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Archive for February, 2014

Exhibit evaluations with QuickTapSurvey

Exhibiting is a popular strategy for health information resource promotion, but exhibits can be challenging events to evaluate. Survey platforms for tablets and mobile phones can make it a little bit easier to collect feedback at your booths. At the OERC, we have explored QuickTapSurvey, which seems well-suited to getting point-of-contact responses from visitors. The application allows you to create short, touch-screen questionnaires on Apple or Android tablets. You simply hand the tablet to visitors for their quick replies. The same questionnaire can be put on multiple tablets, so you and your colleagues can collect responses simultaneously during an exhibit.

When you have an Internet connection, responses are automatically uploaded into your online QuickTapSurvey account. When no connection is available, data are stored on the tablet and uploaded later. You can use QuickTapSurvey’s analytics to summarize responses with statistics and graphs.  You also can download the data into a spreadsheet to analyze in Excel.

QuickTapSurvey is a commercial product, but there is a limited free version. The application is fairly user friendly, but we recommend experimenting with it before you take it on the road. Information about QuickTapSurvey, including the different pricing packages that are available, can be found here: http://quicktapsurvey.com/

Evaluation Tip a Day

Do you want to know more about great assessment resources, tools, and lessons learned from others who share your interest in evaluation?

Do you not want to add another professional journal to the existing TBR (to be read) stack in your office?

Check out the American Evaluation Association (AEA) 365 blog at http://aea365.org where anyone (not only AEA members) can subscribe via email or really simple syndication (RSS) feed. The established blog guidelines place a cap on contributions with a maximum of 450 words per entry. You will know at a glance what the subject is (Hot Tips, Cool Tricks, Rad Resources, or Lessons Learned) from the headers used within the entries, and all assumptions of prior knowledge and experience with evaluation and organizations are avoided with clarification of all acronyms and no jargon allowed.

A handy tip – Scroll down the right sidebar of the website to locate subjects arranged by the AEA Topical Interest Groups (TIGs). Some of these that are likely to be of interest to National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) members are Data Visualization and Reporting, Disabilities and Other Vulnerable Populations, Health Evaluation, Integrating Technology into Evaluation, and Nonprofits and Foundations Evaluation to name only a few.

A brief review of a recent entry of interest to NN/LM members – Conducting a Health Needs Assessment of People With Disabilities –  shared lessons learned from the needs assessment work done in Massachusetts, and shared the rad resource of Disability and Health Data System (DHDS) with state-level disability health data available from the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC).

Interview tips: Talking with participants during a usability test

The Nielsen Norman Group (NNG) conducts research and publishes information about user experience with interfaces. NNG was an early critic of the troubled “healthcare.gov” web site: “Healthcare.gov’s Account Setup: 10 Broken Usability Guidelines.” recent post (“Talking with participants during a usability test”) provided tips for facilitating usability tests that could be very useful whenever you’re facilitating a discussion or conducting an observation. When in doubt about whether to speak to a participant, count to 10 and decide whether to say something. Consider using “Echo” or “Boomerang” or “Columbo” approaches:

  • Echo–repeat the last words or phrase, using an interrogatory tone.
  • Boomerang–formulate a nonthreatening question that “pushes” a user’s comment back and causes them to think of a response for you, such as “What would you do if you were on your own?”
  • Columbo–be smart but don’t act that way, as in the “Columbo” TV series from the 1960’s and 1970’s starring Peter Falk.

The full article “Talking with participants during a usability test” provides audio examples of these techniques that you can listen to. You can find a large amount of additional information about usability testing on the Nielsen Norman Group’s web site, such as “How to Conduct Usability Studies” and “Usability 101: Introduction to Usability.”

Cleaning Up Your Charts

So how are those New Year’s resolutions going?

Many of us like to start the year resolving to clean up some part of our lives. Our diet. Our spending habits. The five years of magazine subscriptions sitting by our recliner.

Here’s another suggestion: Resolve to clean up “chart junk” in the charts you add to PowerPoint presentations or written reports.

Now I can pack information into a bar chart with the best of them. But it is no longer in vogue to clutter charts with data labels, gridlines, and detailed legends. This is not just a fashion statement, either. Design experts point out that charts should make their point without the inclusion of a bunch of distracting details. If the main point of your chart is not visually obvious, you either have not designed it correctly or you are presenting a finding that is not particularly significant.

So the next time you create a chart, consider these suggestions:

  • Use your title to communicate the main point of the chart. Take a tip from newspaper headlines and make your title a complete sentence.
  • Don’t use three-dimensional displays. It interferes with people’s comprehension of charts.
  • Ditch the gridlines or make them faint so they don’t clutter the view.
  • Use contrast to make your point. Add a bright color to the bar or line that carries the main point and use gray or another faint color for the comparison bars or lines.
  • Be careful in picking colors. Use contrasting colors that are distinguishable to people with colorblindness. If your report is going to be printed, be sure the contrast still shows up when presented in black-and-white.
  • Consider not using data labels, or just label the bar or line associated with your main point.
  • Remove legends and apply legend labels inside the bars or at the end of lines.

For more comprehensive information on eliminating chart junk, check out this article:

Evergreen S, Mezner C. Design principles for data visualization in evaluation. In Azzam T, Evergreen S. (eds). Data visualization, part 2. New Directions in Evaluation. Winter 2013, 5-20.