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British Medical Journal Spotlights Patient-Centered Care

The British Medical Journal recently spotlighted patient-centered care with articles on how doctors and patients can work collaboratively to improve the way healthcare is designed and delivered so that it better meets the needs and priorities of patients: http://bmj.co/1Lj3oeb.  One featured article, “From Patient Centred to People Powered: Autonomy on the Rise,” is authored by Dave deBronkart, known as E-Patient Dave, discusses the progressive social movement to improve medical care: http://bmj.co/1zLLDCc.

Pre-Packaged Toddler Meals & Snack Foods an Issue with Salt and Sugar Content

The March 2015 issue of Pediatrics includes a study on the amount of sodium and sugar in complementary infant and toddler foods. Researchers examined the sodium and sugar content of 1,074 infant and toddler dinners, snacks, fruits, vegetables, dry cereals, juices and desserts.

Results: “Out of 79 infant mixed grains and fruits, 41 contained at least one added sugar, and 35 of these foods contained more than 35 percent calories from sugar. Seventy-two percent of toddler dinners were high in sodium, containing more than 210 mg consumed per meal. On average, dry fruit-based snacks contained 60 grams of sugar and 66 percent of calories from total sugars.”

They discovered the most commonly added sugars were:

Fruit juice concentrate (56 percent)

Sugar (33 percent)

Cane (20 percent)

Syrup (15 percent)

Malt (7 percent)

Sodium and Sugar in Complementary Infant and Toddler Foods Sold in the United States, to read more http://bit.ly/1vFBLF3

To learn more about your keeping your child healthy go to: http://bit.ly/1vFBX6Y

Study Finds Racial Disparities in Treating Type 1 Diabetes in Children

A new study “Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Management and Outcomes Among Children With Type 1 Diabetes,” in the March 2015 issue of Pediatrics (published online Feb. 16), found racial disparities in insulin treatment methods and diabetes outcomes remained even after adjusting for socioeconomic status. To read more on this study go to http://bit.ly/1BlP9Fw

Braille Tales Print Braille Book Program

American Printing House (APH) for the Blind and the Dollywood Foundation have an exciting partnership that expands Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library (DPIL) program http://bit.ly/1CIwP4O  by providing  young children who are blind and visually impaired with accessible books in print/braille and audio formats.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, a part of the Dollywood Foundation, partners with local sponsors in 1,300 communities in 3 countries to provide a quality, age appropriate book each month to preschool children enrolled in the program.

Print, Braille Books, Audio
APH/Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Partnership with the support of Penguin Group USA, offers a growing collection of audio files of Imagination Library books available as free downloads.  See the selected Imagination Library audio books for the month of February. http://bit.ly/1yX4NQM

Books are available free-of-charge in print/braille format. APH selects the titles from the current year’s DPIL booklist—those most appropriate for a child with a visual impairment.

Print/braille versions are mailed directly to the child’s family. When you enroll in the Braille Tales Print/Braille Book Program, your family can receive six free print/braille books each year until the child reaches his/her 6th birthday. There are eligibility requirements for the program. You or your child must meet the definition of blindness.
To learn more about the program visit http://bit.ly/1CIwP4O

Tools of the Trade: Putting Public Health Evidence in Action

On February 25, 2015, from 2-3pm EST, the National Cancer Institute will host a “cyber seminar” to introduce a new training program entitled Putting Public Health Evidence in Action in Health.

From NCI:

Putting Public Health Evidence in Action in Health is an interactive seven-module training curriculum developed by the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN).  CPCRN is a network of eight centers that receive funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute.  The training curriculum is intended for public health practitioners, state and local health department staff, health educators, healthcare providers, community advocates, academic/research faculty and staff, faith-based leaders, and other members of community-based organizations. ”

For more information and to register: http://1.usa.gov/1CAe0mM

Webinar: Youth Justice, Youth of Color and Health Policy Implications

From the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities:

“In this webinar, Burns Institute founder James Bell will discuss justice policy implementation trends with particular attention to their impact on the mental health and life outcomes for youth of color. The presentation will also include a review of national youth incarceration data and strategies that are used to assist jurisdictions in understanding disparities in their youth justice system.”

February 19, 2015 3-4pm EST

Register: http://bit.ly/1DxXK7g

Request for Information (RFI) Soliciting Input into the Deliberations of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) Working Group on the National Library of Medicine (NLM)

How has the work of the National Library of Medicine affected your work? Do you use resources such as MedlinePlus and PubMed? Has the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and BHIC provided information that is valuable to your practice? In anticipation of long-time NLM Director Donald Lindberg’s retirement, the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) Working Group on the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has put out a Request for Information.

Your comments can include but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Current NLM elements that are of the most, or least, value to the research community (including biomedical, clinical, behavioral, health services, public health, and historical researchers) and future capabilities that will be needed to support evolving scientific and technological activities and needs.
  • Current NLM elements that are of the most, or least, value to health professionals (e.g., those working in health care, emergency response, toxicology, environmental health, and public health) and future capabilities that will be needed to enable health professionals to integrate data and knowledge from biomedical research into effective practice.
  • Current NLM elements that are of most, or least, value to patients and the public (including students, teachers, and the media) and future capabilities that will be needed to ensure a trusted source for rapid dissemination of health knowledge into the public domain.
  • Current NLM elements that are of most, or least, value to other libraries, publishers, organizations, companies, and individuals who use NLM data, software tools, and systems in developing and providing value-added or complementary services and products and future capabilities that would facilitate the development of products and services that make use of NLM resources.
  • How NLM could be better positioned to help address the broader and growing challenges associated with:
  • Biomedical informatics, “big data”, and data science;
  • Electronic health records;
  • Digital publications; or
  • Other emerging challenges/elements warranting special consideration.

Responses are due March 13, 2015

For more information and to respond: http://1.usa.gov/1v5mbax

Reducing Non-Urgent Emergency Services

Reducing the use of emergency departments for non-urgent and often chronic conditions lowers healthcare spending and improves the care of patients, who often receive fragmented care, no case management and lack of followup. The Emergency Services Learning Community in Detroit, Michigan, with the support of the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, is taking steps toe address the challenge with innovations such as training paramedics to provide support to frequent 911 callers, implementing a referral system for community services, and using data to identify those needing services and connect them. http://1.usa.gov/17hUUr8

Mental Health Care and Assessment of Transgender Adults

Webinar: Tuesday, February 17, 2015, 2:00 PM ET. Research suggests that the number of transgender people seeking gender affirming surgical procedures is increasing, and this is accelerating in the U.S. with the lifting of insurance exclusions. Behavioral health providers are seeing more transgender patients seeking referrals to surgeons, and are seeking guidance on the standard practice with each patient. This free webinar, sponsored by the National LGBT Health Education Center, describes the role of the behavioral health care provider during a person’s transition and how to assess and advise patients. Register here: http://bit.ly/16TyTho

Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit

Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit updated: January 2015. The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has released a new edition of their Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit. The toolkit, available here,  http://1.usa.gov/16TsXoo, can help primary care practitioners with increasing the level of patient understanding of health information, followup instructions, medication directions and overall communication.