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Archive for the ‘Preparedness’ Category

A Call to Action

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Last night I looked up and watched as four strangers applied splints to my arm and leg.  Another stranger applied pressure to my carotid artery to stem the bleeding.  They worked quickly and watched constantly for any changes in my condition.  I felt no pain throughout the process, as I was the volunteer victim during the final hands-on session of my eight-week CERT training course.  (CERT stands for Community Emergency Response Team, a component of Citizens Corps, which is administered by FEMA.  In the United States, there are over 1,100 community CERT programs.)  My “victim” experience gave me a deep appreciation of the value of citizen volunteer groups, as they are likely the ones to provide initial treatment in the event of large-scale casualty situation.

Librarians can bring many skills to the emergency planning community.  In CERT alone, there is a great need for database managers, newsletter writers, web page maintainers, social media specialists, and information providers at call centers.  I am a member of the Info Team, a group of volunteers that takes non-emergency calls whenever the EOC (Emergency Operations Center) has been activated.  An example of the type of call the Info Team would receive is someone asking about the availability of pharmacies following a disaster.  I’ve also volunteered to provide assistance with social media, such as Twitter.

I highly encourage all librarians to explore ways to take part in emergency preparedness and response activities in their communities or institution.  Go to the Citizen Corps website (URL: http://www.citizencorps.gov/) and do a zip code search in the box labeled Find Your Local Council to find contact information for area Citizen Corps organizations.  In addition, you can find other volunteer groups by going to the National Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (URL: http://www.nvoad.org/states#sevend) and searching the Membership tab for your state.  Finally, if you want a higher level of training on providing access to information for emergency preparedness and response, check out the Disaster Information Specialization Program offered by the Medical Library Association and the National Library of Medicine (URL: http://www.mlanet.org/education/dis/).

Libraries and librarians are playing a greater role in emergency preparedness and response throughout our nation.  Emergency planners are recognizing our value and are working librarians and libraries into their planning strategies.  There is a place for each of us somewhere in those strategies.  All it takes is some time and commitment.  The rewards are immeasurable.

 

Planning For the Next Service Disruption

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012


Click on this URL (http://nnlm.gov/ep/disaster-plan-templates/) and then click on the link to the Service Continuity PReP above the photograph.  It will download in Word format to facilitate customization.

Highest State of Readiness

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

Here are the elements that would be in place at a library that exhibits the highest state of readiness.  The list is based on our experience along with information we provide in our training program.  It’s likely that very few libraries, if any, have achieved this state, but it provides a bar for all of us to aim for.  As we move into the new year, we will be searching for and highlighting any library that has achieved this esteemed status.Comprehensive Disaster Plan updated at least once a year

  1. Comprehensive Disaster Plan updated at least once a year
  2. Response station that includes posted response procedures and ready access to tools (e.g., flashlights, first aid kit, bullhorn, plastic, battery operated radio, etc.) for handling an emergency
  3. One-page Service Continuity Pocket Response Plan (PReP) updated at least quarterly
  4. Shelter-in-place location
  5. Communication plan that incorporates redundancy of means of communication (such as what to do if cell phones don’t work) and procedures for updating  website, Facebook page, and/or Twitter
  6. Service continuity team
  7. At least one scheduled evacuation drill per year
  8. At least one table-top exercise per year
  9. Library and/or librarians integrated into parent institution’s disaster plan
  10. Core print textbooks/materials identified and labeled or shelved together
  11. Servers with core online resources on unlimited emergency power
  12. Mutual Aid Agreements with other libraries or networks for delivery of core services
  13. Prioritized recovery list of all valuable and hard to replace materials
  14. Partnership (contract not required) with commercial salvage and recovery company (e.g., Belfor, BMS, Munters)
  15. 72-hour emergency kits at the homes of all members of service continuity team

New Feature: Virtual 10-Step Approach to Service Continuity Planning

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

We now have a virtual 10-Step program!  The program, under 16 minutes, is broken down into an introduction and 10 individual steps, so it can be worked on as time permits.  In between some of the steps are assignments that, when completed, will greatly improve the readiness capabilities of your library.  Please feel free to offer your comments or suggestions.

Click on this URL and then look below the photographs: http://nnlm.gov/ep/10-stepsservice-continuity/.

For a taste of the program, here is the Introduction: