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Message from the GMR Director about RML cooperative agreements for 2016-2021

Dear GMR members:

Today, the National Library of Medicine Board of Regents announced the Regional Medical Library cooperative agreements funded for the award period 2016-2021. University of Illinois at Chicago was not among the institutions listed. Read the rest of this entry »

Sometimes a post is worth repeating: AI

Cindy Olney of the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) posted the following regarding an Appreciative Inquiry (AI) session that she held for the GMR’s Outreach Librarians during a recent webinar. It is entitled “Inspirational Annual Reporting with Appreciative Inquiry“: http://nnlm.gov/evaluation/blog/2016/03/25/inspirational-annual-reporting-with-appreciative-inquiry/

Take a look. Perhaps you, too, will be inspired to try AI for your next report.

GMR Sponsoring April Webinar Sites

The GMR will sponsor the registration costs for up to two (2) sites per state in the region for this MLA Webinar.

  • Webinar: The Consumer Health Library: A Site for Service, Education, and Hope
  • Date/Time: Tuesday, April 26, 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m., Central time
  • Application Process: http://nnlm.gov/gmr/funding/mla-webinar
  • Application Deadline: Wednesday, April 6, 2016, Noon

Register your site today!

A limited number of sites can be sponsored; please work with your state and local health science librarian groups to identify centralized locations. For more information the webinar, visit:  The Consumer Health Library

Reproducible Science Events

Two upcoming events on reproducible science. Read the rest of this entry »

Making the case for active learning

By Dawn Hackman, M.S., AHIP,
Research & Education Librarian
University of North Dakota Library of the Health Sciences,
Grand Forks, ND

On January 8, 2016 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) hosted a workshop called “The Librarian and Active Learning Models,” which is available via the Medical Library Association’s Educational Clearinghouse. I worked with the SMHS’s Associate Dean for Teaching & Learning to identify a workshop on active learning that would be relevant to both librarians and faculty. We noticed that this workshop focused on three active learning methodologies that are common to medical education and might be effective at UND. (Incidentally, this workshop is being offered as CE at MLA’16 in Toronto…and I highly recommend it!) The co-instructors for the workshop are based out of the East Coast and so I knew the travel expenses would be considerable. To offset the cost to my library, I applied for (and received) a professional development grant through the GMR. This workshop wouldn’t have been possible without it.

My target audience changed between my application and the actual event. Originally I planned on inviting only medical librarians and a handful of SMHS faculty to attend. I targeted medical librarians, because the methodologies were presented in the context of medical education in the class description. However, I soon realized that all UND librarians should be invited, as we are increasingly working together to provide support to programs that have multidisciplinary connections (e.g. heath law, speech disorders, & music therapy). As far as faculty participation goes, we had 1-2 faculty representatives from each of the 9 programs that we support. I knew that faculty participation would be crucial for the success of this workshop, as they are the front line of instruction and curriculum. Case in point: after attending the workshop, the Music Therapy program chair reached out to her two subject liaisons (who also attended the workshop) and informed them that she would be reworking her entire syllabus later that evening to add active learning exercises that utilized the librarians’ presence and expertise! We’ve also had faculty attendees express interest in collaborating with librarians to present a poster or paper on this topic at relevant educational and library conferences. Read the rest of this entry »

Recipients of the AAHSL Data Scholarships

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) recently announced the recipients of the AAHSL Data Scholarships. Read the rest of this entry »

Showing the Value of Libraries to Users

Notice how this article, Your LA library card can save you thousands of dollars, here’s how, reminds people that public libraries now may provide access to costly electronic resources. For public libraries in Los Angeles has the article shows the resources–instructional videos, digital magazines, language educational resources, digital and audiobooks, and a legal advice resource–and their costs.

 

Zika Information and the Flint Public Library Response

NLM’s Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) updated the Zika virus resource list on March 7.  DIMRC also gathered a list of free resources from publishers for medical responders.

The Flint Public Library continues to respond to the water crisis as reported in Public Libraries Online in the article, Flint Public Library: A Gateway to Critical Information.

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Emergency Preparedness in the GMR

The GMR Office coordinates the Emergency Preparedness program and monitors disasters in the region. Activities are outlined in the report below; this includes the webpage, confirming state Emergency Preparedness coordinators, training, and responses to the Flint water supply concerns and zika. Read the rest of this entry »

Applying Appreciative Inquiry to My Project

By Carmen Howard
Regional Health Sciences Librarian & Visiting Assistant Professor
UIC Library of the Health Sciences Peoria

At the January 2016 GMR Outreach Librarians Webinar, I spoke about the NExT (project (phnext.uic.edu) that is being done by the University of Illinois at Chicago and Western Illinois University with the support of the GMR.  As many of you already know since I’ve written about NExT for The Cornflower before, it is a huge and frequently overwhelming project.  We’ve assembled a large, geographically-dispersed, interdisciplinary team, and we have managed to accomplish quite a lot of pretty great things for public health professionals.  But honestly, it is a lot of work too.  It seems that there is always one more thing that we really ought to do or a small adjustment that would just make the project even better.  So when I was asked to participate in an Appreciative Inquiry exercise as part of the webinar, I’ll admit that that was the first thing that ran through my mind – “ok here is one more thing to add to the to-do list”.

However, I’m happy to say that I actually got far more out of the experience than I put into it.  If you attended the webinar, you have already heard Cindy Olney’s great presentation on Appreciative Inquiry, or AI.  If you could not attend, AI is an easy exercise that focuses on three questions.  Here is what Cindy asked me:  Read the rest of this entry »