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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Evaluation “Soundbites” from the CDC

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Want to build your repertoire of evaluation skills?  Check out Soundbites, a library of evaluation-related podcasts and webinars from the CDC’s Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention.  These are archived documents from 20-minute “coffee break” presentations about evaluation. The usual basic topics are represented, such as “Making Logic Models Work for You”  and “How Do I Develop a Survey?” But a number of the presentations cover topics that are not standard fare. Here are just a few titles that caught my eye:

Facilitation Skills for Evaluators – Getting the Most Out of Partnership Engagement

Using Qualitative Data to Share Programmatic Success 

Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Evaluation

Establishing a Baseline as Part of Your Evaluation

Communicating about Data

Most presentations consist of PDFs of PowerPoint slides and talking points, but there are a few podcasts as well.  All presentations seem to be bird’s-eye overviews, but the final slides offer transcripts of Q&A discussion and a list of resources for more in-depth exploration of the topic.  It’s a great way to check out a new evaluation interest!

Mobile Data Solutions Course

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Are you curious about the use of smart phones, tablets, or other mobile data resources to collect data for your assessment project, but are seeking more information on how to determine if this is the right approach for your project or program and how to process the data you collect using this method?

Check out http://techchange.org/media/mobile-data-solutions/, which was created as part of the Mobile Solutions Technical Assistance and Research (mSTAR) project, with expertise provided by U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Digital Development Lab and designed by TechChange.

The primary goal of this freely available and accessible online course (free registration is required to access it) is to learn more about mobile tools, processes, and strategies for data collection in order to use mobile devices (referred to as mobile data solutions) to their full potential in doing so. The course will take about 2 hours to complete and can be done at your own pace over time. Your progress in the course is saved so you’ll be taken to the point where you stopped to continue learning the next time you access it.

The learning objectives of the course are

  • Describe examples of mobile data solutions from collection through visualization
  • Articulate the benefit of using these solutions
  • Analyze the challenges and limitations associated with mobile data solutions
  • Assess whether or not particular mobile data solutions are appropriate for a project, program or problem
  • Outline how to design a project or activity to include mobile data solutions
  • Explain the steps involved in implementing mobile data solutions
  • Summarize how to analyze, visualize, and share mobile data

Ring in 2015 with 8 MLA CEs, a Project Plan, and MAR Funding to Make it Happen!

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

MAR invites applications for our next round of funding opportunities which are due March 13, 2015.  Funding is designed to support our network members, as well as to encourage outreach activities aligned with the NN/LM mission to provide all U.S. health professionals with equal access to biomedical information, and improve the public’s access to information so they can make informed decisions about their health.

Libraries, information centers, health centers, community- and faith-based organizations, and others providing health information services are encouraged to apply for a variety of awards that:

  • improve health information services
  • increase awareness and access to biomedical information
  • educate and empower consumers to make informed decisions about their health
  • prepare librarians and staff to meet the needs and challenges of the changing healthcare environment

To coincide with this new round of funding, MAR has teamed up with Outreach and Evaluation expert, Cindy Olney, from the NN/LM Outreach and Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) to offer a 4-part webinar series, eligible for up to 8 MLA CEs.

Mapping an Outreach Project:  Start with Information; End with a Plan is designed for anyone who wants to garner support, financial or otherwise, for a new project or service.  You will learn how assessment and evaluation can be effective tools for project planning and proposal writing.  Assessment enables you to gather compelling information about the need and viability of your project.  It also helps you build relationships with potential partners.  Adding evaluation methods to your program plan helps you “begin with the end in mind,” making desired results the centerpiece of your project proposal.  This class will elaborate on information contained in the OERC Planning and Evaluation booklets.

  • Webinar 1:  January 12:  Noon-1:00 pm

Know the factors that influence people to adopt new ideas and technology so you can choose the best strategies for your project

  • Webinar 2:  January 14:  Noon-1:00 pm

Gather information about your target audience that is most effective for planning your project

  • Webinar 3:  January 26:  Noon-1:00 pm

Use a project-planning tool that allows you to logically link resources and activities to desired results

  • Webinar 4:  January 28:  Noon-1:00 pm

Incorporate evaluation into your project and understand how your plan can be expanded into a full project proposal

These classes will be followed by a special 2-hour Grants and Proposal Writing course, offered online February 2nd / 10 am – Noon.

These classes will focus special attention on applications for MAR funding.  However, information presented is relevant to many types of outreach and project proposals.

The Perils & Promises of Genomic Medicine (Boost Box session)

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Presenter:           Carrie Iwema, Information Specialist in Molecular Biology, Molecular Biology Information Service / Health Sciences Library System, University of Pittsburgh

Date / Time:       Tuesday, January 13, 2015 / Noon – 1 pm (ET)

Where:                https://webmeeting.nih.gov/boost2/

Online / No Registration Required / 1 MLA CE will be awarded

Description: Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have greatly reduced the cost of whole genome sequencing and created fascinating new areas of study—personal genomics and personalized medicine. Empowered by recent technological advancements, scientists now have the ability to rapidly compare genetic alphabets of groups of people who show a particular trait with those that do not.  Access to your personal genome enables you to identify genetic risk factors or inheritable disease markers you are carrying and can help you and your doctor choose the appropriate medications, dosages, and healthcare strategies.  It is more critical than ever to have a basic understanding of the science behind these advances, as well as the associated ethical, legal, and social issues, in order to actively participate in this exciting and rapidly changing field.

2015 MeSH Now Available in PubMed

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

As of December 15, PubMed/MEDLINE citations (including the backlog of citations indexed since November 19 with 2015 MeSH), the MeSH database, and the NLM Catalog were updated to reflect 2015 MeSH. The MeSH translation tables were also updated on December 15. Now that end-of-year activities are complete, PubMed/MEDLINE may be searched using 2015 MeSH vocabulary. On December 16, NLM resumed daily MEDLINE updates to PubMed.

NLM Resource Update: TOXNET Now Provides Permalinks to Individual Records

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

TOXNET is a group of databases covering chemicals and drugs, diseases and the environment, environmental health, occupational safety and health, poisoning, risk assessment and regulations, and toxicology http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/. TOXNET includes the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) which provides toxicity data for over 5,700 potentially hazardous chemicals. HSDB also has information on emergency handling procedures, industrial hygiene, environmental fate, human exposure, detection methods, and regulatory requirements. HSDB is one of the features of WISER, the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders http://wiser.nlm.nih.gov/.

Permanent links to National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXNET records are now provided for HSDB as well as TOXLINE, LactMed, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART), Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER), Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS), and GENE-TOX.

To create a permanent link, click on the “Permalink” button found in the upper right of a TOXNET record. This provides a pop-up window with a URL to share or to save for retrieving the record at a later time.

DOCLINE Training Coming in January

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Save the date: Online DOCLINE Training Series for new DOCLINE users and those who want a refresher.

No registration is required. Class login- information to follow.

Beginning DOCLINE: January 7, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class covers the bare essentials of DOCLINE where participants will have an increased understanding of the basic features of DOCLINE. The instructor will give an overview of the layout of the DOCLINE window and will provide a brief description of some of the most commonly used features and their functions.

DOCLINE Routing Tables: January 14, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE Routing Tables. Participants will learn about using their Borrowing Preferences, brief explanation of copyright compliance, editing Routing Tables, M/A/N Map, setting up Lending Options, and more!

DOCLINE: Serial Holdings: January 21, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE’s Serial Holdings. Participants will be provided with an introduction to the Serial Holdings database, how to add, remove, and update Holdings, how to run reports, and where to go to get additional Serial Holdings support.

New to this class using the embargo feature.

DOCLINE Borrowing and Lending: January 28, 2015 / 1 PM (ET)

This class will provide an in-depth look into DOCLINE Borrowing and Lending. Participants will learn about: using their Borrowing Preferences; the many ways to borrow; how to process request received; how to run and view reports; the different levels of requests (normal, rush, and urgent patient care) and more.

NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) System Getting a New Look

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

In January, 2015, the NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system will be getting a new interface design, which will streamline the login and manuscript submission processes and provide relevant help information on each screen. The NIHMS sign-in routes will be available from the homepage, with options based on a funding agency or signing in through NCBI. The new homepage will also include a graphic overview of the NIHMS process, allowing you to hover over each step for more information or to click on “Learn More” to read the complete overview in the FAQ. Once you are signed in to NIHMS, you will be directed to your Manuscript List. From this page you can manage and track your existing submissions, submit a new manuscript, and search for a record. You can also click on any headings in the information box to expand a topic and read the help text. The initial deposit will still require you to enter a manuscript and journal title, deposit complete manuscript files, and specify funding information and the embargo.

Key updates will include:

  • Assigning an NIHMSID to a record only after files have been uploaded, i.e., at the Check Files step;
  • A streamlined deposit process with clearly defined and explained actions in each step;
  • Requiring the Submitter to open the PDF Receipt to review the uploaded files and confirm that the submission is complete before advancing to the next step;
  • Relevant help information on each page; and
  • Requiring the Reviewer to add funding before approving the initial deposit.

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

In September, the OERC blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.

Ebola in Context: New Free Online Course

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

January 19, 2015

Two weeks / 6 hours per week

This two-week asynchronous free interdisciplinary course looks at the science behind the Ebola outbreak to understand why it has occurred on this scale and how it can be controlled. This course is designed for healthcare professionals or anyone working in a health organization; undergraduate students taking a healthcare or science-related degree; medical students and postgraduates wishing to complement their studies; and anyone else with a keen interest in the science behind Ebola.

http://blogs.lshtm.ac.uk/alumni/2014/12/09/ebola-context-new-free-online-course-launched/

Register: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/ebola-in-context