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Archive for July, 2012

Need to Know – The 6D’s of Needs Assessment

At the OERC, we recommend using evaluation questions as a foundation for evaluation projects. The questions are useful in developing data collection methods, analyzing data, and organizing evaluation reports.  If you are planning a needs assessment, you can take advantage of a tip sheet that provides needs assessment questions for you: The 6Ds of Needs Assessments. This one-page document will help you identify the information needed to advocate for your project or design your program. The 6D’s of Needs Assessment was created by Kylie Hutchinson, principle evaluator for Community Solutions Planning and Evaluation.

 

How to Ignite Your Presentation: AEA Training Webinar

On July 27, 2012 Stephanie Evergreen, eLearning Initiatives Director for the American Evaluation Association, gave a half-hour webinar about the Ignite approach to giving presentations.  This approach involves a 5 minute presentation based on 20 slides that are each shown for 15 seconds.  (Yes, this is similar to Pecha Kucha.)  The American Evaluation Association, which is conducting a “Potent Presentations” initiative to help its members improve their reporting skills, has made the recording and slides for this great presentation available in its free AEA Public Library:

In her short, practical webinar, Stephanie demonstrated the Ignite approach with a great presentation about “Chart Junk Extraction”—valuable tips for creating streamlined, readable charts with maximized visual impact.  Spend an enjoyable and enlightening few minutes viewing the fast-paced and interesting “Light Your Ignite Training Webinar”—you can even learn how to set your PowerPoint timer to move forward automatically every 15 seconds so that you can practice your Igniting!

How to Analyze Qualitative Data

“Utilizing grounded theory to explore the information-seeking behavior of senior nursing students.” Duncan V; Holtslander, L.  J Med Lib Assoc 100(1) January 2012:20-27.

In this very practical article, the authors describe the steps they took to analyze qualitative data from written records that nursing students kept about their experiences with finding information in the CINAHL database.  They point out that, although the ideal way to gather data about student information seeking behavior would be via direct observation, that approach is not always practical.  Also, self-reporting via surveys and interviews may create bias because members of sample populations might “censor themselves instead of admitting an information need.”  For this study, students were asked to document their search process using an electronic template that included “prompts such as resource consulted, reason for choice, terms searched, outcome, comments, and sources consulted (people).”

After reviewing these searching journals, the authors followed up with interviews.

The “Data analysis and interpretation” section of this article provides a clear, concise description of the grounded theory approach to analyzing qualitative data using initial, focused, and theoretical coding using the nVivo 8 software.  [Note, as of this writing, the latest version is nVivo 10]

  • Initial codes:  “participants’ words were highlighted to create initial codes that reflected as closely as possible the participants’ own words.”
  • Focused codes:  “more directed, selective, and conceptual than word-by-word, line-by-line, and incident-by-incident coding.”
  • Theoretical codes:  focused codes were compared and contrasted “in order to develop the emerging theory of the information-seeking process.”

The authors reviewed the coding in follow-up interviews with participants to check the credibility of their findings:  “The central theme that united all categories and explained most of the variation among the data was ‘discovering vocabulary.’”  They recommend “teaching strategies to identify possible words and phrases to use” when searching for information.

You can do this even if you don’t have access to nVivo 8 software.  Here’s an illustration: “Summarize and Analyze Your Data” from the OERC’s Collecting and Analyzing Evaluation Data booklet.