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Archive for the ‘Consumer Health’ Category

Helpful Ebola Information

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

For Science Educators: Environmental Health Student Resources

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides online environmental health student resources for students in grades 1-12.  The following resources are free and have been vetted by science professionals.  The resources can be used by science educators in their classrooms, in after-school programs, in home-school programs, and by students for their academic research assignments.

  • Environmental Health Student Portal (Grades 6-8):  Provides middle school students and educators with information on common environmental health topics such as water pollution, climate change, air pollution, and chemicals.
  • Toxicology Tutorials (Grades 9-12+):  Teach basic toxicology principles; written at the introductory college student level.
  • Household Products Database (Grades 6-12+):  Learn about the potential health effects of chemicals in common household products ranging from personal hygiene products to landscape care products.
  • ToxTown (Grades 6-12+):  Interactive guide to commonly encountered toxic substances. Includes classroom materials. Also available in Spanish.
  • TOXMAP (Grades 9-12+):  Uses maps of the United States to visually explore Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) sites and data from the EPA. Includes classroom materials.
  • Native Voices Exhibition Lesson Plans & Activities (Grades 6-12):  Familiarize students with Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian healthcare by using the NLM Native Voices exhibition Web site content materials.
  • ToxMystery (Grades 1-5):  Teaches elementary school students about toxic substances in the home. Game format; includes lesson plans and activities. Also available in Spanish.

Hospital Emergency Preparedness and Response during Superstorm Sandy

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

This 43-page document is a report from the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General, which found that 89% of hospitals in Superstorm Sandy-related declared disaster areas experienced “substantial challenges” responding to the storm, which affected Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York in October 2012.

Specifically, the 174 Medicare-certified hospitals in these three states that were examined for this report, stated that they struggled with interrelated infrastructure and resource sharing problems in the storm’s aftermath:  http://go.usa.gov/7pGA

NIH News in Health

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Steps Toward a Healthier Life

Diabetes raises your risk for heart disease, blindness, amputations, and other serious issues. But the most common type of diabetes, called type 2 diabetes, can be prevented or delayed if you know what steps to take.

Parkinson’s Disease
Understanding a Complicated Condition

Parkinson’s disease can rob a person of the ability to do everyday tasks that many of us take for granted. There’s no cure, but treatment can help.

Click here to download a PDF version for printing.

Visit our Facebook page to suggest topics you’d like us to cover, or let us know what you find helpful about the newsletter. We’d like to hear from you!

Please pass the word on to your colleagues about NIH News in Health. We are happy to send a limited number of print copies free of charge for display in offices, libraries or clinics. Just email us or call 301-402-7337 for more information.

Free Ebola PPE Training

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Next week is the New Jersey State Conference on EMS in Atlantic City, NJ.

During the pre-conference, they are offering a free Ebola Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Training Course:

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 

This two-hour course is intended to train emergency medical services personnel in the proper utilization of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when responding to suspect cases of Ebola.  This session will be offered twice at the times below (choose one to attend):

  • Session 1 / 1:30 – 3:30 pm
  • Session 2 / 3:30 – 5:30 pm

NOTE that there is a 50 person limit for each session.  The training is free; however, you must be pre-registered for the training to be admitted. 

Register:  CLICK HERE

For more information, download the complete Conference brochure: www.NJEMSConference.com

NLM’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) Rebranded as HealthReach

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

The National Library of Medicine’s Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN) resource was a national collaborative partnership with the principal focus of creating and making available a database of quality multilingual/multicultural, public health resources to professionals providing care to resettled refugees and asylees. In October 2014, NLM’s Specialized Information Services (SIS) broadened the scope of RHIN by rebranding it HealthReach.

This was done to better meet the needs of the diverse non-English and English as a second language speaking audiences. HealthReach continues to recognize the importance of providing refugee and asylee specific information while expanding the information provided to meet the needs of most immigrant populations. Over the next several months new resources will be added to the website. There is also a new Twitter feed, @NLM_HealthReach. There isn’t much change between the old RHIN and the new HealthReach; this was intentional to help with the continuity of service through the transition.

New York Public Radio and The New York Academy of Medicine Recapture a Piece of American Medical and Broadcast History

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

New York Public Radio and The New York Academy of Medicine Recapture a Piece of American Medical and Broadcast History

Launch Digital Archive of 1950s Radio Broadcasts on Health and Medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) and New York Public Radio (NYPR) have digitized and released a treasure trove of 1950s WNYC radio broadcasts that feature significant voices from the past and provide a unique view of the medical and health concerns of American in the 1950s. The broadcasts brought lectures from the groundbreaking NYAM series Lectures to the Laity and For Doctors Only out of the halls of the Academy to a broad public audience, offering a new form of access to timely discussions on medicine, health, and culture.

The 40 digitized lectures and talks are part of a collaboration between NYAM and WNYC, which was then owned and operated by the city. Highlights include talks featuring Leona Baumgartner, New York City’s first woman health commissioner; cancer pioneer Sydney Farber; American microbiologist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author René Dubos; acclaimed anthropologist and social critic Margaret Mead; Norbert Wiener, father of cybernetics; and discussion of the Freud Centenary and Lincoln’s doctors.

“NYAM’s innovative partnership with WNYC in the 1950s brought important medical discussions out of the Academy’s rooms and into the public’s living rooms,” said Lisa O’Sullivan, PhD, Director of the NYAM Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health. “Today, NYAM remains committed to making the history of medicine accessible to broad public audiences, and we are extremely pleased to partner with New York Public Radio to release this digital collection.”

“The combination of expertise has made for a project with perfect synergy,” said Andy Lanset, Director of Archives, New York Public Radio. “We’re thrilled to make such important recordings available to both the scientific/medical community, and the public at large.”

These lectures are drawn from the more than 1,500 original lacquer discs transferred from NYAM to the NYPR Archives in 2008. The digitization and cataloging resulted from a joint project between NYAM’s Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health and the NYPR Archives, with a grant from METRO, the New York Metropolitan Library Council.

NYAM and WNYC began their radio relationship in 1946 with the launch of The Laity Lectures, later to become Lectures to the Laity, a popular series of Academy lectures and talks on culture and medicine that had started in 1935. By mid-1950, this series was joined by For Doctors Only, which aimed to bring “the best of the meetings, conferences, roundtable discussions held at the academy” to the medical profession. On its debut broadcast of July 27, 1950, The New York Times called it “an epochal advance in the educational use of radio.” The New York World-Telegram and Sun referred to it as a “bold venture” and “enterprising” in the interest of good health for millions of people. For Doctors Only also addressed critical analysis of issues of society and medicine, as well as the application of the social sciences to medicine, and provided academic presentations in the history of medicine.

The lectures are available on WNYC’s website. Individual titles are also available through NYAM’s library catalog.

Paul Theerman, PhD

Associate Director

Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health

New York Academy of Medicine

1216 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY, 10029

212.822.7350

http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/

Ebola Videos in American Sign Language

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

NNLM friends,

Today we published our Ebola videos in American Sign Language (based on information provided by the CDC) that we created in partnership with the Ohio State University.  Would you be interested in helping us spread this information to the hospitals and medical libraries in your regions (as well as to other NN/LM regions).  Hospitals and medical libraries can contact Jeff Wolfe (Jeff@DeafHealth.org) with any questions.

The website is: DeafHealth.org/diseases/ebola

Thank you,

Casey Davis

Founder, www.DeafHealth.org

Webinar: Preparing for 2015 Open Enrollment-Reaching Special Populations

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

We welcome you to join us for a webinar: Preparing for 2015 Open Enrollment-Reaching Special Populations on Wednesday, November 5th.  Speakers from the CMS Office of Communications will be providing tips and resources on how to reach special populations such as Hispanic; African American; Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders; and people with Disabilities. We will also provide updates and resources for the 2015 Open Enrollment Season. We also encourage you to submit questions in advance to champion@cms.hhs.gov.

When:  Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. ET

Webinar link:  https://webinar.cms.hhs.gov/c4c11514/

Participant Number: (800) 837-1935

Conference ID: 27294127

-CMS Office of Communications, Partner Relations Group

National Hospice Palliative Care Month

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

November is National Hospice Palliative Care Month.

Hospice care refers to end-of-life care, with the goal to provide peace, comfort, and dignity for those dying.  The focus of the care is on comfort, not cure.  Hospice care can take place at home, or in a hospice center, hospital, or skilled nursing facility.

Palliative care treatment provides pain relief for serious illnesses and can be applied to anyone who is experiencing “discomforts, symptoms, and stress of a serious illness.”  With the goal to reduce discomfort, palliative care is always part of hospice care.

Visit the MedlinePlus topic pages on Hospice Care and Palliative Care for specific information on topics such as coping, specific health conditions, current NIH research and clinical trials, journal articles, and relevant organizations.