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OERC Blog

A Weblog from the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Archive for the ‘Practical Evaluation’ Category

Updated Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI)

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Peer county mapsThe OERC is excited to get the word out about the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s newly updated and redesigned Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI).  The new CHSI 2015 represents the collaboration of public health partners in the public, non-profit and research communities, including the National Library of Medicine.

The OERC recommends the CHSI as a possible resource in the data gathering portion of planning outreach projects or needs assessments. CHSI 2015 is an interactive online tool that produces health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States. Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes that describe the population health status of a county. What makes CHSI 2015 an important tool is that it includes comparisons to “peer counties” – groups of counties that are similar to each other based on 19 variables, including population size, percent high school graduates and household income.

CHSI Summary Comparison ReportFor each county, CHSI 2015 provides a Summary Comparison Report.  Using Karen Vargas’ childhood home of Union County, PA as an example, this report (right) shows that in the case of the overall cancer death rate, Union County does better than most of its peer counties.  But in the case of stroke death rate, they do worse.

Distribution Display – bar chartsBy selecting a specific indicator, such as coronary heart disease death rate, the interactive CHSI 2015 will produce a bar chart showing Union County in comparison to its peer counties, as well as the US median and the Healthy People 2020 target (left).

More detailed, downloadable data for each peer county can also be found (below), as well as a web page detailing the sources of the data for each indicator. CHSI 2015 provides a helpful How to use CHSI web page that explains each feature and provides helpful hints.

Distribution data in a downloadable format

CHSI 2015 is designed to complement other available sources of community health indicators including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s County Health Rankings and Roadmaps.

What Shapes Health? A Story about Data Visualization

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Medicaid birth map 2006-08

It was an amazing a-ha moment. We kind of blinked at each other, and then simultaneously said ‘We got to do something.’ – Dr. Nancy Hardt, University of Florida

This week on National Public Radio’s (NPR) All Things Considered was a story of what happened when Dr. Nancy Hardt, an OB-GYN, used data from Medicaid birth records to see where children were born into poverty in Gainesville, FL to try and identify ways to intervene and prevent poor childhood health outcomes. She was surprised to see a 1 square mile high-density ‘hot spot’ of births in dark blue appear in her map above. Dr. Hardt was encouraged to share her map with Sheriff Sadie Darnell, who pulled out a map of her own of Gainesville.

Sheriff Darnell’s map showed an exact overlay with the ‘hot spot’ on Dr. Hardt’s map of the highest crime rates in the city. By visiting the area they identified many things in the community that were barriers to good health including hunger, substandard housing, and a lack of medical care facilities – the closest location for uninsured patients was a 2 hour bus ride each way to the county health department. You’ll want to check out the rest of A Sheriff and A Doctor Team Up to Map Childhood Trauma to learn more about a mobile health clinic, what data from additional maps showed, and other steps they have taken since to help improve health outcomes for the community.

This story is the latest from the NPR series What Shapes Health, which was inspired in response to a recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation poll about what beliefs and concerns Americans have regarding health. You can read an overview and download the full report of their results at http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2015/01/what-shapes-health.html.

OERC’s Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Data Dashboard Example

Have you ever found yourself trying to do an evaluation activity, but needing that one helpful tool? Or perhaps you need a step-by-step guide on how to do a community assessment, or are looking for ways to build evaluation into a project that you are planning?

The OERC has an online guide called Tools and Resources for Evaluation that you and your library can use to evaluate your programs. Here are some of the types of tools and resources described in the Guide.

Community Oriented Outreach

  • Tips on successful collaborations and tools for improving collaboration with community networks
  • Toolkits for practical participatory evaluation and processes for conducting outcome-based evaluations

Evaluation Planning

  • Step-by-step guides on incorporating evaluation planning into your outreach projects
  • Instructions on using logic models for program planning

Data Collection and Analysis

  • Tips for questionnaire development
  • Resources for statistical methods of data analysis
  • Guides for analyzing qualitative and quantitative data

Reporting and Visualizing

  • Help with creating popular data dashboards
  • Descriptions of data visualization methods
  • Tools and TEDtalks about how you will present your data

Another Coffee Break: Word and Excel Templates

Friday, February 6th, 2015

AEA Coffee

Here at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) we began 2015 blogging about the CDC Coffee Breaks. For February we’re offering a refill by featuring some notes from a recent American Evaluation Association (AEA) coffee break webcast. Unlike the CDC, the 20 minute AEA coffee break webcasts are not freely available to the public but are an included benefit of AEA membership. The webcast briefly covered best practices in data visualization using two commonly available resources (Microsoft Word and Excel) and how to automate use of them by creating templates for report format consistency and easier workflow.

Some great resources to learn more how to do this and bookmark for future reference include

Specific for Word

Specific for Excel

 

52 Weeks of Better Evaluation

Friday, January 30th, 2015

BetterEvaluation.org is an international collaboration that encourages sharing of evaluation methods, approaches and processes for improvement. BetterEvaluation offers yearly blog themes for their staff and guest writers to focus on, and have wrapped up the highlights of their ’52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation’ 2014 theme in a post at http://betterevaluation.org/node/4682 For 2015 they are featuring ’12 Months of BetterEvaluation’ with multiple posts during a month, starting with impact evaluation in January.

A ‘top 5′ selection from the ‘52 Weeks of BetterEvaluation‘ post that is likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members includes

  1. Top ten developments in qualitative evaluation over the past decade (link to part 1, part 2)
  2. Fitting reporting methods to evaluation findings and audiences (link)
  3. Infographics, including step by step instructions in piktochart (link)
  4. Innovation in evaluation (link)
  5. Presenting data effectively (link)

Freebie Friday: Measuring Success Toolkit

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Measurement and Evaluation Staircase

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is a form of assessment used to help improve the performance and achievement of program results and often used by both non-government organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. The staircase diagram above describes six questions that M&E can help answer through program planning, monitoring, and evaluation. More information clarifying the difference between monitoring and evaluation as well as guidance for each of the six questions is available at this link.

While not specific to health information outreach programs, the Measuring Success Toolkit at  https://www.urbanreproductivehealth.org/toolkits/measuring-success from the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative is about health program planning, monitoring and evaluation. The toolkit provides helpful resources from the initiative’s multi-country perspective of working with the urban poor and the significant health disparities they face that may be helpful to consult with your health information outreach partners to underserved communities.  It includes subject-specific M&E resources such as maternal & child health and HIV/AIDs, and the resources within the toolkit are selected by M&E experts and reviewed quarterly following established criteria to identify important resources from diverse perspectives that include accurate, up to date information.

Say No to Spaghetti: Effective Data Graphs

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Line graph with 5 multicolor lines jumbled together

The illustration above is from Stephanie Evergreen‘s excellent blog post that caution is needed with the use of line graphs in a chart to show change over time for multiple organizations so you don’t end up with a brightly colored bowl of spaghetti. The solution to passing on this pasta effect? Creating small multiple graphs, such as by each region in this example, which are done one at a time using the same scale as the original graph then stitched together with alignment tools including a ruler and Align > Align Top commands in your graphing software. Be sure to see the end result and step by step guidance on how to create these at http://stephanieevergreen.com/declutter-dataviz-with-small-multiples/

Showing change over time as a line graph instead of a bar graph is one of the quantitative data focus areas in our Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) webinar Data Burger: A ‘Good’ Questionnaire Response Rate Plus Basic Quantitative Analysis. You can listen to a recording of the Data Burger presentation for the Mid Atlantic Region at https://webmeeting.nih.gov/p2mn6k7tkv6/, and please contact us if you’d like to hear more about this or one of our other webinars.

More Qualitative Data Visualization Ideas

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

In September, we blogged about a way to create qualitative data visualizations by chunking a long narrative into paragraphs with descriptive illustrations.

Ann Emery has shown six additional ways to create qualitative data visualization: 1) Strategic world cloud use (one word or before/after comparisons), 2) Quantitative + Qualitative combined (a graph of percentages and a quote from an open-ended text comment) 3) Photos alongside participant responses (only appropriate for non-anonymized data) 4) Icon images beside text narratives 5) Diagrams explaining processes or concepts (the illustration of a health worker’s protective gear from Ebola in the Washington Post is a great example) and 6) Graphic timelines. See these examples and overviews on how to make your own at  http://annkemery.com/qual-dataviz/

Do you need more information about reporting and visualizing your data? We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have more resources available for you from the Reporting and Visualizing tab of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Guide at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools and welcome your suggestions for additional resources to include and your comments.

Literature Search Strategy Week at AEA

Friday, November 7th, 2014

We at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) have previously covered the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) tip-a-day blog at http://aea365.org/blog as a helpful resource. This week posts about literature search strategies were shared on the AEA blog by Network member librarians from the Lamar Soutter Library at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Have you been involved in a similar collaboration? Please let us know, we’d love to feature your work in a future OERC blog post!

Literature Search Strategy Week

  1. Best Databases – learn the most effective starting points for biomedical, interdisciplinary, specialized, and a handy Top Ten list of literature databases.
  2. Constructing a Literature Search – learn the value of a vocabulary roadmap, and the difference between keyword and controlled vocabulary searching.
  3. Grey Literature – strategies for understanding these non-traditional but highly valuable information resources and starting points on where to find them.
  4. Using MyNCBI – learn how to sign up for your free account, save your PubMed search strategies, receive email updates, customize your display and more.
  5. Citation Management – featuring both freely available and other options you may have access to through your academic organizations.

Freebie Friday: CDC Program Evaluation Resources

Friday, October 17th, 2014

CDC Program Evaluation Guide Cover

Are you new to evaluation or need assistance with planning and implementing program evaluation resources from a public or community health perspective for your projects?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a freely available ‘how to’ resource for you with an Introduction to Program Evaluation for Public Health Programs: A Self Study Guide. Examples of public and community health programs that can be considered for program evaluation include direct service interventions, community-based mobilization efforts, research initiatives into issues such as health disparities, advocacy work, and training programs. The guide is available online or as a PDF download that consists of a six step process (from Engaging Stakeholders to Ensure Use of Evaluation Findings), a helpful Glossary of program evaluation terminology, and Resources for additional publications, toolkits and more to support public and community health program evaluation work.

A related CDC guide (A Framework for Program Evaluation) is one of several resources we at the Outreach Evaluation Resource Center (OERC) feature in the Evaluation Planning section of our Tools and Resources for Evaluation Page at http://guides.nnlm.gov/oerc/tools

 

Last updated on Saturday, 23 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract # HHS-N-276-2011-00008-C.