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Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

PubMed Journal Searching Trifold Brochure

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

A new brochure has joined the PubMed listings! Share this brochure with your patrons.

PubMed Journal Searching:http://nnlm.gov/training/resources/journalstri.pdf

Explore the three different ways to add journals to any PubMed search.  These are: adding individual journals,  applying a filter, and using a journal search created in the NLM Catalog.

This brochure, as are all of our NN/LM trifold brochures, is available in three formats: PDF, doc, and docx. To access a different format, simply alter the URL.

FYI: The list of the NN/LM PubMed resources now includes:

For a comprehensive list of printable handouts, visit the MAR Educational and Printed Materials page: http://nnlm.gov/mar/training/materials.html

A Call to Action for a Nationwide Interoperable Health IT Infrastructure

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has announced the release of Connecting Health and Care for the Nation: A 10-Year Vision to Achieve an Interoperable Health IT Infrastructure.

“This paper describes ONC’s broad vision and framework for interoperability and is an invitation to health IT stakeholders – clinicians, consumers, hospitals, public health, technology developers, payers, researchers, policymakers and many others – to join ONC in developing a defined, shared roadmap that will allow us to collectively achieve health IT interoperability as a core foundational element of better care, at a lower cost and better health for all.” The ONC welcomes your feedback on this paper and will offer several opportunities over the coming months to provide your feedback. Stay tuned for future details.

NIH launches 3D Print Exchange

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that enables users to share, download, and edit 3D print files related to health and science. These files can be used, for example, to print custom laboratory equipment and models of bacteria and human anatomy. The NIH 3D Print Exchange also provides video tutorials and additional resources with instruction on 3D modeling software to enable users to customize and create 3D prints.

“3D printing is a potential game changer for medical research,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “At NIH, we have seen an incredible return on investment; pennies’ worth of plastic have helped investigators address important scientific questions while saving time and money. We hope that the 3D Print Exchange will expand interest and participation in this new and exciting field among scientists, educators and students.”

NIH uses 3D printing, or the creation of a physical object from a digital model, to study viruses, repair and enhance lab apparatus, and help plan medical procedures. The 3D Print Exchange makes these types of files freely available, along with video tutorials for new users and a discussion forum to promote collaboration. The site also features tools that convert scientific and clinical data into ready-to-print 3D files.

The 3D Print Exchange is a collaborative effort led by NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). “3D printing is helping to advance science at NIAID and beyond,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “The ability to design and print tangible models of pathogens, for example, can give researchers a fresh perspective on the diseases they study and open new and promising lines of investigation.”

Additional support is provided by other NIH components, including the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Library of Medicine. The 3D Print Exchange is funded in part by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through its Ignite External Web Site Policy and Ventures External Web Site Policy programs, which help support innovation within the agency.

From Hurricanes to Pandemics: Helping Practices Prepare for the Worst

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will be hosting a Webinar on Friday, July 18, 2014, see information below:

From Hurricanes to Pandemics: Helping Practices Prepare for the Worst

Date: Friday, July 18, 2014

Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CDT

Description: This one hour Webinar is geared toward the primary care provider who works in an office setting. The Webinar will offer general preparedness strategies and ideas for how pediatricians and their office staff can prepare for disasters. Tips will be shared on how pediatricians can work to improve preparedness in families with children with special health care needs, as they are more vulnerable in disasters. The Webinar will also assist pediatricians to take concrete steps to strengthen office practices related to newborn screening and contingency planning. To register, visit https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/232227134, or e-mail DisasterReady@aap.org with your name and e-mail address.

Speakers:

  1. Scott Needle, MD, FAAP
  2. Georgina Peacock, MD, MPH, FAAP
  3. Timothy Geleske, MD, FAAP

Please consider sharing this information on any available electronic mailing lists or with individual offices. We very much appreciate your help in promoting this Webinar!

If you have any questions, please e-mail DisasterReady@aap.org.

Sean Diederich, Program Coordinator, Disaster Preparedness and Response

American Academy of Pediatrics

Department of Child Health and Wellness

141 Northwest Point Blvd.

Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

Ph: 847-434-7125 Fax: 847-434-8000

Email: sdiederich@aap.org

NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program 2014-2015: Call for Applications

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) has announced the 2014-2015 opportunity for the leadership program jointly sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and AAHSL, with an application deadline of August 1, 2014. The NLM/AAHSL Leadership Fellows Program is focused on preparing emerging leaders for the position of library director in academic health sciences libraries. Fellows will have the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in a variety of learning settings, including exposure to leadership in another environment. They will be paired with mentors who are academic health sciences library directors. In addition to the individual relationship with their mentors, fellows benefit from working collaboratively with other fellows and mentors. Experienced program faculty and mentors will provide content and facilitation for the cohort. The program takes advantage of flexible scheduling and an online learning community to minimize disruption to professional and personal schedules. The sponsors will provide financial support for a small cohort of fellows and will underwrite travel and meeting expenses. Sixty-one fellows have participated in the program since its inauguration in 2002. To date, twenty-six fellows have been appointed to director positions.

The one-year program design is multi-faceted, involving three in-person leadership institutes; attendance at an Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) annual meeting; a yearlong fellow/mentor relationship; webinars and discussions on issues related to library leadership; and two weeks of site visit to the mentor’s home library. Candidates for fellow should have a strong interest in pursuing a directorship in academic health sciences libraries, as well as significant management experience. Applications are welcomed from professionals working in academic health sciences libraries, hospital libraries, or other library-related settings. Details about the program design, schedule, and application process are available in the program brochure.

Introducing Free Access to Library-Specific Courses through WebJunction

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

Beginning on July 1, access to WebJunction’s library-specific courses is available for free to all library workers (including volunteers) across the nation. Through the generous support of OCLC, the Gates Foundation, and many state library agencies across the U.S., WebJunction will continue to provide timely and relevant learning content for you to access anytime, from anywhere. Simply create an account at learn.webjunction.org, and then explore the catalog of library-focused self-paced courses and webinars. Certificates of completion will be available to you after you have completed any course or webinar that you enroll in from the catalog.

Over the next year, WebJunction will continue to grow its catalog of learning content, and will add new resources on topics of high interest on www.webjunction.org. Please be sure you are subscribed to Crossroads, our monthly e-newsletter that will let you know about new learning programs and professional development opportunities.

Happy learning!
-The WebJunction Team

Telling Training’s Story: The Success Case Method

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

National Network of Libraries of Medicine

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

Telling Training’s Story: The Success Case Method

“On the average, it is true that most training does not work very well. But some programs work very well with some of the people, and this represents their great potential for being leveraged for even greater results.” Robert O. Brinkerhoff, “Telling Training’s Story.”

Most evaluation methods for program training reduce data to averages: the average number of things learned by participants; the average number of techniques applied on the job; the average number of times a skill was used post-training. Unfortunately, this approach can underestimate the true value of training for the organizations investing in the programs.

In Telling Training’s Story, Brinkerhoff writes that, in reality, the majority of participants gain little from training programs.  They either use some information but get no results, or they simply give up after a few attempts. Sometimes poor instructional design is to blame. More often, low success is caused by contextual variables, such as lack of supervisory support, no opportunity to try out the learning, or program timing. In fact, good instructional design often cannot compensate for these environmental crosscurrents.

Yet, Brinkerhoff argues that most training programs can boast a few success cases. There are usually a handful of participants (sometimes more) who apply their new knowledge or skill to produce valuable results for their organizations.  Sometimes the value of their contributions justifies program cost. Or, if the percentage of success cases was boosted by just 10%, the investment would be worthwhile to the organization.

To truly evaluate a training program, you need to identify any positive outcomes that occur, even if they are traced to a small number of participants, and assess the value of those results. You also need to determine what instructional and contextual factors influence successful use of training information. Then, organizations can make informed decisions about continuing to invest in training.

Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method (SCM) was designed for in-depth analysis of training programs and their outcomes. The method focuses on high and low success cases. High success cases refer to incidents where participants applied training program information and attained positive results for their organizations. Low success cases are situations in which participants demonstrated no application of the training information.

Investigation of the high-success cases identifies the best possible outcomes that occur when employees apply information gained from the training program. By adding low-success cases into the mix, the method also leads to a thorough understanding of key factors, both in training design and in the organizational context, that influence participants use of their new capabilities.

Brinkerhoff’s book Telling Training’s Story provides step-by-step guidance for conducting SCM studies. Steps include working with stakeholders to define success and value; developing a program impact model, using rigorous sampling methods; and testing rival hypotheses for your findings. By following these steps, you can present a case study with compelling evidence of your program’s value. If you find your program is ineffective, the process will illustrate the factors working against its success.

So, the next time you want to evaluate a training program, consider going beyond “average.”  Check out the Success Case Method.

Source: Brinkerhoff RO. Telling training’s story. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers; 2006.

EFTS Tip of the Week

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

One of the goals of EFTS is to minimize the labor-intensive process of creating invoices/bills and cutting checks for both borrowing and lending institutions. It is recommended that regular, timely deposits be made to the system by check, credit card or wire transfer. For your convenience a blank invoice may be downloaded from the EFTS web site at: https://efts.uchc.edu/EftsPublic/forms.aspx

*Checks:

ALL checks must be made payable to: University of Connecticut Health Center DBA EFTS/Library
The institution’s LIBID must be clearly visible on the check to ensure that it is posted to the proper account.

*Credit cards:

VISA and/or MasterCard can be used to deposit funds to an EFTS account. Download and fill out the Credit Card Transaction Form, available under the Forms link https://efts.uchc.edu/Public/Forms.aspx and send to our secure fax at (860) 679-1305 OR attach the completed form then e-mail to: efts@uchc.edu
Once your form is on file, click the “Credit Card Deposit Request” link while logged in to submit your electronic request for a transaction to be executed on behalf of your library.  The actual Credit Card deposits are processed at 3pm Eastern Time, Monday through Friday.

*Wire transfers:
Contact our office for details.

Jola Sliwinski, EFTS Program Coordinator
(866) 561-5045 toll free
(860) 679-4561 direct
(860) 679-1305 fax
sliwinski@uchc.edu
https://efts.uchc.edu

Disaster Planning: 10-Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Presenter:           Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Details:                http://nnlm.gov/training/schedule/class_details.html?class_id=489

Date / Time:       Wednesday, July 9 and Thursday, July 10, 2014 / 10 – 11:30 am (ET)

Where:                Online

Summary:           Learn how high the risk level may be for your library. The goals of the class are to raise awareness of the need for emergency preparedness, response planning, and to provide tools for enhancing preparedness for librarians. You will learn how to conduct a basic risk assessment for your library, how to craft a basic emergency preparedness plan, strategies for continuing library services from off-site, and options for obtaining assistance, both web-based resources and through the NN/LM Emergency Preparedness & Response structure. This class will be divided into two one-and-a-half hour sessions. Participants who complete course requirements will earn 5 MLA CE credits.

Navigating Health Information for Academic Libraries

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Presenter:           Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Details:                http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=707

Date / Time:       July 14, 2014 / 10 am – Noon (ET)

Where:                Online

Summary:           This class is for academic librarians to improve their awareness and learn more about how their faculty/students can research the health, chemical, and environmental literature; find consumer health information; and learn about mobile apps to find what they need.

Includes introductions to PubMed, MedlinePlus, PubChem, TOXNET, Genetics Home Reference, Drug Information Portal, ClinicalTrials.gov, as well as other free databases/services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM).