immediate supervisor. This statement describes your current and/or future role in bioinformatics support at your institution and confirms your availability to attend the course if selected.

Provide your current curriculum vitae (CV). Please use the suggested CV model as a guideline for the type of information desired (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/education/librarian_guide/Forms/LibGuide_CV_model.pdf).

Course Page
The course page with additional information is at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/education/librarian/

Questions?
Please direct any questions to: ncbi_course@lists.utah.edu

By Janet Zipser
MEDLARS Management Section

NLM’s DailyMed Website Redesigned with New Features and Improved Usability

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The National Library of Medicine launched a newly redesigned DailyMed web site. DailyMed provides trustworthy information about marketed drugs in the U.S., and is the official provider of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label information. The website provides a standard, comprehensive, up-to-date, look-up and download resource of medication content and labeling found in medication package inserts. Since 2005, when DailyMed was first launched, its usage has increased significantly.

Based on the needs and feedback received from the public, NLM began redesigning the DailyMed web site in 2013. The new site is a responsive design which is now easily accessible on all types of devices, adjusting and optimizing automatically for smart phones to large screen desktop displays. Based on the size of the screen, content will relocate, images will resize, the layout will change, and even the navigation will adjust, to deliver an exceptional user experience no matter what device is being used to view the site.

In addition to responsive design, the following new features are available:

  • Enhanced Search Results to include displaying of NDC Codes, Pill Images, and Package Label Images on the search result page. The information will help users easily identify the drug label. The thumbnail images of drugs, magnification feature, accordions, etc. provide a more user friendly experience.
  • Improved user interface by displaying an accordion-style data presentation, so users don’t have to scroll through the entire label.
  • Simplified page navigation and added definitions & tooltips for industry-specific phrases.
  • A dedicated News page and Article & Presentation Page for users to easily access DailyMed and NLM/FDA drug-related news.

Celebrate Health Literacy Month – Support our Thunderclap Campaign!

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion is celebrating Health Literacy Month by kicking off a Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to understand health information. In order for our mass message to go out, we need to reach 250 supporters by October 15 – and we need your help! Please help us spread the word.

In addition, @healthfinder will tweet weekly conversation starters this month. Feel free to join in our discussions using the hashtag #HealthLit. We look forward to hearing not just what you’re doing this month, but how you’re working to improve health literacy year round!

Sample Tweets

October is Health Literacy Month! Support this HHS Thunderclap in support of clear health info for all. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

Do you agree that everyone should have access to clear health info? Support this Thunderclap: http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

9 in 10 Americans have trouble understanding health info. Join the Thunderclap in support of #HealthLit. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

Sample Facebook Post

It’s Health Literacy Month! We encourage you to support the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to-understand health information for all Americans. Join by Oct. 15th. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

Kick Off Health Literacy Month

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Take the #plainpledge

October is Health Literacy Month. Join the UAMS Center for Health Literacy in making health information simple.

October 1st – 22nd

How to take the pledge:

  • Take a simple selfie with a health-related word that you pledge to stop using or better explain.
  • Post your simple selfie on your Facebook or Twitter @UAMS_CHL using the hashtag #plainpledge
  • Tag your friends and co-workers to challenge them to take the pledge

Participants will be entered in a drawing for a chance to win prizes!

https://www.facebooks.com/uamscenterfor healthliteracy/

National Library of Medicine Joins the Commons on Flickr!

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The National Library of Medicine has announced that it is now a participating institution of the Commons on Flickr. The Commons on Flickr was launched in 2008 as a pilot project in partnership with the Library of Congress in order to increase access to publicly-held photography collections and to invite the general public to provide information about the collections. The National Library of Medicine now joins a distinguished, international group of nearly one hundred cultural institutions in providing greater access to its collection and inviting public use of and engagement with these images held in the public trust through The Commons on Flickr.

Images from the historical collections of the History of Medicine Division, including public health posters, book illustrations, photographs, fine art work, and ephemera, have always been available through the Images from the History of Medicine database, which includes over 70,000 images illustrating the social and historical aspects of medicine dated from the 15th to the 21st century. Now, they can also be accessed through the Commons on Flickr via a photostream, where visitors can contribute information about the images by adding comments and tags. By adding a new way to see its collections through Flickr NLM hopes to learn more details about its collections, create dialog about its holdings, and share knowledge with the public. The collection of images on Flickr will continue to grow so visitors can check back regularly for new content!

NCBI HIV-1 Website Updated

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The HIV-1, human interaction database has been updated and is now on an improved page. The improved interface includes help documentation and supports structured queries against Gene, as well as browsing, filtering and downloading the protein and replication interaction data sets. The most recent data release (June 2014) includes 12,785 HIV-1, human protein-protein interactions for 3,142 human genes and 1,316 replication interactions for 1,250 human genes. The HIV-1, human interactions project, collates published reports of two types of interactions – HIV-1, human protein interactions, and human gene knock-downs that affect virus replication which are reported as “replication interactions.”

Important Spiritual Care Symposium on Helping Survivors of Bullying

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

http://tinyurl.com/ove6lga