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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Update on Ebola / CDC Webinar / NLM Resources

Friday, September 26th, 2014

***As the West Africa Ebola outbreak continues, here’s a reminder of NLM resources that may be of value.***

All of these resources, and others, are listed on the guide “Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources” at http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/ebola_2014.html. The guide is frequently updated and now has a section on “Situation Reports” and has added links to “Free Resources from Publishers.”

Disaster Lit continues to add guidelines from CDC, World Health Organization and others; reports; government documents; factsheets and more.

http://disasterlit.nlm.nih.gov/search/?searchTerms=ebola+OR+hemorrhagic&search.x=45&search.y=11&search=Search

The NLM Emergency Access Initiative, http://eai.nlm.nih.gov/, is available through October 17 for free access to 650 journals, 4,000 reference books and databases. Virology, epidemiology, and infectious disease textbooks have been the most popular.

*NEW* The “Virus Variation: Ebolavirus Resource” for genome and protein sequences is now available from the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/variation/ebola/

Ebola topic pages for the general public are available from MedlinePlus in English (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ebola.html) and in Spanish (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spanish/ebola.html).

NATIONAL CALL: ASPR/CDC Invites YouWebinar on Ebola Preparedness: Detailed Hospital Checklist / Monday, Sept. 29, 3-4 pm ET

You can access this webinar via the following call-in and URL information: Dial in numbers: 888-325-0345. Restrictions may exist when accessing toll free numbers using a mobile telephone.

For Participants:

URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join/

Conference number: PW8836414

Audience passcode: 9909990

Participants can join the event directly at: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW8836414&p=9909990&t=c

Please note that this webinar will support the first 1,000 attendees, but the webinar will be recorded and available at www.phe.gov < http://www.phe.gov/preparedness/Pages/default.aspx >  for future reference.

***Is the Ebola outbreak a topic of interest in your communities or institutions? We’d like to get an anecdotal idea of the nature of requests (if any) you may be getting for Ebola-related information. Please send your observations to cindy_love@nlm.nih.gov, not the list, and I will summarize for sharing.***

Group Licensing Initiative’s Fall Offer

Friday, September 26th, 2014

PARTICIPATION IN FALL 2014 GROUP LICENSING OFFER IS OPEN

TO ALL MAR AND SE/A LIBRARIES

PRINCETON, NJ (SEPTEMBER 23, 2014)—All medical librarians in the MAR and SE/A Regions are invited to participate in the Group Licensing Initiative (GLI), formed under the umbrella organization Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ), through their Fall 2014 Offer. Nearly 500 resources from 11 vendors are available through the Offer, and at a cost savings of 15-70% off regular pricing, through the leveraging of group purchasing power.

Group Licensing is a creative solution to the escalating cost of high-quality electronic resources—medical journals, books and databases. More than 100 hospitals and medical facilities regularly participate in the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative, known as the first consortium of its kind in the nation.

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR), and Southeastern/Atlantic Region (SE/A) fully recognize and endorse the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative as the lead organization capable of assisting libraries in their efforts to utilize multi-dimensional electronic resources. Managed by medical librarian and HSLANJ Executive Director Robert Mackes, MLS, AHIP, the GLI is guided by a committee comprised of librarians from different-sized health facilities in the regions served.

To receive a copy of the Fall Offer, please contact Robert Mackes at 570-856-5952 or rtmackes@gmail.com. The deadline to participate in the Fall Offer is Friday, October 31. New this fall: See the HSLANJ website, under “News” for articles previewing vendors’ new resources available through the Offer (http://hslanj.org/news).

For additional information on the HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative, come meet with the GLI’s Robert Mackes in October at any of the following chapter meetings:

October 19-21: MAC, Alexandria, VA

October 22-23: UNYOC, Saratoga Springs, NY

October 24: NYNJ Chapter, NY, NY

October 27-29: Southern Chapter, Mobile, AL

Feel free to contact Robert about scheduling a meeting or presentation about the GLI, at your next chapter, state organization or local consortium meeting, as well.

The HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative is funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00003-C with the University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Library System. This project is also funded in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland Baltimore.

NLM Resource Update: Haz-Map Adds 497 New Agents

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated Haz-Map with 497 new agents. It now covers 10,133 biological and chemical agents.

Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the health effects of exposure to chemicals and biologicals at work. Haz-Map links jobs and hazardous tasks with occupational diseases and their symptoms.

More information can be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/hazmap.html.

NLM Announces New VSAC Tutorial

Friday, September 26th, 2014

NLM has announced a new Value Set Authority Center (VSAC) tutorial, Updating Value Sets. The nine-minute tutorial is available as a link from the UMLS Video Learning Resources page, the NLM Distance Education Resources page, and is posted at the NLM YouTube site. Additional tutorials designed to assist users with VSAC and VSAC authoring tools are in development. NLM encourages comments about the tutorial and suggestions for further topics, which may be sent to NLM Customer Service.

The NLM Value Set Authority Center is developed by NLM in collaboration with Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to provide searchable access to value sets that are used to define concepts used in clinical quality measures, and to support effective health information exchange and many other biomedical informatics applications and programs. Since October 2013, VSAC also offers the Authoring Tool that allows users to author value sets.

Changes to the NLM License Agreement for NLM Data

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is announcing the release of its revised “License Agreement for NLM Data.” This revised license, dated September 1, 2014, will supersede the license last revised on October 24, 2008. Existing licensees wishing to continue access to 2015 data will be asked to accept the new license when they renew their license in November 2014. (The 2015 renewal system will be available for existing licensees from approximately November 5 – December 10, 2014.) Beginning September 1, 2014 prospective licensees will accept the new license.

The revised license is available at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/databases/license/license.pdf. The following summarizes the changes:

  • For many years, NLM offered a subset of the archival International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) data via the TOXLINE Subset. However, no one is leasing the IPA subset data from us and therefore we will no longer offer it as part of our data distribution program. Parties interested in the archival IPA subset data should contact Thomson Reuters™.
    1. Section 8. PREREQUISITE ARRANGEMENT and Appendix B (Prerequisite Arrangement with Producer of Data) have been deleted from the license
    2. Sections 9 through 16 have been re-numbered accordingly (i.e., Sections 8 through 15, respectively)
    3. Appendices C and D have been re-lettered accordingly (i.e., Appendix B and Appendix C, respectively)
    4. The list of appendices in the license (Section 15. APPENDICES) has been updated
    5. References to Appendices B and C have been updated
    6. The license and appendices page numbering have been updated
  • Since October 2013, NLM no longer adds, updates or maintains records in DIRLINE (DIRLINE Ends Its 30 Year Run). Therefore, NLM will no longer lease DIRLINE data.
    1. References to DIRLINE have been deleted from Appendices A and the (re-lettered) B.

General information about leasing databases from the National Library of Medicine may be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/databases/leased.html and you may contact us at nlmdatadistrib@nlm.nih.gov if you have questions or need additional information.

Margaret A. McGhee
MEDLARS Management Section

NLM Resource Update: How Can NLM TOXMAP Be Used by Native Americans and Other Populations?

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Although TOXMAP is not specifically designed for any one particular group, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program and Superfund Programs can be of interest to specific populations such as Native Americans by helping to find sources of chemical releases and contamination in locations of interest to them.

In the beta version of TOXMAP, click on the “Zoom to Location” icon, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “Address or Place” search box, then click “Zoom to.”

In TOXMAP classic click on “Zoom to a Place”, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “other place name” search box, then click “Submit”. You can also overlay US Census data by race: “American Indian and Alaskan Native” (1990) or “One Race: American Indian and Alaska Native” and “Two or More Races Including American Indian and Alaska Native” (2000).

For more information, see the TOXMAP and Native American Populations page.

My NCBI – ORCID Author Data Integration with SciENcv

Friday, September 26th, 2014

SciENcv users will soon be able to create SciENcv profiles using the data stored in their ORCID records. By linking an ORCID account to an NCBI account, users will be able to create SciENcv profiles using the personal statement, education, employment, publications and research awards information stored in ORCID records.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/so14/so14_sciencv_orcid.html

NLM Resource Update: Environmental Health Student Portal

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine Environmental Health Student Portal has added Mercury and Your Health, an animation about the uses of mercury and how exposure can impact human health. The 16-minute video introduces children to mercury and its basic properties, discusses mercury exposure routes, outlines health impacts of mercury, describes mercury containing products, discusses mercury contamination in the environment, outlines the proper disposal of mercury containing products, discusses bioaccumulation and mercury contamination of fish, and describes additional sources that children could use to find credible health information on mercury.

The Environmental Health Student Portal connects middle school students and science teachers with free, reliable, and engaging environmental health education resources. The Student Portal offers a diverse array of engaging educational materials such as videos, games and activities, lesson plans, experiments and projects, fun challenges, as well as additional resources for further reading. Mercury is one of the chemicals covered in this resource.

NCBI RefSeq Release 67 Available on FTP

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The full RefSeq release 67 is now available on the NCBI FTP site with over 61 million records describing 45,166,402 proteins; 8,163,775 RNAs; and sequences from 41,913 different NCBI TaxIDs. More details about the RefSeq release 67 are included in the release statistics and release notes. In addition, reports indicating the accessions included in the release and the files installed are available.

To subscribe to the ncbi-announce mailing list, visit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mailman/listinfo/ncbi-announce.

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

Friday, September 26th, 2014

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversations project, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.