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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

Celebrate Health Literacy Month – Support our Thunderclap Campaign!

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion is celebrating Health Literacy Month by kicking off a Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to understand health information. In order for our mass message to go out, we need to reach 250 supporters by October 15 – and we need your help! Please help us spread the word.

In addition, @healthfinder will tweet weekly conversation starters this month. Feel free to join in our discussions using the hashtag #HealthLit. We look forward to hearing not just what you’re doing this month, but how you’re working to improve health literacy year round!

Sample Tweets

October is Health Literacy Month! Support this HHS Thunderclap in support of clear health info for all. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

Do you agree that everyone should have access to clear health info? Support this Thunderclap: http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt #HealthLit

9 in 10 Americans have trouble understanding health info. Join the Thunderclap in support of #HealthLit. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

Sample Facebook Post

It’s Health Literacy Month! We encourage you to support the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Thunderclap campaign in support of clear, easy-to-understand health information for all Americans. Join by Oct. 15th. http://thndr.it/1rqdAwt

Kick Off Health Literacy Month

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Take the #plainpledge

October is Health Literacy Month. Join the UAMS Center for Health Literacy in making health information simple.

October 1st – 22nd

How to take the pledge:

  • Take a simple selfie with a health-related word that you pledge to stop using or better explain.
  • Post your simple selfie on your Facebook or Twitter @UAMS_CHL using the hashtag #plainpledge
  • Tag your friends and co-workers to challenge them to take the pledge

Participants will be entered in a drawing for a chance to win prizes!

https://www.facebooks.com/uamscenterfor healthliteracy/

Important Spiritual Care Symposium on Helping Survivors of Bullying

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

http://tinyurl.com/ove6lga

Tornadoes, Chemical Spills, Flooding, Are You Prepared? 10-Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Presenter:       Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Dates:               Wednesday, October 8 and Thursday, October 9, 2014 / 10-11:30 am (ET)

Where:             Online

Details:             http://nnlm.gov/ntcc/classes/class_details.html?class_id=489

Summary:  The goals of the class are to raise awareness of the need for emergency preparedness, response planning, and to provide tools for enhancing preparedness for librarians. Participants will learn how to conduct a basic risk assessment for their libraries, how to craft a basic emergency preparedness plan, strategies for continuing library services from off-site, and options for obtaining assistance, both web-based resources and through the NN/LM Emergency Preparedness & Response structure.

Participants who attend the webinar and complete a short practice exercise will receive 5 MLA CEs.

Update on Ebola / CDC Webinar / NLM Resources

Friday, September 26th, 2014

***As the West Africa Ebola outbreak continues, here’s a reminder of NLM resources that may be of value.***

All of these resources, and others, are listed on the guide “Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources” at http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/ebola_2014.html. The guide is frequently updated and now has a section on “Situation Reports” and has added links to “Free Resources from Publishers.”

Disaster Lit continues to add guidelines from CDC, World Health Organization and others; reports; government documents; factsheets and more.

http://disasterlit.nlm.nih.gov/search/?searchTerms=ebola+OR+hemorrhagic&search.x=45&search.y=11&search=Search

The NLM Emergency Access Initiative, http://eai.nlm.nih.gov/, is available through October 17 for free access to 650 journals, 4,000 reference books and databases. Virology, epidemiology, and infectious disease textbooks have been the most popular.

*NEW* The “Virus Variation: Ebolavirus Resource” for genome and protein sequences is now available from the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/variation/ebola/

Ebola topic pages for the general public are available from MedlinePlus in English (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ebola.html) and in Spanish (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spanish/ebola.html).

NATIONAL CALL: ASPR/CDC Invites YouWebinar on Ebola Preparedness: Detailed Hospital Checklist / Monday, Sept. 29, 3-4 pm ET

You can access this webinar via the following call-in and URL information: Dial in numbers: 888-325-0345. Restrictions may exist when accessing toll free numbers using a mobile telephone.

For Participants:

URL: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join/

Conference number: PW8836414

Audience passcode: 9909990

Participants can join the event directly at: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW8836414&p=9909990&t=c

Please note that this webinar will support the first 1,000 attendees, but the webinar will be recorded and available at www.phe.gov < http://www.phe.gov/preparedness/Pages/default.aspx >  for future reference.

***Is the Ebola outbreak a topic of interest in your communities or institutions? We’d like to get an anecdotal idea of the nature of requests (if any) you may be getting for Ebola-related information. Please send your observations to cindy_love@nlm.nih.gov, not the list, and I will summarize for sharing.***

NLM Resource Update: Haz-Map Adds 497 New Agents

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has updated Haz-Map with 497 new agents. It now covers 10,133 biological and chemical agents.

Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the health effects of exposure to chemicals and biologicals at work. Haz-Map links jobs and hazardous tasks with occupational diseases and their symptoms.

More information can be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/hazmap.html.

NLM Resource Update: How Can NLM TOXMAP Be Used by Native Americans and Other Populations?

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Although TOXMAP is not specifically designed for any one particular group, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program and Superfund Programs can be of interest to specific populations such as Native Americans by helping to find sources of chemical releases and contamination in locations of interest to them.

In the beta version of TOXMAP, click on the “Zoom to Location” icon, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “Address or Place” search box, then click “Zoom to.”

In TOXMAP classic click on “Zoom to a Place”, enter “reservation” or “rancheria” into the “other place name” search box, then click “Submit”. You can also overlay US Census data by race: “American Indian and Alaskan Native” (1990) or “One Race: American Indian and Alaska Native” and “Two or More Races Including American Indian and Alaska Native” (2000).

For more information, see the TOXMAP and Native American Populations page.

NLM Resource Update: Environmental Health Student Portal

Friday, September 26th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine Environmental Health Student Portal has added Mercury and Your Health, an animation about the uses of mercury and how exposure can impact human health. The 16-minute video introduces children to mercury and its basic properties, discusses mercury exposure routes, outlines health impacts of mercury, describes mercury containing products, discusses mercury contamination in the environment, outlines the proper disposal of mercury containing products, discusses bioaccumulation and mercury contamination of fish, and describes additional sources that children could use to find credible health information on mercury.

The Environmental Health Student Portal connects middle school students and science teachers with free, reliable, and engaging environmental health education resources. The Student Portal offers a diverse array of engaging educational materials such as videos, games and activities, lesson plans, experiments and projects, fun challenges, as well as additional resources for further reading. Mercury is one of the chemicals covered in this resource.

Elegantly Simple Evaluation: Documenting Outcomes of a New England Health Literacy Project

Friday, September 26th, 2014

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center New OERC Blog posting! This is to let you know that a new OERC Blog article has become available. You can find this article online here. For simplicity’s sake, we’ve posted the article below:

For an example of an elegantly simple program evaluation that yielded great results, check out an article by Michelle Eberle and colleagues in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine New England Region, which appeared in the August 2014 edition of MLA News . The article describes the region’s Clear: Conversations project, a collaboration among five organizations in which librarians and health professionals taught health literacy skills to patients. This innovative project, originated by Health Care Missouri, featured role-plays of patients in which they practice good patient communication skills during a visit to a health care provider (played by volunteers from various health professions).

This project shows that a few relatively simple evaluation activities can clearly show the positive outcomes of a project. For example, after their role-play, participants gave high ratings to their satisfaction with the information they received during their “doctor visit.”   When completing the multi-session program, a strong majority said the program improved their comfort with employing effective communication techniques with their own health care providers. More than half of respondents completing the second questionnaire described specific actions they intended to use in future visits to health care providers. Also, the health professional role-players provided their own feedback about how their experiences would affect their own interactions with patients.

The evaluation methods used for the Clear: Conversations project were fairly simple, but well-planned. Eberle and her colleagues developed their evaluation methods in the project planning stage and consulted with the NN/LM OERC on method design. As a result, the team was able to collect information that clearly demonstrated, both to themselves and others, the value of their project.

The OERC would like to highlight more examples of evaluations that are both effective and relatively easy to implement.  If you know of other projects that we can showcase in our Elegantly Simple Evaluation series, please contact Cindy Olney at olneyc@uw.edu.

Check Out the Latest Issue of the MAReport

Sunday, September 21st, 2014