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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. Get your outreach toolkit and be ready to promote this event with campaign materials and resources available courtesy of the Federal Occupational Health (FOH) Center for Health Communications. http://1.usa.gov/1fr3T6D

Take a Walk in a Park!

Monday, April 21st, 2014

April 19-27, 2014, is National Parks Week.  The National Park Service has partnered with doctors and healthcare organizations to promote outdoor recreation as part of a healthy lifestyle.

See examples of healthcare/National Park Service partnerships: http://1.usa.gov/QzIhyS

Find a national park near you: http://1.usa.gov/REW5t5

America’s PrepareAthon National Day of Action is April 30th!

Friday, April 18th, 2014

From America’s PrepareAthon:

America’s PrepareAthon! is a nationwide, community-based campaign for action to increase emergency preparedness and resilience through hazard-specific drills, group discussions and exercises conducted at the national level every fall and spring.

The first National Day of Action is scheduled for April 30, 2014 and will revolve around taking the actions to prepare for these four specific hazards:

  • Tornadoes
  • Wildfires
  • Floods
  • Hurricanes

For more information about how to participate, visit America’s PrepareAthon website: http://1.usa.gov/1qVd9H8

Recommended Reading: ‘Pollution is Segregated, Too’

Friday, April 18th, 2014

From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Recommended Reading page:

“After decades of studies demonstrating that poor people and minorities are more likely than their white counterparts to live near health hazards such as toxic waste sites, landfills and congested highways, a new study in the journal PLOS One took a more refined look at a particular aspect in the area of “environmental injustice”: exposure to nitrogen dioxide. The pollutant—which is produced by cars, construction equipment and industrial sources—is linked to higher risk of both asthma and heart attack.

Using data from the 2000 Census, researchers determined that minorities are on average exposed to 38 percent higher levels of outdoor nitrogen dioxide.”

For the complete recommended reading article as well as a link to the article itself, visit the RWJF’s Public Health blog: http://bit.ly/1jR5IxN

Incidence and Trends of Infection with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food

Friday, April 18th, 2014

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR):

Foodborne disease continues to be an important problem in the United States. Most illnesses are preventable. To evaluate progress toward prevention, the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network* (FoodNet) monitors the incidence of laboratory-confirmed infections caused by nine pathogens transmitted commonly through food in 10 U.S. sites, covering approximately 15% of the U.S. population. This report summarizes preliminary 2013 data and describes trends since 2006.

For the complete MMWR, visit the CDC MMWR page: http://1.usa.gov/1qV9qte

Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators: Progress Update

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

“The Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) are a select subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives chosen to communicate high-priority health issues and actions that can be taken to address them. There are 26 LHIs organized into 12 topics. On April 8, 2014, Healthy People 2020 unveiled a report highlighting the progress made within each of these LHIs through the first third of the decade.

There are 14 health indicators that have either been met or are improving in this first third of the decade, including:

  • Fewer adults smoking cigarettes
  • Fewer children exposed to secondhand smoke
  • More adults meeting physical activity targets
  • Fewer adolescents using alcohol or drugs”

Read the report: http://1.usa.gov/1n8SlfQ

New Perinatal Guidelines for Women with HIV

Friday, April 11th, 2014

From AIDSinfo:

“Key changes to the Recommendations for the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States are summarized below. Some content has been reorganized and revised to enhance usability. Text, appendices, and references have been updated to include new data and publications where relevant. The terms “mother-to-child transmission (MTCT)” and “prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT)” have been replaced with “perinatal transmission” and “prevention of perinatal transmission,” respectively. All changes are highlighted throughout the guidelines.”

To read more information and download guidelines visit AIDSinfo: http://1.usa.gov/1qnPLle

Free Tools to Track Your Child’s Developmental Health

Friday, April 11th, 2014

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

“We often think of height and weight, but from birth to age 5, your child should reach specific milestones in how he or she plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves. Not reaching a milestone in any of these areas could be a sign of a developmental problem, even autism. The good news is, the earlier it’s recognized the more you can do to help your child reach his or her full potential.”

For a list of tools and more information, visit the CDC page: http://1.usa.gov/1i8s2TK

A Look at How Research is Improving Public Health Laws

Friday, April 11th, 2014

In conjunction with National Public Health Week, Public Health Law Research (PHLR) has created graphics and images on the critical role of public health law when backed by evidence and research. These graphics show how effective public health law can change and save lives.

For more information and highlights from PHLR, visit the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Blog: http://bit.ly/1hyiwKI

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive! Campaign

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

As many as one in four children from birth to age 5 is at risk of developmental delay or behavioral challenges. To promote healthy development and early identification of these issues, several agencies within HHS (including SAMHSA) and the U.S. Department of Education have partnered to launch a public outreach campaign highlighting the importance of universal developmental and behavioral screening, and support for young children.

The campaign’s mission is to:

  • Promote universal screening.
  • Identify possible delays and behavioral issues in any child setting.
  • Enhance developmental supports for children.
  • Offer resources for professionals working with children.

These resources include screening tools, user guides for different audiences (including behavioral health providers), and an array of online resources for providers and parents.

http://1.usa.gov/1kOvwKc