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Archive for August, 2012

TOXNET and Beyond CE Course

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Pick your poison!  From petrochemicals to pesticides.  From fluoride to flavorings.  From nanotechnology to nitrosamine.

Toxic substances lurk in the most unexpected places.  In your city.  In your neighborhood.  In your garage.  And probably under your kitchen sink.

When an accident happens, do you know where to find the information that just might save a life – or a community?  Most importantly, can you find it fast?

TOXNET and Beyond is a free six-hour, hands-on course to help information specialists quickly find authoritative resources on environmental health and toxicology as well as related health information.

The TOXNET course will be held on October 24th, 2012 from 9 am-4 pm at NYU Langone Medical Center at the Ehrman Medical Library.  Schedule and registration information is available at http://nnlm.gov/ntc.

Register now, before it is too late!

Joey Nicholson, MLIS MPH CPH

Education and Curriculum Librarian

NYU Health Sciences Libraries

Joseph.Nicholson@med.nyu.edu

10-Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Presenter: Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM MAR

Location:  Online

Date:  October 17 – November 17, 2012

Registration:   http://nnlm.gov/mar/training/register.html?schedule_id=1859

Description:  This course involves training medical librarians on the components of the NN/LM’s Emergency Preparedness & Response Plan:  10-Step Approach to Service Continuity.  This class will be divided into five one-hour sessions.  Two steps will be taught per session.  Participants who complete course requirements will be eligible for 5 MLA CE credits.  The goals of the class are to raise awareness of the need for emergency preparedness and response planning and to provide tools for enhancing preparedness for medical librarians.  Participants will learn how to conduct a basic risk assessment for their libraries, how to craft a basic emergency preparedness plan, strategies for continuing library services from off-site, and options for obtaining assistance, both web-based resources and through the NN/LM Emergency Preparedness & Response structure.

NLM’s K-12 Resources (Lunch with the RML session)

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Presenters:

  • Lydia Collins, Consumer Health Coordinator, NN/LM MAR
  • Elizabeth Irish, Assistant Director, Schaffer Library of the Health Sciences, Albany Medical College

Date:  August 30, 2012

Location:  Free, Online:  http://nnlm.gov/mar/ (the URL is posted the morning of each session)

Description:  The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has a variety of children’s resources that are freely available for use by librarians, K-12 educators and even parents.  Learn about resources in Biology, Careers, Environmental Health Science/Chemistry, General Health and Genetics. There will also be time for discussion surrounding how to implement these wonderful resources into your setting.  Also, Ms. Irish will share information about her current NN/LM MAR Award to provide outreach to the K-12 population.

A Seat at the Table: Working with Local Responders

Monday, August 20th, 2012

MLA eLearning Opportunity:  Free Web-based Disaster Course

Register now for the two-day web-based disaster course, A Seat at the Table:  Working with Local Responders.

The course is scheduled for August 29 – 30, 2012, 1 – 2:30 pm each day (Central Time).

Participants must log in each day and complete the assigned homework and can earn 4 MLA continuing education contact hours that can be applied to the Level II Advanced MLA Disaster Information Specialization:  http://www.mlanet.org/education/dis/local_responders.html.

MARDelivery Tutorial

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Presenter:  Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, NN/LM (MAR)

Locationhttps://webmeeting.nih.gov/new_mardelivery/

Date/Time:  August 24, 2012 at 10 – 11 am

Description:  Free online webinar for people interested in learning how to use the new version of MARDelivery.  We have just released a new version of this service and we hope you’ll try it out.

MARDelivery is a free service for Network members.   If your library has problems sending large email attachments, MARDelivery is the solution for you!  This service enables libraries to send links to ILL articles they lend, rather than emailing large attachments.

MARDelivery can also be used to support local document delivery within your institution.  Your patrons have access to articles delivered through MARDelivery for 14 days.

If you are interested in setting up a MARDelivery account, please go to:  http://nnlm.gov/mar/rsdd/mardelivery.html.

Revised Job Ad: Assistant Director, Clinical Services, New York, NY

Monday, August 20th, 2012

We have revised the minimum requirements for this position.  Additional Health Sciences degree no longer required.

We are hiring for a new position- Assistant Director, Clinical Services.  This is a wonderful opportunity to engage with the clinical communities at Weill Cornell Medical College.  The description is below and also available here:  http://library.weill.cornell.edu/About/career.html.  Please share with interested staff.

Position Title:  Assistant Director, Clinical Services

Status:  Full Time, Academic/Faculty

Starting Salary:  67K

Position Summary:

The Assistant Director, Clinical Services, Weill Cornell Medical Library, will build dynamic, collaborative relationships within the clinical and allied health departments of Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital and its affiliates.   Implements and evaluates innovative clinical support services and contributes to the development of research and knowledge within the health sciences.  Reports to the Associate Director, User Support, Research and Education, Weill Cornell Medical Library.

Position Activities:

  • Maintain and cultivate strong relationships to support the needs of allied health and clinical communities.
  • Supervise the library’s clinical support team.
  • Oversee, develop and implement clinical support services including, clinical librarianship program, systematic review service, and electronic medical record integration.
  • Determine the impact of services and resources offered via ongoing assessment.
  • Work collaboratively with faculty and students to assess and integrate information literacy skills within the medical school curriculum. Teach information literacy and evidence-based practice or other specialized classes in cooperation with library teaching faculty.
  • As a member of the user support team, answer clinical and reference questions, conduct literature searches, provide consultations and promote the use of library services and resources.
  • Keep abreast of new developments in education, information resources and clinical outreach services.

Minimum Requirements:

Master’s degree in Library Science from an ALA-accredited program.  An additional graduate degree in the health sciences or related field preferred.  Minimum of five years health sciences library or health care/biomedical environment experience.  Three to five years of leadership/supervisory experience. Experience working with clinical teams.  Demonstrated experience in the use of bibliographic research and clinical tools.  Excellent technical, written and verbal communication skills and teaching/presentation skills.  Able to work collaboratively in a team environment. Demonstrated initiative, the ability to manage multiple projects and a commitment to professional development.

Applicants should send cover letter, curriculum vitae, and the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of 3 references to Anny Khoubesserian, Administrative Manager, Weill Cornell Medical Library, 1300 York Ave., New York, NY 10065-4896, or e-mail to arevod@med.cornell.edu<mailto:arevod@med.cornell.edu>.  The Weill Medical College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and does not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment based on age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, creed, national origin, marital status, disability, citizenship or veteran status(EOE/M/F/D/V).

Diana Delgado, MLS, AHIP

Associate Director for User Support, Research and Education

Samuel J. Wood Library & C.V. Starr Biomedical Information Center

Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University

1300 York Avenue Room C-115

New York, NY 10065-4896

http://library.weill.cornell.edu<http://library.weill.cornell.edu/>.

Older Americans 2012: Key Indicators of Well-Being

Monday, August 20th, 2012

A federal interagency group has released an updated comprehensive federal look at aging, titled, “Older Americans 2012:  Key Indicators of Well-Being.”  The report tracks trends at regular intervals to see how older people are faring as the U.S. population grows older.  According to a National Institute on Aging summary, “In 2010, 40 million people age 65 and over accounted for 13 percent of the total population in the United States. In 2030, the number and proportion of older Americans is expected to grow significantly — to 72 million, representing nearly 20 percent of the population said the report, by the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics.”
http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/main_site/default.aspx

It’s All in the Name: Suffixes in Medicine and Science

Monday, August 20th, 2012

An article in the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday discussed the importance of suffixes in medicine and science.  The article starts, “In the beginning, there was the genome.  Then came the foldome, the phenome and the connectome, quickly followed by the secretome, the otherome and the unknome.  Over the past decade, a linguistic trickle swelled into a flood of buzzwords tagged with the curiously resonant suffix ‘ome.’  Today, hundreds of ‘omic’ terms have worked their way into the lexicon, coined mostly by scientists intent on creating new sub-specialties.  ’It sounds futuristic.  It sounds computational,’ said medical geneticist Robert C. Green at Harvard Medical School, who studies what he and his colleagues call the incidentalome—the realm of all incidental medical findings.  ’When you use the term ‘omics,’ it signals you are a new paradigm guy.’ ”  The article further reports, “Some scientists roll their eyes at this speedily spreading suffix.  ’It’s a language parasite,’ said evolutionary biologist Jonathan Eisen at the University of California, Davis.  They have even coined a word for their antipathy—the antiome.”  http://tinyurl.com/8hy7fts.

Red Cross Hurricane App

Monday, August 20th, 2012

The Red Cross Hurricane App provides access to local and real time information on what to do before, during and after hurricanes, including an “I’m safe” messaging alert.  Find it on the NLM Disaster Information Management Research Center “Disaster Apps and Mobile Optimized Web Pages” page: http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/disasterapps.html

Press Release from the Red Cross:  http://newsroom.redcross.org/2012/08/01/press-release-new-hurricane-app-brings-american-red-cross-safety-information-to-smart-phones/

How to Find Out If a Social Media Account is from the Government

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Every day, the government uses social media services like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube to communicate with you and provide easy access to government benefits and services.

But unlike most government websites, which are hosted on a .mil or a .gov domain, social media sites are hosted on commercial domains.  Without the .gov or the .mil, it can be difficult to determine which social media accounts are official government sources of information and which are impersonators.

To help solve that problem, we recently launched a social media registry in English and Spanish, where you can confirm the validity of a variety of government social media accounts.  Learn more about the social media registry.

Visit the social media registry to check the validity of government social media accounts.