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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

Free Access to Ebola Special Issue

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness journal continues to provide free access to all articles in the Ebola special issue. The journal is still receiving papers, which will be published as soon as possible after review. Intending authors can submit their manuscripts online. A print version will be made available in Spring 2015.

Top 100 Altmetrics papers for 2014

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Here’s the Top 100 Altmetrics List for 2014 – the 100 papers with the highest scores as calculated by Altmetrics.

http://www.altmetric.com/top100/2014/?utm_source=announcement&utm_medium=emails&utm_term=2014top100&utm_campaign=top1002014emails

New AIDSinfo Drug App Released

Friday, December 5th, 2014

AIDSinfo is pleased to announce the release of the AIDSinfo Drug App. Using data from the AIDSinfo Drug Database, the drug app provides information on more than 100 HIV-related approved and investigational drugs. The information, offered in English and Spanish, is tailored to meet the needs of both health care providers and consumers. The app is designed to automatically refresh when the user is connected to a wireless or cellular data network. The auto update feature eliminates the need to manually update the app to view the most current drug information. In addition, the app works offline, ensuring that health care providers and consumers can access vital drug information anywhere—even in health care facilities that may not have an Internet connection.

Health care providers surveyed on the AIDSinfo website indicated that access to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labels for HIV-related drugs would be a useful feature of a drug app. Thus FDA drug labels pulled from DailyMed are integrated into the app in an easy-to-navigate format. This feature, coupled with the auto update feature, makes it easy for health care providers to quickly find the latest drug information when seeing patients. In addition, information from the FDA labels is condensed in easy-to-understand summaries in English and Spanish for consumers. The app also includes information on HIV-related investigational drugs for both health care providers and consumers.

Available for both iOS and Android devices, users can personalize the free AIDSinfo Drug App to suit their needs:

  • Receive notifications when content is updated.
  • Bookmark frequently referenced drugs for easy access at any time.
  • Add personal notes to any drug.
  • Select from a menu of alarms to set pill reminders for any drug.

Stay tuned for additions to the AIDSinfo Drug App.

NIH News in Health

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Check out the December issue of NIH News in Health, the monthly newsletter bringing you practical health news and tips based on the latest NIH research. In this issue:

Feeling Stressed? Stress Relief Might Help Your Health
Winter holidays—do they fill you with joy or with worries about gift-giving and family gatherings? Do summer vacations leave you relaxed or fretful over travel and money? If you’re feeling stressed out over supposedly fun things, it might be time to reassess. Take a few moments to learn how stress affects your health and what you can do about it.

When Your Back Hurts: Don’t Let Back Pain Knock You Flat
Is your back hurting? You’re in good company. In any 3-month period, about 1 in 4 adults in the U.S. has at least one day of back pain, mostly in the lower back.

Detecting Rare Disease-Causing Glitches
For people with suspected rare genetic conditions, getting an accurate diagnosis can be difficult and frustrating. A new study suggests that a fast, powerful technique called whole-exome sequencing can help doctors pinpoint the causes of many hard-to-diagnose genetic conditions.

A Priceless Gift: Your Family Health History
Conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes often run in families. Tracing the illnesses of your parents, grandparents, and other blood relatives can help your health care practitioner predict your risk for specific disorders. It could suggest vital screening tests and treatments before any disease is evident. That’s why it’s so important to discuss your family’s health history.

Featured Website: Go4Life
This interactive site helps adults, ages 50 and older, to fit more physical activity into their days. A science-based exercise guide, videos, success stories, motivational tips, and free materials can help you get ready, start exercising, and keep moving.

NIH News in Health is available online in both HTML and PDF formats. Print copies are available free of charge for offices, clinics, community centers, and libraries within the U.S. Visit the NIH News in Health Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like to see covered, or share what you find helpful about the newsletter!

New Genetics/Genomics Information Subject Guide

Friday, December 5th, 2014

NLM released a new Genetics/Genomics Information subject guide as the latest update in the NLM subject guide series. These guides, based on our most frequently asked questions, are starting points for health professionals, researchers, librarians, students, and others. Other published guides in our series are about findings:

We will develop more subject guides as needed. We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions about all of our guides.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

All of us in MAR would like to wish you and your families a very Happy Thanksgiving!

  • Barbara Epstein, Renae Barger, Michelle Burda, Sue Burke, Lydia Collins, Kate Flewelling, Missy Harvey, and Tristan Lucchetti

Lending a Helping Hand: MAR Mentoring Program

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

If you cannot see where you are going, ask someone who has been there before. J Loren Norris

We know that in the ever changing environment of healthcare, hospital librarians have had to adapt their services and skills to these changes.  Those that have risen to the challenge of change have much to offer medical librarians new to the profession, new to health sciences librarianship,  and to those adapting to technology changes, or adapting to being a solo librarian.

  • Are you someone who could benefit from having a mentor?
  • Or are you someone who would like to share your expertise and experience with others?

If you answered Yes to either question, please contact Michelle Burda to learn about our new program: mburda@pitt.edu or (412) 624-1589.

Healthcare Access in Rural Communities

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

The Rural Assistance Center has a new guide addressing the challenges of healthcare access in rural areas and ways communities and policymakers can address these needs. Areas covered include workforce shortages, health insurance status, distance and transportation, poor health literacy and the stigma of certain conditions like mental health or substance abuse.

November is National Diabetes Month

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Thanksgiving is soon approaching, a time when many are giving thanks for food, family and health. Many favorite dishes are loaded with sugars and it is tempting to overeat. This can be a health issue for those with diabetes. Whether we have a family history or not, we shouldn’t deprive ourselves but rather, consider eating in moderation while enjoying a great feast.

The Diabetes Educator site provides a nice visual on how to divide your plate along with some healthier recipes: https://www.diabeteseducator.org/export/sites/aade/_resources/pdf/general/ThanksgivingPlateResource.pdf

The American Diabetes Association includes tips on navigating the Thanksgiving feast and other tips:

http://www.diabetes.org/mfa-recipes/tips/2012-11/navigating-the-holiday-feast.html
http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/holiday-meal-planning/

So go ahead and enjoy the feast but remember that if you’re thankful for your health, stuff that turkey and not yourself!

Here are some Thanksgiving Day suggestions:

  • Don’t wait to eat until the feast to avoid overeating.
  • Fill half your plate with vegetables but avoid or limit those that contain cream sauces or butter.
  • When filling your plate, take only a spoonful of the dishes you really enjoy and wait and see if you really are still hungry after eating before considering more.
  • Skip the bread and rolls.
  • Roast those sweet potatoes rather than smothering them in butter, sugar and marshmallows, roasting them at a high temperature (400-450 degrees) causes the sugars in the sweet potatoes to caramelize.
  • Use a sugar substitute when making pies.
  • Skip the whipped cream or the ice cream with the pie.
  • If bringing a dish, choose a fresh veggie platter with a hummus dip or a tossed salad of mixed greens with a vinaigrette dressing.
  • Eat slowly and take time to interact with those around you, good companionship can be just as satisfying as eating.
  • Before diving into that comfy chair take a walk around the block, it will help you feel better and keep you awake!

For more information about diabetes: MedlinePlus and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

Check Out Our Fall Issue of The MAReport!

Friday, November 21st, 2014