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Strategies for Improving Response Rate

There are articles about strategies to improve survey response rate with health professionals in the open access December, 2011 issue of Evaluation and the Health Professions.   Each explored variations on Dillman’s Tailored Design Method, also known as TDM (see this Issue Brief from the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Center for Mental Health Services Research for a summary of TDM).

Surveying Nurses: Identifying Strategies to Improve Participation” by J. VanGeest and T.P. Johnson (Evaluation and the Health Professions, 34(4):487-511)

The authors conducted a systematic review of efforts to improve response rates to nurse surveys, and found that small financial incentives were effective and nonmonetary incentives were not effective.  They also found that postal and telephone surveys were more successful than web-based approaches.

Surveying Ourselves:  Examining the Use of a Web-Based Approach for a Physician Survey” by K.A. Matteson; B.L. Anderson; S.B. Pinto; V. Lopes; J. Schulkin; and M.A. Clark (Eval Health Prof  34(4):448-463)

The authors distributed a survey via paper and the web to a national sample of obstetrician-gynecologists and found little systematic difference between responses using the two modes, except that university physicians were more likely to complete the web-based version than private practice physicians.  Data quality was also better for the web survey: fewer missing and inappropriate responses.  The authors speculate that university-based physicians may spend more time at computers than do private physicians.  However, given that response rate was good for both groups, the authors conclude that using web-based surveys is appropriate for physician populations and suggest controlling for practice type.

Effects of Incentives and Prenotification on Response Rates and Costs in a National Web Survey of Physicians” by J. Dykema; J. Stevenson; B. Day; S.L. Sellers; and V.L. Bonham (Eval Health Prof 34(4):434-447, 2011)

The authors found that response rates were highest in groups that were entered into a $50 or $100 lottery and that a prenotification letter containing a $2 preincentive.  They also found that use of postal prenotification letters increased response rates (even though the small token $2 had no additional effect and was not cost-effective).  The authors conclude that larger promised incentives are more effective than nominal preincentives.

A Randomized Trial of the Impact of Survey Design Characteristics on Response Rates among Nursing Home Providers” by M. Clark et al. (Eval Health Prof 34(4):464-486.

This article describes an experiment in maximizing participation by both the Director of Nursing and the Administrator of long-term care facilities.  One of the variables was incentive structure, in which the amount of incentive increased if both participated, and decreased if only one participated.  The authors found that there were no differences in the likelihood of both respondents participating by mode, questionnaire length, or incentive structure.

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