Emergency Access Initiative Activated

An important announcement from the National Library of Medicine:

The National Library of Medicine announces the activation of the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami.   The Emergency Access Initiative is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text articles from over 230 biomedical serial titles and over 65 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters.

The Emergency Access Initiative serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users.  It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster.

EAI is not an open access collection – it is only intended for those affected by the disaster or assisting the affected population.  If your library is working with a library or organization involved in relief efforts in Japan, please let them know of this service.

Emergency Access Initiative:  http://eai.nlm.nih.gov

NLM thanks the participating publishers for their generous support of this initiative:  American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, ASM Press, B.C. Decker, BMJ, EBSCOHost, Elsevier, FA Davis, Mary Ann Liebert, Massachusetts Medical Society, McGraw-Hill, Merck Publishing, Oxford University Press, People’s Medical Publishing House, Springer, University of Chicago Press, Wiley, and Wolters Kluwer.

 

Seismology of the Christchurch Quakes

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has provided us with some interesting observations about why the February 2011 earthquake in the Christchurch, New Zealand area did so much more damage that the one that occurred in September 2010.  Check out their satellite image showing the varying severity levels of the quake as well as their explanation about how time of day and location are often even more powerful factors in resulting damage than the severity on the Richter scale–visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=49586&src=eorss-nh.  Note that in addition to the shaking and movement of the earth, in these quakes, there is also “liquefaction” of the soil when groundwater and earth are forced together, which creates yet another kind of impact on the surrounding areas.

Earthquakes

Just after 11pm on February 27th, a 4.7-magnitude earthquake struck central Arkansas, serving as a reminder that earthquakes can happen east of the Rockies.  Below is a magnitude scale chart that I found at a Michigan Tech site (http://www.geo.mtu.edu/UPSeis/magnitude.html).  You can use the chart to see the difference between the Arkansas earthquake and the 6.3-magnitude earthquake that hit Christchurch, New Zealand last week.  (A 7.1-magnitude earthquake also struck Christchurch on September 4th.)  When was the last earthquake in your state?  To find out, click on the following URL from the United States Geological Society: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqarchives/last_event/states/.

Magnitude Earthquake Effects Estimated Number
Each Year
2.5 or less Usually not felt, but can be recorded by seismograph. 900,000
2.5 to 5.4 Often felt, but only causes minor damage. 30,000
5.5 to 6.0 Slight damage to buildings and other structures. 500
6.1 to 6.9 May cause a lot of damage in very populated areas. 100
7.0 to 7.9 Major earthquake. Serious damage. 20
8.0 or greater Great earthquake. Can totally destroy communities near the epicenter. One every 5 to 10 years

 

Christchurch Earthquake

We have been following events in Christchurch, New Zealand, since a 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit the city back on September 4th.  The library at the University of Canterbury was damaged by the quake and was scheduled to re-open this month.  Sadly, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the city yesterday and there are fatalities.  Here’s a link to an article about the earthquake from the Christian Science Monitor: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2011/0222/New-Zealand-earthquake-Authorities-scramble-after-temblor-leaves-at-least-65-dead.  You can also follow news reports and personal accounts on Twitter by searching #christchurch.

Earthquake Tour

We usually think of California when we think earthquakes in the U.S., but one of the most significant earthquakes to strike in North America actually happened in the New Madrid Seismic Zone two hundred years ago. Check out this site http://www.newmadrid2011.org/ to see information about the “Earthquake Tour,” commemorating the bicentennial of the New Madrid quake in 1811.  The tour begins tomorrow (Feb. 4, 2011) and continues on through this year with sessions in Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, and the other states adjacent to the New Madrid fault.  Be sure to explore the “Quick Links” section, especially the wonderful “Great Central U.S. Shakeout” site at http://shakeout.org/centralus/.   The Central United States Earthquake Consortium (CUSEC) site at http://www.cusec.org/ is also a rich resource for increasing awareness and knowledge about earthquakes and for advice about how to be prepared and stay safe in an earthquake.

Update: Central Library @ University of Canterbury

On September 4, 2010, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck near Christchurch, New Zealand, resulting in considerable damage to the area. One building that was severely impacted by the earthquake was the Central Library at the University of Canterbury. After months of renovation, the library is scheduled to fully open this month.

Click on this URL for pictures of the library after the earthquake: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/image.cfm?c_id=1&gal_cid=1502728&gallery_id=113731#7076979

Click on this URL for an FAQ on the status of the Central Library: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/earthquake/FAQ.shtml