A wider-angle lens

Particularly at this time of year, when we are watching hurricanes and tropical storms heading for Puerto Rico and the southesastern Atlantic coast of the continental U.S., we tend to focus on natural disaster events and their consequences that occur here in the U.S., but it can improve our perspective to widen our view occasionally and look out at what is happening globally.

Thanks to Cara Breeden, who posts weekly about publications and resources available to assist with emergency preparedness and response on the DIMRC listserv, I arrived at an excellent tool for achieving this wider view in a report published by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disaster (CRED), entitled “Annual Disaster Statistical Review 2009:  the numbers and trends.”   The report is well written, and also nicely augmented with charts that tell the stories visually.  See especially pages 12 and 13 for charts that show a telling overview of worldwide natural disasters in 2009, and especially see the “Thematic Frames,” one on storms in Europe and Asia (p. 15) and one on earthquakes (p. 21).  Both of these special topics emphasize how important preparation has been for these events, from more early-warning systems to encouraging  better building practices in earthquake-prone areas, but also how much work remains to be done.  There is an excellent list of definitions of the types of disaster events near the end of the report; see Annex 1 on page 31.

While providing a wealth of detailed information, the report does, as its title says, show trends based on the data; the most important tool we have for making preparedness plans.

Pandemic planning schedule for libraries

We’ve added another resource to the Pandemic Planning page here on the Toolkit.  Check out the “Pandemic Planning Table“ (available in both Word and PDF on the Pandemic Planning Page) for a descriptive and sequential method for developing an effective service continuity plan in the event of a global pandemic, such as the one we are facing now from the Novel H1N1 virus.  The procedures shown in the table depict a schedule for pandemic preparedness.  The table is loosely based on one from the World Health Organization (WHO), but the description of the levels has been adapted to suit this particular pandemic.  While the WHO model is based on a virus that originates in animals (e.g. avian influenza), our model begins with a human-to-human novel virus.  The procedures detailed in the Table we’ve created should be easily adaptable to just about any type of library.  We welcome your comments and suggestions–what do you think?