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Library Assessment Conference Wrap-Up

The penultimate session of the 2008 Library Assessment Conference was a panel discussion, Assessment Plans: Four Case Studies. Among the experiences and advice provided by the four expert panelists was this final observation about working with library staff on assessment projects: “If you include them, they’re your partner. If you exclude them, they’re your judge.”

The final session of the Library Assessment Conference featured a panel from academic librarianship and LIS education, who provided brief summations of what they learned during the three days of the conference.

Deborah Carver, Dean of Libraries, University of Oregon Libraries
There is more to the assessment story than numbers: Narratives are very important. Assessment is local, so think about what matters most to your institution. Borrow from others and share, but customize your methods for your own environment. Also, use what you have (ie, data you’re already collecting) as much as possible.

Debra Gilchrist, Dean, Libraries and Media Services, Pierce College Library
Inquiry is central to learning. Accountability is local and assessment provides vital signs. Stay ahead of the game so you can influence the future–as Betsy Wilson says, accelerate relevance. Can we call assessment something else? Focusing on assessment is like focusing on the test instead of the content of a class. We should come up with some label that puts focus on the outcomes. We should also do more with linking library assessment findings to what research says is important (eg about student learning).

Paul Beavers, Director, Information Services Group, Wayne State University Libraries
Assessment provides information that we can use in communicating with our patrons so that they can make more demands on us. We can help them understand that they can ask us to do more; we must make sure they have high expectations of us. Assessing the library’s contribution to educational outcomes is a “highest-hanging fruit” for academic libraries.

Peter Hernon, Professor, Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science
Evaluation and assessment are different from each other. Program evaluation is collecting and using data to make improvements, while environmental assessment is taking a broad view of the world. LIS education is sadly lacking in preparing future library and information science professionals with research skills that they can use in evaluating library programs.

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