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Cultural Competency to Address Health Disparities

The National Partnership for Action and Regional Health Equity Councils (RHECs) developed information about cultural competency and its importance in addressing bias and achieving health equity.

The Southeastern Health Equity Council published a white paper entitled “Cultural Competency: What is it and Why is it Necessary?” as well as a “Cultural Competency Resource Guide.” Both publications can be downloaded from http://bit.ly/1T0Zj6F.

The Mid-Atlantic RHEC hosted a webinar on July 15, 2015 about “The Importance of Equity for All: How Cultural Competency and Unconscious Bias Influences Health and Quality of Life.” The recording is available on this page: http://bit.ly/1THiEJt

USDA Distance Learning & Telemedicine Grants

The USDA Rural Development opened applications for Distance Learning & Telemedicine Grants, http://1.usa.gov/1P9LRtm These grants can be used to purchase eligible capital assets, such as equipment or instructional programming, that aide in connecting teachers and medical service providers serving rural communities to other teachers, medical professionals, and experts too far to access otherwise.

An informational webinar about grants the will be held on February 18. View this flyer for instructions on how to register for the webinar: http://1.usa.gov/1Kt7E05

Alcohol Exposure During Pregnancy Affects Millions of Women in the United States

Adapted from CDC:

The CDC reports an estimated 3.3 million women are at risk of exposing their children to harmful effects related to alcohol use because they are drinking,  sexually active and fail to use birth control.  The age group of these women are between 15 and 44 years. Alcohol use before a woman knows she is pregnant, is known to cause irreversible damage to her child. For more information, please visit: 1.usa.gov/1nMXGwP

Vitals Signs Infographic: 1.usa.gov/1o6972H

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Adds Zika Travel Advisory to Four Countries

Adapted from CDC:

The CDC, in collaboration with public health officials, has added a Zika virus travel alert to the following countries: American Samoa, Costa Rica, Curacao, and Nicaragua. In addition, the CDC has provided a list of affected countries and regions combating the virus. 1.usa.gov/1PRWRsG  The Zika virus infection is most often spread by mosquitoes. For more information, please visit: 1.usa.gov/1QG7SAp

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Reports Increase in Birth Defect of Abdominal Wall

Adapted from CDC:

The CDC reports that a problematic birth defect of the abdominal wall called Gastroschsis, is worsening in the United States. In the past 18 years, reports of gastrochisis has doubled. Often, mothers under the age of 20 are affected. More troubling, non-Hispanic mothers saw the largest increase in percentage from 1995 to 2012. For more information, please visit: 1.usa.gov/20GCTcf

New Science iOS Games for Grades 5 to 12

sis_student_games_2016

There are three new interactive, educational apps from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services for students studying genetics, chemistry and environmental health science.

Bohr Thru: Use a 3-match game style to collect protons, neutrons, and electrons to create the first 18 elements on the periodic table. With the help of the main character, Atom, players become familiar with a variety of chemical elements and their structures.

Base Chase: Learn the bases of DNA with this fast-paced, educational app. Players grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA strands for a variety of animals. DeeNA, the game’s cartoon mascot, assists players in completing each of the required tasks.

Run4Green: The importance of environmental conservation is reinforced through this interactive game. Topics, such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energy and green product purchases are emphasized and rewarded throughout game play. The game is appropriate for students in grades 5-8.

Download these games on your iPhone, iPad and iPod touch by visiting the NLM app page at: http://apple.co/1nqG891

NREPP Priority Topics and Areas of Focus

Make Your Voice Heard on NREPP Priority Areas by January 29

From the Suicide Prevention Resource Center
You have an opportunity to help set priorities at Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). In addition to reviewing submitted programs, SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) will be conducting independent literature reviews to identify important substance abuse and mental health programs and treatments. NREPP has identified a list of topics, many of which are relevant to suicide prevention, and is asking the public to rate the priority of each area. Suicide prevention is not specifically listed, but you can suggest it (and other topics) by adding them in an open text field.

From SAMSHA
SAMHSA welcomes comments from community organizations, clinicians, practitioners, advocates, researchers, city, county and state agencies, and all other stakeholders regarding which topics they would like to see addressed in the new NREPP.

The deadline for feedback is January 29, 2016. To access the form, visit: http://1.usa.gov/1SMaiRp.

NREPP was developed to help the public learn more about evidence-based interventions that are available for implementation. If you would like more information on NREPP, please visit: http://1.usa.gov/1nqq2w5.

Women in Clinical Trials

Marsha Henderson, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Assistant Commissioner for Women’s Health, encourages women to talk about participating in clinical trials. In her recent blog post, http://1.usa.gov/23vXhPx, she discusses her own experience and why it’s important for women to talk about clinical trials and potential participation. She also refers to the Women in Clinical Trials initiative from the FDA Office of Women’s Health, http://1.usa.gov/1nAOYBT. The site offers answers to questions women may have about joining clinical trials. Both sites emphasize that anyone interested in participating in trials needs to consult with health care providers. To find a clinical trial or see the types of trials that have been done, visit ClinicalTrials.gov.

 

National Weather Service Winter Safety

This page is designed to teach you how to stay safe in a winter storm or in abnormally cold weather for your area. If you know what to do before, during, and after a winter event, you can increase your chances of survival. On this site, you will find information on winter alerts, science and hazards, as well as snow coverage maps and information describing the different types of winter storms as well as how to deal with extreme cold. You’ll also find a broad array of educational materials. http://1.usa.gov/1nKMbFP

Check out the weather preparedness events calendar. http://1.usa.gov/20pgY9l

‘Standing Desks’ in Classrooms May Kickstart Kids’ Activity

A new systematic review reports that use of “standing desks” at school helped kids get more active.

Experts noted that the review’s findings weren’t surprising, but said more research is needed to pinpoint actual health benefits to children from using standing desks.

The researchers also found that standing desk use was tentatively linked to better classroom behavior and greater energy expenditure among children, although the results were mixed — stemming from varied studies.

The systematic review was published online Jan. 22 in the journal Pediatrics.

Link to the abstract: http://1.usa.gov/1WKQIUA

SOURCES: Karl Minges, M.P.H., doctoral candidate, Yale School of Nursing, Orange, Conn.; David A. Paul, M.D., chair, department of pediatrics, Christiana Care Health System, Wilmington, Del.; James F. Sallis, Ph.D., professor, family medicine and public health, chief, division of behavioral medicine, and director, active living research, University of California, San Diego; February 2016, Pediatrics