Skip all navigation and go to page content

OERC Blog

NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Archive for the ‘Library Value’ Category

Improving Your Data Storytelling in 30 Days

Friday, August 21st, 2015

Here are some more great techniques to help with telling a story to report your evaluation data so it will get the attention it deserves.

Friends at campfire telling storiesJuice Analytics has this truly wonderful collection of resources in a guide called “30 Days to Data Storytelling.” With assignments of less than 30 minutes a day, this guide links to data visualization and storytelling resources from sources as varied as Pixar, Harvard Business Review, Ira Glass, the New York Times, and Bono (yes, that Bono).

The document is a checklist of daily activities lasting no longer than 30 minutes per day. Each activity is either an article to read, a video to watch, or a small project to do.

The resources answer valuable questions like:

  • What do you do when you’re stuck?
  • How do I decide between visual narrative techniques?
  • Where can I find some examples of using data visualization to tell a story?

Infographics Basics: A Picture is Worth 1000 Data Points

Friday, April 24th, 2015

Open Access Week at University of Cape Town infographicYou’ve been collecting great data for your library, and now you have to figure out how to use it to convince someone of something, for example how great your library is. Part of the trick is turning that data into a presentation that your stakeholders understand – especially if you are not there to explain it.  Infographics are images that make data easy to understand in a way that gets your message across.

It turns out it doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive to create your own infographics.  Last week I went to a hands-on workshop at the Texas Library Association called “Infographics: One Picture is  Worth 1,000 Data Points,” taught by Leslie Barrett, Education Specialist from the Education Service Center Region 13 in Austin, TX. Using this website as her interactive “handout” http://r13hybrarian.weebly.com/infographicstla.html, Leslie walked us through the process of creating an infographic (and as a byproduct of this great class, she also demonstrated a number of free instructional resources, such as Weebly, Padlet, and Thinglink).

Starting at the top of the page, click on anything with a hyperlink.  You will find a video as well as other “infographics of infographics”  which demonstrate how and why infographics can be used.  There are also a variety of examples to evaluate as part of the learning process.

Finally, there is information on the design process and resources that make infographics fairly easy to create.  These resources, such as Piktochart and Easelly, have free subscriptions for simple graphics and experimenting.

Leslie Barrett allowed us to share this website with you, so feel free to get started making your own infographics!

Image credit: Open Access Week at University of Cape Town by Shihaam Donnelly / CC BY SA 3.0

New Journal: Systematic Reviews

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

Librarians’ expert searching skills provide some great opportunities for collaboration with researchers. Biomed Central’s new open access Systematic Reviews journal is about a specialized type of expert searching that librarians can provide for their communities. More than a source of protocols and a record of others’ work, this journal has great potential for those of us in academia who want to publish articles to share information with our colleagues about what we have done.

Here’s more information from the Aims and Scope:

Systematic Reviews encompasses all aspects of the design, conduct and reporting of systematic reviews. The journal aims to publish high quality systematic review products including systematic review protocols, systematic reviews related to a very broad definition of health, rapid reviews, updates of already completed systematic reviews, and methods research related to the science of systematic reviews, such as decision modeling. The journal also aims to ensure that the results of all well-conducted systematic reviews are published, regardless of their outcome.

It is a long-term goal of the journal to ensure all systematic reviews are prospectively registered in an appropriate database, such as PROSPERO, as these resources for registration become available and are endorsed by the scientific community.

Article types include:

  • Research Articles
  • Commentaries
  • Letters
  • Methodologies
  • Protocols
  • Review Updates

The editors-in-chief comprise an international group hailing from the University of Ottawa; the RAND corporation and UCLA; and the University of York.

Take a look at this journal! It could be a source of inspiration for any librarian whose emphasis is on expert searching.

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship: 9 days in southern CA; full scholarships available

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Do you want to learn about how your user groups and communities find and use information? Do you want to gather evidence to demonstrate that your work is making a difference?

Exciting news! You can work on these questions, and questions like them, June 16-26, 2014!

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship is a great opportunity for an academic librarian who is interested in conducting research. Research and evaluation are not necessarily identical, although they do employ many of the same methods and are closely related. This Institute is open to academic librarians from all over the country. If your proposal is accepted, your attendance at the Institute will be paid for, as will your travel, lodging, and food expenses.

The William H. Hannon Library has received a three-year grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to offer a nine-day continuing education opportunity for academic and research librarians. Each year 21 librarians will receive instruction in research design and a full year of support to complete a research project at their home institutions. The summer Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) is supplemented with pre-institute learning activities and a personal learning network that provides ongoing mentoring. The institutes will be held on the campus of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California.

The Institute is particularly interested in applicants who have identified a real-world research question and/or opportunity. It is intended to

“bring together a diverse group of academic and research librarians who are motivated and enthusiastic about conducting research but need additional training and/or other support to perform the steps successfully. The institute is designed around the components of the research process, with special focus given to areas that our 2010 national survey of academic librarians identified as the most troublesome; the co-investigators on this project conducted the survey to provide a snapshot of the current state of academic librarian confidence in conducting research. During the nine-day institute held annually in June, participants will receive expert instruction on research design and small-group and one-on-one assistance in writing and/or revising their own draft research proposal. In the following academic year, participants will receive ongoing support in conducting their research and preparing the results for dissemination.”

Your proposal is due by February 1, 2014. Details are available at the Institute’s Prepare Your Proposal web site.

Factoid: Loyola Marymount is on a bluff above the Pacific Ocean, west of central LA.

New, Improved, and Available Now!

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

The 2nd Edition of the Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach Projects series of 3 booklets is now available online:

Getting Started with Community-Based Outreach (Booklet 1)
What’s new? More emphasis and background on the value of health information outreach, including its relationship to the Healthy People 2020 Health Communication and Health Information Technology topic areas

Planning Outcomes-Based Outreach Projects (Booklet 2)
What’s new? Focus on uses of the logic model planning tool beyond project planning, such as providing approaches to writing proposals and reports.

Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data (Booklet 3)
What’s new? Step-by-step guide to collecting, analyzing, and assessing the validity (or trustworthiness) of quantitative and qualitative data, using questionnaires and interviews as examples.

These are all available free to NN/LM regional offices and network members. To request printed copies, send an email to nnlm@uw.edu.

Non-508 compliant pdf versions of all three booklets are available here: http://nnlm.gov/evaluation/guides.html#A2 .

The Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach series, by Cynthia Olney and Susan Barnes, supplements and summarizes material in Cathy Burroughs’ groundbreaking work from 2000, Measuring the Difference: Guide to Planning and Evaluating Health Information Outreach. Printed copies of Burroughs’ book are also available free—just send an email request to nnlm@uw.edu.

The Value of Academic Libraries

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Last year the Association of College and Research Libraries issued a very substantial and thorough review of the research that has been done on how to measure library value:  “The Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report” by Megan Oakleaf.  Althought its focus is academia, there are sections reviewing work in public libraries, school libraries, and special libraries.  I recommend the section on special libraries, which has quite an emphasis on medical libraries, including references to past work regarding clinical impacts.

For those who are interested in approaches that libraries have taken to establishing their value, there is potential benefit in reading the entire report cover-to-cover.  For those who want a quick overview, these are sections that I recommend:

  • Executive Summary
  • Defining “Value”
  • Special Libraries

For more information about this report, see “A tool kit to help academic librarians demonstrate their value” from the 9/14/2010 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The full report is available at http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/.

The Critical Incident Technique and Service Evaluation

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

In their systematic review of clinical library (CL) service evaluation, Brettle et al. summarize evidence showing that CLs contribute to patient care through saving time and providing effective results.  Pointing out the wisdom of using evaluation measures that can be linked to organizational objectives, they advocate for using the Critical Incident Technique to collect data on specific outcomes and demonstrate where library contributions make a difference.  In the Critical Incident Technique, respondents are asked about an “individual case of specific and recent library use/information provision rather than library use in general.”  In addition, the authors point to Weightman, et al.’s suggested approaches for conducting a practical and valid study of library services:

  • Researchers are independet of the library service.
  • Respondents are anonymous.
  • Participants are selected either by random sample or by choosing all members of specific user groups.
  • Questions are developed with input from library users.
  • Questionnaires and interviews are both used.

Brettle, et al., “Evaluating clinical librarian services: a systematic review.”  Health Information and Libraries Journal, March 2010.  28(1):3-22.

Weightman, et al., “The value and impact of information provided through library services for patient care: developing guidance for best practice.”  Health Information and Libraries Journal, March 2009.  26(1):63-71.

Value of Academic Libraries: IMLS Grant and ACRL Project

Monday, July 12th, 2010

The Institute of Museum and Library Services has awarded a grant that will test and implement methodologies measuring the return on investment (ROI) in academic libraries. The goals are to provide evidence and a set of tested methodologies that academic libraries will be able to use in demonstrating their value. The University of Tenessee, Knoxville will be conducting this study in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Association of Research Libraries. Dr. Carol Tenopir, professor in the School of Information Sciences, is the project’s lead investigator. This news item from the UT Knoxville’s Tennessee Today provides more details: “UT Shares in Grant to Study Value of Academic Libraries.”

In a complementary project, the Association of College and Research Libraries has selected Dr. Megan Oakleaf to conduct a review of the “quantitative and qualitative literature, methodologies and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries.” The Association plans to issue a completed report later this year.

Hospital Libraries and IRS-Mandated Community Benefit: MLA Poster

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

A belated note about an interesting item at the Medical Library Association meeting in DC this past May. Christine Chastain-Warheit gave a fascinating 5-minute “Lightning Round” presentation, “Can Hospital Librarians Demonstrate Internal Revenue Service-mandated Community Benefit for Their Nonprofit Organizations? Reflecting on Value Provided and Connecting the Hospital Library to Community Benefit.” She pointed out that the IRS Community Benefit standard for not-for-profit hospitals includes activities that promote health in response to community needs. Community Benefit is the basis of the tax-exemption of not-for-profit hospitals. Her institution has agreed that the library’s outreach activities can be included in calculating hospital community benefit efforts for IRS reporting (Poster presented at Medical Library Association Annual Meeting, May 23, 2010). This approach could have good potential for libraries in not-for-profit hospitals demonstrating their value to their institutions and their institutions’ communities, so it’s definitely something to watch. Ms. Chastain-Warheit is Director of Medical Libraries at Christiana Hospital in Newark, DE.

ROI in MLA News

Thursday, November 20th, 2008

In the October, 2008 issue of the MLA News, Terrance Burton presented a quick overview of how the business, dollor-based Return on Investment approach (profit gained from invested dollars) can be expanded to a view of what value is derived from whatever inputs you choose to work with.  This can be more relevant in the library world, where profit is not the main point.  In fact, in many health-related institutions served by libraries, profit is not the main point.  Money is indeed invested in libraries, but it can be challenging to assess the outputs from that investment.  Burton suggests that we identify outcomes that we want to measure, use a mix of approaches (quantitative, qualitative, speculative), and accept that any measure will be flawed.  Despite flaws, using mixed approaches can provide various indicators to bolster a case.

Last updated on Saturday, 23 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract # HHS-N-276-2011-00008-C.