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Archive for March, 2012

Evaluating Websites with Web Analytics: Contextual Use and Interpretation

If you missed the previous post in this series on “Evaluating Websites with Web Analytics,” you can find it here!

We left off in our discussion of web analytics by talking about a few of the basic metrics and how they can help libraries and non-profit organizations assess their websites and online presence.  The “big three” as described by the Digital Analytics Association included visits/sessions, unique visitors, and page views.  These three metrics are only the starting metrics that libraries and non-profit organizations can use to understand user patterns and actions, but other comprehensive metrics such as bounce rate, referral and direct traffic sources, traffic flow and conversion rate can give a better glimpse at how users are accessing your online resources.  In order to have the most comprehensive and “big picture” view of your website’s success and customer satisfaction, it’s important to use these web metrics with other kinds of evaluative tools, including logic models, surveys and formal usability studies (Marek, Chapter 4, 2011). Each metric should be evaluated within the context of other metrics and assessments, as web analytics contributes to the larger picture in understanding user patterns. Lastly, the organization’s mission and specific goals will determine how, when, and which web analytics should be used and interpreted.

At OERC, we use these comprehensive metrics to assess the OERC blog and website (separately), in addition to the big three.  Our web analytics tracking program is still fairly new and developing, but we wanted to share our process so you can see how easily web analytics can fit into the evaluation strategy of a non-profit organization or library.  Unlike for-profit companies, we aren’t using web metrics to calculate return on investment (ROI) and assign a monetary value to the metrics.  However, we can mimic some of those steps taken by for-profit companies to help guide our use of web metrics.

At OERC, we wanted to learn more about who accesses our blog & website and if they are finding the information they need. As Marek suggests, you need to evaluate your website through clear goals “based on your library’s mission and strategic plan” (Chapter 1, 2011).  From there, web analytics provides the raw data, which you can then assess within the context of your organization’s mission and strategic plan to make the most appropriate changes and informed decisions.  In web analytics, it is difficult to have exact and 100 percent accurate statistics, so capturing and evaluating trends over time is the best way to use web analytics as an assessment tool (Marek, Chapter 1, 2011). Web analytics can be a strong and valuable tool when creating evaluation tools such as logic models to guide your organization projects and outcomes. As you develop your short-term outcomes at the individual level, web analytics can be a quantitative way to measure your targets within your indicators.  This is where you can look at the patterns provided by bounce rate, traffic sources, referrals, and conversion rates to determine if you see a change and if your organization is achieving your logic model outcomes.  Unlike many evaluations, web analytics provide instant analysis and as a result, an organization can consult the data and make adjustments instantly to their website.  This flexibility allows you to reach your defined logic model outcomes and produce the best results from your structured plan.

At OERC, we determined specific goals to frame our web analytics strategy, and decided how we wanted web analytics fit into the overall structure of our evaluation plan.  Our overall goal is to increase blog post views and push more blog visitors to the OERC website and evaluation tools & resources. In our situation, we decided that we needed to track returning and new visitors as we publish new OERC blog posts. Then, we can compare those web statistics against baseline traffic patterns during days or weeks without a new blog post.  For the OERC blog, traffic sources and traffic flow are some of the biggest indicators of our visitors’ patterns. We can also separate new and returning visitors to the blog in different groups, and evaluation the traffic sources separately.  This way, we can work with our overall marketing plan to see if any marketing efforts have been successful in garnering new visitors, or pushing returning visitors back to the blog.

This step of web analytics complements other evaluation strategies because you can use web analytics to assess the same goals that other evaluation strategies are targeting.  For example, when an organization surveys users about how they obtain a particular form or brochure, then web analytics can provide supporting evidence for online users and downloads.  If the survey and web analytics show that more users are accessing the needed form online, then the organization can save costs on printing hard copies.  Furthermore, the organization can make a commitment to expand their online selection of forms and resources to support the greater interest in accessing forms online. Web analytics can support patterns from small assessments like surveys to see the full picture.   At OERC, we will be launching updated evaluation guides this year, and we will be tracking how often they are requested. Web analytics complements our in-person requests, and we will be tracking conversion rate to determine how often visitors download these new materials after visiting other webpages.  Conversion rate complements the other metrics and can provide support for our specified communication goals and logic model outcomes.  Another OERC organization goal is to increase requests for informational materials, as well as requests for classes and webinars.  As we market new materials and new online resources over the next few months, any increase in new visitors to specific OERC webpages as shown in the web analytics will complement our evaluation of these marketing techniques.  Web traffic to specific webpages or blog posts will complement the advertising efforts during webinars, social media outputs, and word-of-mouth.  In the next post for this series, we will take a closer look at the actual analysis of the web analytics and discuss what changes and patterns we see within OERC web analytics.

Web analytics provide valuable quantitative data that can support organizational goals and logic model outcomes. By integrating simple web metrics into your evaluation program, you can increase your understanding of website visitor patterns, website use, and access to online materials.  With this data, you can adjust current practices to improve your online presence.  Combining the data with results from other evaluations, such as surveys or focus groups can provide “big picture” statements, perfect for making larger decisions regarding future goals and actions.

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Evaluating Websites with Web Analytics

It comes as no surprise, but as of 2008, 61% of US adults and approximately 83% of internet users have used the internet to find health information. Relatedly, many medical libraries and health organizations rely on their websites, blogs, and social media to connect with their users or distribute much needed and requested health information. With more staff and time committed to maintaining social media and websites, how do we gauge the efficacy of these efforts? How do we know that our users are finding and accessing the information they need or want through our websites and other online tools? How do we know that users are actually following the breadcrumb trail from Twitter or Facebook to our website, and then navigating to relevant pages? Web analytics is the answer!

Web analytics is the study of the impact of a website on its users, and is a valuable tool to assess and evaluate your online presence. We often think of assessment and evaluation as something we do only in conjunction with a specific event or program. Simple website evaluation can be as easy as asking yourself a few fundamental questions. Yet, an ongoing assessment and evaluation of your web presence through web analytics is an easy way to understand what resources your users are accessing and how often they are visiting your site! There is a wide array of free and low-cost analytics tools that are now available across a multitude of platforms.  These tools have made it possible for non-profits to take advantage of these important statistics. In a 2008 study conducted in The Netherlands by Voorbij, the researcher found that most cultural heritage institutions use web statistics to assess the production output and costs of digitization activities. These nonprofits used a variety of web analytics programs, but all used the statistics for “practical purposes, such as adapting the web site or setting priorities for further digitization” (Voordbij, 2008). Web analytics programs make it easy to setup and track specific website or social media statistics through customizable features and follow what matters the most to your organization or library.

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