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OERC Blog

A Weblog from the NN/LM Outreach Evaluation Resource Center

Improve Your Presentations

Death by Presentation by Frits Ahlefeldt-Laurvig (CC BY-ND 2.0)  No changes.

Death by Presentation by Frits Ahlefeldt-Laurvig (CC BY-ND 2.0) No changes.

In a recent blog post, evaluator Stephanie Evergreen suggested that people no longer ask for power point slides at the end of a presentation (Stop Asking if the Slides are Available).  Her point is that the slides should support the speaker and be fairly useless on their own.  If the audience needs a reminder of what was said, the speaker should provide handouts, with main points and resources listed, as well as links to engaging dashboards and infographics.

In her blog post, Stephanie Evergreen has 10 points for improving your presentations.  You don’t like it when people read their slides? Her first point is to remove text from slides so the focus of the audience goes back to what the speaker is saying. A complementary point she makes is that the graphics on the slide be emotional to help the audience remember what the speaker is saying.

What makes Evergreen’s 10 points unique in the world of presentation advice is that many of them are about charts and graphs.  For example, her point, “Choose the right chart so that your results tell the best story,”  ties what some might see as dry charts into the story that your presentation is telling. Another one, “Keep it easy to interpret your graphs with close data labels and a descriptive subtitle,” is a suggestion that re-occurs in her blog and book, Presenting Data Effectively: Communicating Your Findings for Maximum Impact.  For a detailed checklist of how to make a better graph, take a look at her Data Visualization Checklist.

The OERC Expanding Its Limits at MLA ‘15

The OERC will do its part in keeping Austin weird this week at the 2015 Medical Library Association conference.  If you happen to be around, stop by our presentations on Sunday (5/17) afternoon and say hi.

First up, Cindy Olney and other members of the !VIVA! Peer Tutor Project Team the will be exhibiting their poster:

Collaboration without Limits: A High School Student Intern and Health Care Providers Band Together for Patient Health Literacy (#49)
Austin Convention Center, Level One, Exhibit Hall 4
2:00 – 2:55 pm

South Texas ISD librarians Sara Reibman (who designed the poster), Lucy Hansen, and Ann Vickman also will be at the poster session. They have been training high school students to use and promote MedlinePlus and other health information resources since the !VIVA! Peer Tutor Project started in 2002. This poster describes a health information outreach project conducted by STISD high school student Yawar Ali and featured in a previous OERC blog post. We are hoping that Yawar will be joining us via Skype.

Karen Vargas will be presenting the following paper later on Sunday afternoon:

Boot up Your Lifelong Learning: Community Colleges and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Outreach Initiative
Austin Convention Center, Level Four, Ballroom E.
5:05-5:20 pm

Her co-presenters are Lisa Huang from Collin College (McKinney, TX) and Michelle Malizia, University of Houston. The panel will describe how one community college pushed the limits and collaborated with its regional medical library to offer educational opportunities in support of the Five-Year NN/LM Community College Outreach Initiative.

For our colleagues who are also attending MLA ‘15, we hope to see you there!

Billboard with postcard of Austin

Low Cost Mapping Tools on NLM’s Community Health Maps Blog

Map of Childhood Lead Poisoining Risk in Philadelphia, PA from CDC Map Gallery

Have you ever wanted to be able to use mapping for your outreach needs, but thought that making maps would be too expensive, time-consuming, or just too difficult?   The National Library of Medicine has a blog called Community Health Maps: Information on Low Cost Mapping Tools for Community-based Organizations, with the goal of facilitating the use of geographic information system (GIS) mapping by providing information about low cost mapping tools, software reviews, best practices, and the experiences of those who have successfully implemented a mapping workflow as part of their work.  The blog is moderated by Kurt Menke, a certified GIS professional.

Here are some examples of the kinds of things you can find on the Community Health Maps blog:

  • A short guide for using iForm for field data collection. iForm is an app that can be used on iPads, iPhones and Android devices, and has a free version.  Using this app, you could go to different locations, gather data (for example, demographic information about attendance at your program), and view it in tabular or map format.
  • A description of a project using youth in the Philippines to collect data on the needs of their communities.  Technology + Youth = Change showed how a dozen donated phones helped 30 young adults survey and map information on access to water, electricity, jobs, and more.
  • A review of a pilot project done by the Seattle Indian Health Board’s Urban Indian Health Institute on noise pollution and health in the urban environment. One of the goals of the pilot project was to determine whether this kind of data collection and analysis would be feasible with other urban Indian health organizations, so they selected participants who had limited experience with data collection and GIS. The feedback suggested that the GIS software tools were very user-friendly and effective.

Photo credit: Childhood Lead Poisoning Risk Analysis, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from the CDC Map Gallery

Guerrilla Assessment Methods

Recently, the Association of Research Libraries email discussion list had an enthusiastic discussion about guerrilla assessment techniques. These are low-cost, unconventional data collection methods that gather timely responses from library users. I thought I would share some of the favored methods from this discussion.

Graffiti walls seemed to be the most popular guerrilla method discussed in this group. Users were invited to write responses to one question on white boards or flip charts; or they were asked to write comments on sticky notes and post them to bulletin boards. Questions might be related, for example, to library space use or new furniture choices, or users might write suggestions for new resources. Pictured below is a colorful example of a graffiti wall from Clemson University’s Cooper Library posted by Peggy Tyler. Flip charts also were featured in this space use assessment conducted at University of Pittsburgh University Library System (see the FlipChart Analysis and the Flipchart Survey—Our Response presentations).

Short questionnaires to collect on-the-spot responses from users were also mentioned frequently. Some libraries placed laptops in conspicuous parts of the library to capture responses. Others took advantage of tablets, such as this project conducted at Georgia State University. Sometimes the low-tech approach worked best, featuring paper-and-pencil questionnaires or note cards for written comments.

Photographs also were used creatively to capture helpful assessment information. University of Pittsburgh University Library System staff used photographs to examine use of study space. With so many library users carrying mobile phones with cameras, there is a lot of potential for inviting users to incorporate photographs into their responses to assessment questions. In the ARL-assess discussion, Holt Zaugg at Brigham Young’s Harold B. Lee Library described a study in which student volunteers took pictures of places on campus that they thought fit a certain characteristic (e.g. too noisy, busy place to study).  The staff did follow-up interviews with the student volunteers for added insight about their photographs.

Guerrilla methods may look easy, but they do require careful planning and thought. You’ll need well-crafted, focused questions. You also will need an effective promotional strategy to attract user participation. And you’ll want a well-executed schedule for collecting and inputting data so that key information is not lost. Yet these guerrilla methods are worth the challenge, because they engage both participants and staff in the assessment process.  These methods are a refreshing alternative to conventional methods.

Graffitti Wall at Cooper Library at Clemson
Graffitti Wall at Cooper Library at Clemson

 

 

Infographics Basics: A Picture is Worth 1000 Data Points

Open Access Week at University of Cape Town infographicYou’ve been collecting great data for your library, and now you have to figure out how to use it to convince someone of something, for example how great your library is. Part of the trick is turning that data into a presentation that your stakeholders understand – especially if you are not there to explain it.  Infographics are images that make data easy to understand in a way that gets your message across.

It turns out it doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive to create your own infographics.  Last week I went to a hands-on workshop at the Texas Library Association called “Infographics: One Picture is  Worth 1,000 Data Points,” taught by Leslie Barrett, Education Specialist from the Education Service Center Region 13 in Austin, TX. Using this website as her interactive “handout” http://r13hybrarian.weebly.com/infographicstla.html, Leslie walked us through the process of creating an infographic (and as a byproduct of this great class, she also demonstrated a number of free instructional resources, such as Weebly, Padlet, and Thinglink).

Starting at the top of the page, click on anything with a hyperlink.  You will find a video as well as other “infographics of infographics”  which demonstrate how and why infographics can be used.  There are also a variety of examples to evaluate as part of the learning process.

Finally, there is information on the design process and resources that make infographics fairly easy to create.  These resources, such as Piktochart and Easelly, have free subscriptions for simple graphics and experimenting.

Leslie Barrett allowed us to share this website with you, so feel free to get started making your own infographics!

Image credit: Open Access Week at University of Cape Town by Shihaam Donnelly / CC BY SA 3.0

Keep It Simple with Micro-Surveys

A hot trend in marketing research is the micro-survey. Also known as the bite-sized survey, these questionnaires are short (about three questions) with the goal of collecting focused feedback to guide specific action.

The micro-survey is a technique for overcoming what is arguably the biggest hurdle in survey assessment: Getting people to respond to your questionnaire. It is a technique that is particularly useful for populations where mobile technology use is on the rise, and where there is competition for everyone’s attention in any given moment.  If we expect our respondents to answer our questionnaires, we can’t saddle them with long, matrix-like questions or require them to flip through numerous web pages. We need to simplify, or we will lose respondents before they ever get to the submit button.

The trick to micro-surveys is to keep them short, but administer multiple questionnaires over time. You can break down a traditional membership or customer questionnaire into several micro-surveys and distribute them periodically. “Survey Doctor” Matthew Champagne gives evidence to the effectiveness of this technique in his blog post about bite-sized surveys. He provides an example of a project that boasted an 86% response rate.

Of course, the length of your survey is not the only factor contributing to response rate. You should strive to follow the Dillman method, which provides time-tested guidelines for administering surveys. (Here is one researcher’s description of how to use the Dillman method.) Also, take a look at Champagne’s Nine Principles of Embedded Assessment. His website has articles and YouTube videos on how to implement these principles.

If you want to try doing a micro-survey, check out the effective practices described in this blog article from the marketing research company Instantly.

 

Grid of sticky notes with notess: Simplify, Keep it Simple, Less is More, Spend Less, Unclutter, Become Minimalist

An Easier Way to Plan: Tearless Logic Models

Sample Logic Model

Are you apprehensive when someone says it’s time to do “outcome-based planning using a logic model?” The Wichita State University Community Psychology Practice and Research Collaborative, and the Community Psychology Doctoral Program in Wichita, KS, have come up with an easy way to do logic models. This is described in an article, “Tearless Logic Model,” in the Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice.

Their goal was to create a facilitated, non-intimidating logic model process that would be more likely to be used in planning.  This approach is designed to give community-based groups, faith-based organizations, smaller nonprofits and people with little experience in strategic planning greater impact when planning community projects.

Tearless Logic Model planning requires only flip charts, magic markers, blue painters’ tape and a safe space to work with a group.  Jargon is eliminated, and is replaced with simple terms that anyone can understand.  For example, instead of asking “what are the anticipated impacts,” a facilitator would ask, “if you really got it right, what would it look like in 10 or 20 years?”

The step by step process that anyone can use is found in their article http://www.gjcpp.org/en/tool.php?issue=7&tool=9 as well as links to a Prezi visual guide and the full PDF that includes a helpful template.

Ashlee D. Lien, Justin P. Greenleaf, Michael K. Lemke, Sharon M. Hakim, Nathan P. Swink, Rosemary Wright, Greg Meissen. Tearless Logic Model. Global Journal of Community Psychology Practice [Internet].  2011 Dec [cited 2015 Apr 10];2(2). Available from http://www.gjcpp.org/pdfs/2011-0010-tool.pdf

 

Story-Telling: The NTOTAP Community Health Advocate Project Showcase

Want to see how stories can raise the visibility of successful programs? Check out the project showcase of Community Health Advocate programs, created under the direction of the Native Telehealth Outreach and Technical Assistance Program (NTOTAP). NTOTAP, a program of the Centers for American Indian & Alaska Native Health, provides training on website design and social media marketing to Native health programs. The short videos, which are project slides with narrative by the community health advocates themselves, provide digital vignettes of community health advocacy activities and accomplishments.

I heard about the NTOTAP showcase from Spero Manson, PhD, Director of the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health. Dr. Manson was a keynote speaker at the Quint*Essential Conference in Denver last October. He incorporated one of the videos into his presentation. (See the video of Russell George under “Walleen Whitson.”) Dr. Manson’s use of one of the stories proves the versatility of digital story-telling. The audience heard, in a participant’s own words, how a community health program made a difference in his life.

In the field of evaluation, which emphasizes evaluation use, story methods are emerging as an important trend. Project stories seem to have greater reach to program stakeholders than traditional reporting formats. The NTOTAP showcase is a great example of digital project story-telling in action.

Logo for NTOTAPNTOTAP Willeen

Updated Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI)

Peer county mapsThe OERC is excited to get the word out about the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s newly updated and redesigned Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI).  The new CHSI 2015 represents the collaboration of public health partners in the public, non-profit and research communities, including the National Library of Medicine.

The OERC recommends the CHSI as a possible resource in the data gathering portion of planning outreach projects or needs assessments. CHSI 2015 is an interactive online tool that produces health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States. Each profile includes key indicators of health outcomes that describe the population health status of a county. What makes CHSI 2015 an important tool is that it includes comparisons to “peer counties” – groups of counties that are similar to each other based on 19 variables, including population size, percent high school graduates and household income.

CHSI Summary Comparison ReportFor each county, CHSI 2015 provides a Summary Comparison Report.  Using Karen Vargas’ childhood home of Union County, PA as an example, this report (right) shows that in the case of the overall cancer death rate, Union County does better than most of its peer counties.  But in the case of stroke death rate, they do worse.

Distribution Display – bar chartsBy selecting a specific indicator, such as coronary heart disease death rate, the interactive CHSI 2015 will produce a bar chart showing Union County in comparison to its peer counties, as well as the US median and the Healthy People 2020 target (left).

More detailed, downloadable data for each peer county can also be found (below), as well as a web page detailing the sources of the data for each indicator. CHSI 2015 provides a helpful How to use CHSI web page that explains each feature and provides helpful hints.

Distribution data in a downloadable format

CHSI 2015 is designed to complement other available sources of community health indicators including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s County Health Rankings and Roadmaps.

Five reasons to attend the AEA Summer Institute 2015

Registration is now open for the American Evaluation Association’s annual Summer Evaluation Institute.  The Institute, held in Atlanta, runs for 2.5 days and features 26 half-day training sessions.   Here are five reasons I make a point of attending this Institute every year.

  • Great instructors. The training is offered by some of the most experienced evaluators in the field.
  • A continuing education bargain. Training costs about $80-90 per half-day session, less for students.
  • CDC presence. Historically, AEA co-sponsored this annual event with Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  While the CDC no longer co-sponsors the Institute, you will meet lots of CDC staff members and consultants.
  • Networking opportunities. Between lunch and breaks, you get eight opportunities to chat with your colleagues.
  • Great location. The Institute is held at the Crown Plaza Atlanta Perimeter at Ravinia, located in a park-like setting on Atlanta’s perimeter near shopping and restaurants. The hotel is on the MARTA (mass transit) red line, so you can get from the airport to the hotel without facing Atlanta’s legendary traffic. Because I live near Atlanta, I haven’t stayed in the hotel; but I’ve never heard any complaints.

Full-day pre-Institute workshops are held, for an additional charge, on the Sunday before the Institute. You can attend pre-conference sessions without registering for the Institute itself.  For example, beginners might want to take “Introduction to Evaluation” taught by Tom Chapel, the Chief Evaluation Officer at the CDC. Chapel organizes the workshop around the CDC’s six-step framework for program evaluation.

The AEA Institute 2015 runs June 1-3, with pre-session workshops conducted on May 31. The cost for the Institute is $395 for members and $480 for nonmembers, with a special student rate of $250. The price covers five training sessions (your choice among the 26 offerings), snacks, and lunch.  Pre-Institute workshops are an additional $150 (all participants).

AEA Summer Institute Home Page

Last updated on Saturday, 23 November, 2013

Funded by the National Library of Medicine under contract # HHS-N-276-2011-00008-C.