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Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Tech Trends for 2012

Monday, December 19th, 2011

Here we go again! Time to look at potential tech trends for the next year. While it has barely even snowed yet in Chicago nor really gotten that cold, it is definitely December.

This first set of tech trends comes from Jason Hiner at Tech Republic. He reported on the Gartner Group’s annual symposium where they revealed their list of the 10 most strategic tech trends of 2012. Drum roll, please:

  1. Media tablets and beyond – the era of Microsoft and PC domination coming to a close
  2. Mobile-centric applications and interfaces – building user interfaces for multiple screen sizes
  3. Contextual and social user experience – using information about an end user to improve the quality of the interaction with the device
  4. Internet of Things – objects acting as user of other systems
  5. App stores and marketplaces – a new term emerges: apptepreneurs
  6. Next-gen analytics – mobile devices being able to self-analyze for full optimization
  7. Big data – new and exotic technologies are required to manage the extreme volume of data created today
  8. In-memory computing – faster response time in analytical operations
  9. Extreme low-energy servers – new entrants to the server business proposing a radical way for future servers to work
  10. Cloud computing – cloud computing was very recently number one and now is number ten. This is significant that it is viewed as not living up to its hype.

Pete Cashmore, the editor of Mashable, shares his list of the Top 10 Technology Trends for 2012.
As he points out, “Predicting what will happen in 2012, therefore, is a shot in the dark: A year is virtually a lifetime in the digital era.”

  1. Touch Computing – we’ll be using our mice less often and increasingly using desktop computers in similar ways to how we use tablets and smartphones.
  2. Social Gestures – ‘frictionless sharing’ – where with the click of a button you can share what you are doing from services like Spotify, to social networks (once you authorize it of course)
  3. NFC and Mobile Payments – with the success of the Square Payment dongle for iPhone, and NFC (Near Field Communication) in 2011, awareness of this technology will likely make it more popular in 2012…it’s not without a lot of security concerns…
  4. Beyond the iPad – the iPad costs $499′ the Kindle Fire is $199. There has been speculation that while the iPad is king today, it may lose the crown in 2012.
  5. TV everywhere – with the rise of the tablet, it’s easier to have ‘TV in your hand’ but the cable companies have ways to keep you tethered to subscriptions.
  6. Voice Control – thanks to the popularity of Siri and the iPhone 4S, voice recognition and voice search will show up on more devices.
  7. Spatial Gestures – personally, I was fascinated with the technology in the movie Minority Report and hope I see it in my lifetime. Microsoft Kinect is an example of using spatial gestures in current technology.
  8. Second-Screen Experiences – Cashmore says, “It refers to apps (mainly on the iPad) that listen to the audio output of your TV and display content related to the show or movie you’re watching.” An example from the music industry is Gracenote.
  9. Flexible Screens – Can you imagine a phone that rolls up in your pocket, or one that you can slip into your wallet like a dollar bill? Bendable interfaces will be seen more in 2012, though it’s likely to not be fully implemented for a number of years.
  10. HTML5 – this fifth version of HTML, could take the place of Flash on many mobile devices.

What are your predictions for 2012?

By the way, this blog post was written on an iPad using touch technology!

Holocaust Memorial Exhibit at Taubman

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

By Kate Saylor
Outreach Librarian
University of Michigan
Taubman Health Sciences Library

DeadMed logo

The Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan will host the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race. The exhibition illustrates how Nazi leadership enlisted people in professions traditionally charged with healing and the public good, to legitimize persecution, murder and, ultimately, genocide. Deadly Medicine, which is cosponsored by the University of Michigan’s Center for the History of Medicine, will premiere on February 3, 2012 on the 4th floor of the Taubman Health Sciences Library and runs through April 13, 2012.

Accompanying the exhibition will be an opening reception and closing reflections panel discussion. Event details will be announced at a later date.

“Deadly Medicine explores the Holocaust’s roots in then-contemporary scientific and pseudo-scientific thought,” explains exhibition curator Susan Bachrach. “At the same time, it touches on complex ethical issues we face today, such as how societies acquire and use scientific knowledge and how they balance the rights of the individual with the needs of the larger community.”Deadly Medicine is based on the acclaimed exhibition of the same name that opened at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., in April 2004. An online version is viewable at http://www.ushmm.org/deadlymedicine.

The Nazi regime was founded upon the conviction that “inferior races” and individuals had to be eliminated from German society so that the fittest “Aryans” could thrive. By the end of World War II, six million Jews and millions of others—among them Roma and Sinti (Gypsies), people diagnosed as hereditarily ill, homosexuals, and others belonging to ethnic groups deemed inferior—had been persecuted and murdered. Join us as we explore this dark chapter in history and its legacy on the health profession today.

Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race

Location: Taubman Health Sciences Library – 1135 E. Catherine St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (http://www.lib.umich.edu/thl)

Dates and Times: The exhibition will be viewable February 3 – April 13, 2012 during library hours.

This display is cosponsored by the U-M Taubman Health Sciences Library and the U-M Center for the History of Medicine.Exhibition and events are free and open to the public.

For more information contact Kate Saylor at 734.936.1394 or kmacdoug@umich.edu

 

Become a GMR Sponsored site for the MLA Webinar on E-Science

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

The GMR is offering to sponsor a number of sites for the upcoming MLA Webinar: Connecting E-science and Team Science: The Changing Nature of Research to be held on Friday, November 18, 2011, from 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m., CST.

Visit: http://nnlm.gov/gmr/funding/mlawebcast/ for detailed information on how to become a sponsored site.

The GMR will cover the registration costs for up to two (2) sites per state in the region for this webcast. Because of the limited number of sites we can sponsor, we encourage you to work with your state and local librarian groups to identify centralized locations. Sites will be selected based on geographical location, accessibility, and potential number of attendees.

The deadline to email/fax your registration and email additional information to the GMR is NOON, Wednesday, October 26, 2011.

Contact Holly Burt at the GMR, if you have any questions and for more information on this webcast, visit:
http://www.mlanet.org/education/distance_ed/escience/escience_webinar.html

IFTTT – If This Then That – New Way to Visualize Data

Thursday, September 15th, 2011

One of my biggest issues with the Internet is how there are still a lot of silos.  What do I mean by silo? Programs or applications that work ‘alone’ and don’t share well with other applications.  I am still a big user of RSS despite rumors of it’s demise.  I tend to star items in Google Reader so that I can read them later.  What if I also wanted to read it later and send it to Twitter – or maybe send it to Instapaper? Especially with Instapaper, I would have to go through the trouble of copying the url and then opening up Instapaper and pasting it in there so I could read it later.  It would be nice to have this kind of thing automated.  I’m not a programmer so I end up waiting and relying on much smarter and clever people to create a tool that can do this for me.

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GMR RAC Members Announced

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

The GMR is pleased to announce the 20 members of the 2011-2016 Regional Advisory Council (RAC). Members include the 10 representatives chosen by their state’s health sciences library group (indicated by state) and additional members selected for their varieties of expertise. Welcome new RAC members!

  • Mary Blackwelder, Medical College of Wisconsin Todd Wehr Library, Milwaukee, WI
  • Jane Blumenthal, University of Michigan Taubman Medical Library,Ann Arbor, MI
  • Pam Bradigan, Ohio State University Prior Health Sciences Library, Columbus, OH
  • Arlis Dittmer, Blessing Health System, Blessing Health Professions Library, Quincy, IL
  • Liz Fine (MN), University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries, Minneapolis, MN
  • Martha Hardy, Metropolitan State University Library Services, St. Paul, MN
  • Heather Holmes, Summa Health System Medical Library, Akron, OH
  • Matt Hoy (WI), Mayo Clinic Health System Eau Claire Library and AV Services, Eau Claire, WI
  • Rhona S. Kelley (IL), Southern Illinois University School of Medicine Library, Springfield, IL
  • Joyce Lindstrom (IA), Des Moines University Medical Library, Des Moines, IA
  • Mike McGraw (OH), Case Western Reserve University Cleveland Health Sciences Library, Cleveland, OH
  • Cody McSellers-McCray, Westside Health Authority, Chicago, IL
  • Barbara Platts (MI), Munson Healthcare Library Services, Traverse City, MI
  • Elizabeth Rowan (KY), Shriners Hospital for Children Library/Learning Resource Center, Lexington, KY
  • Travis Schultz (ND), Medcenter One Health Library, Bismarck, ND
  • James Shedlock, Northwestern University Galter Health Sciences Library, Chicago, IL
  • Elaine Skopelja (IN), Indiana University School of Medicine Library, Indianapolis, IN
  • Corey B. Smith PhD, Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board, Northern Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center, Rapid City, SD
  • Janet Stith,University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center Library, Lexington, KY
  • Molly Youngkin (SD), Wegner Health Science Information Center, Sioux Falls, SD

GMR Update for July 2011 now online

Friday, July 15th, 2011

The GMR Update for July 2011 is now available online at the following URL:
http://nnlm.gov/gmr/about/gmrupdate.html

Check the contract updates, new communication technologies and information about upcoming exhibits and training opportunities.

Happy summer!

Public Health Information Outreach at MCW Libraries

Monday, June 20th, 2011

By Emily Schearer
Outreach Librarian
Medical College of Wisconsin Libraries

The Medical College of Wisconsin Libraries recently wrapped up its Health-E Public project with the Citizens and Organizations Active in Disaster and Medical Reserve Corps of Southeastern Wisconsin. The project was funded by a Public Health award from the NN/LM Greater Midwest Region.

The award allowed us to provide hands-on workshops and both formal and informal presentations for audiences working and volunteering in public health related fields. In addition to providing training on the use of PubMed, MedlinePlus, Toxnet and other resources, we were also able to advertise the availability of LoansomeDoc services to a number of people that had limited or no access to full-text articles.

Throughout the project, we found that many people who wished to attend workshops or presentations were often called out of the office for last-minute flu vaccine clinics or other duties in the community. For this reason, it became necessary to provide a great deal of information via email and electronic formats. Overall, the project allowed us to connect and solidify relationships with community organizations that we had little contact wither previously. We gained a better understanding of the information needs of public health professionals and volunteers, and are better equipped to serve them as they continue their work in Milwaukee and surrounding counties.

Spreading the Word about Informed Caring

Monday, June 20th, 2011

By Mandy Meloy
Student Programs Coordinator
Wisconsin AHEC
Madison, WI

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region (NN/LM GMR) funded Wisconsin AHEC to promote InformedCaring.org, portal for Wisconsin health professionals. This site was designed to serve those working in local health departments, federally qualified community health centers, and others providing health services in rural and underserved communities in Wisconsin — particularly those without access to academic or hospital libraries.

With GMR funds, we coordinated with 12 public health departments, Community Health Centers, and partners to train staff, share ideas, gain useful feedback, and spread the word about InformedCaring.org. Trudging through harsh weather conditions, we reached 145 in-person staff. In the west, we reached Monroe County Health Department, Western Region Public Health Nurses and Health Directors Meeting in Eau Claire, and Scenic Bluffs Community Health Center. In central Wisconsin, we traveled to Wood County Health Department, Bridge Community Health Center, University of Wisconsin’s ICTR (Institute for Clinical and Translational Research) Community-Academic Partnership Steering Committee, LEAP (Linking Education and Practice for Excellence in Public Health Nursing Project), and the Wisconsin Department of Public Health. In the east, we ventured to Manitowoc County Health Department and Ozaukee County Health Department. In snow, we finally reached the north woods to present to the Oneida County Health Department. (more…)

6th Annual Taylorville Intertribal Black Horse Pow Wow

Friday, June 10th, 2011

By Fran E. Kovach MLIS
Reference & Education Librarian
Southern Illinois University School of MedicineSpringfield, IL

On June 3-5, 2011, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine Library participated in the 6th Annual Taylorville Intertribal Black Horse Pow Wow in Taylorville, Illinois, at the Christian County Fairgrounds. This is our third year participating in the event.

Special guests this year were the Alaskan runners, North American Indian athletes from McMasters University who stopped by on their run to the World Peace and Prayer conference in Minneapolis, MN. Others attending were from the Christian and Sangamon county areas and the states of Iowa and Arkansas. Nations represented were from Alaskan, Apache, Blackfeet, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Mohawk, Meskwaki, Navajo, and Sioux tribal affiliations. Dancing, drumming, singing, and returning to a traditional diet of Native American foods such as corn, squash, beans, berries, and melons can improve physical, mental, and spiritual health. American Indian Health Information, MedlinePlus consumer health information and NIH Senior Health pamphlets, bookmarks, and pens were distributed from our exhibit booth.

See http://noteslibrary.blogspot.com/ for photos from the event.

Change to ILL National Maximum Base Cost

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

The “National Maximum Charge” that limited Resource Libraries to charging $11 was removed as a requirement for Resource Libraries in the NN/LM contracts for 2011-2016. The change was effective May 1, 2011. As needed, Resource Libraries may raise ILL fees to recover costs. Primary Access Libraries and Other libraries were already able to charge fees necessary for cost recovery. As always, all charges and provided services must comply with copyright law.

NLM removed the $11 limit because multiple requests were received from Resource Libraries, who stated they were unable to recover their costs at $11 per article. Additionally, Resource Libraries were permitted to charge above the $11 limit via surcharges, which caused confusion among network members in regards to the expected charge. The removal of the National Maximum permits all libraries in the Network to charge cost recovery based fees.

As a point of reference on lending, during the previous contract period of May 2006-May 2011, Primary Access Libraries filled nearly 43% of the DOCLINE requests. Resource Libraries filled just over 31% of the requests. “Other” libraries lent just over 22% of requests.

We recommend that libraries changing their fees provide adequate notice to their regular borrowers, and through regional announcement lists. Borrowers may wish to review their Routing Tables. Borrowers unable to find a lender can route requests to NLM, whose base ILL fee remains unchanged at $9.

If libraries need assistance with Routing Tables, searching for lending partners, or other aspects of DOCLINE, please contact Max Anderson