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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Residents of Rural Areas Quality Measures Compared to Achievable Benchmarks

Friday, May 30th, 2014

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – Compares National Healthcare Quality Report quality measures for rural areas to achievable benchmarks. Identifies measures where rural areas achieved or exceeded the benchmark, were close to the benchmark, and far from the benchmark. Includes links to the data. http://1.usa.gov/SkDxOh

State Cancer Profiles

Friday, May 30th, 2014

National Cancer Institute – Provides access to state and county cancer statistics and trends, with data by demographic group and cancer type. Also covers screening and risk factors. Offers interactive mapping. http://1.usa.gov/1oSyTCK

Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke

Friday, May 30th, 2014

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – State and county maps and data on heart disease and stroke, with data available by demographic group. Also covers social and environmental determinants, availability of health services, and location of health care facilities. http://1.usa.gov/1kucRG9

WHO/UNICEF highlight need to further reduce gaps in access to improved drinking water and sanitation

Friday, May 9th, 2014

From the World Health Organization:

“Since 1990, almost 2 billion people globally have gained access to improved sanitation, and 2.3 billion have gained access to drinking-water from improved sources. Some 1.6 billion of these people have piped water connections in their homes or compounds, according to a new WHO/UNICEF report, entitled Progress on drinking water and sanitation: 2014 update, which also highlights a narrowing disparity in access to cleaner water and better sanitation between rural and urban areas.”

For the complete media briefing as well as highlights from the report, visit the WHO’s media page: http://bit.ly/QmqVF7

Inactivity Accounts for Greatest Risk of Heart Disease for Women

Friday, May 9th, 2014

From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Public Health Blog:

A new study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine finds that from the age of 30 onward, physical inactivity exerts a greater impact on a woman’s lifetime risk of developing heart disease than other risk factors, including being overweight, smoking and having high blood pressure.”

For more information, visit the RWJF post: http://bit.ly/1oxHqKy 

New CDC Homepage

Friday, May 9th, 2014

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has redesigned it’s homepage in response to user comments and request. The new homepage features responsive design so it will automatically resize to fit the type of device used to access it. In addition, the CDC has created a “CDC in Action” section, as well as a larger key feature section.

To see a complete list of new features visit the CDC features page: http://1.usa.gov/1j9XCwr

Webcast: Positive Youth Development For Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

May is Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month.  In observance, the Office of Adolescent Health is hosting a live webcast on positive youth development.  The webinar will focus on the research behind positive youth development, how community programs have been suing positive youth development and future interventions.

May 7, 2014 2:00 – 3:00 Eastern Time

Find more information about the Positive Youth Development for Teen Pregnancy Prevention Webinar online here: http://1.usa.gov/Sy6Wp2

Updated Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

The HHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents has announced the release of the updated Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents.

Key additions and revisions to the guidelines include:

  • Addition of “Cost Considerations and Antiretroviral Therapy,” a new section that discusses strategies to contain costs without compromising treatment effectiveness.
  • Changes to recommendations on the frequency of CD4 count monitoring, including a table that outlines the updated recommendations.
  • Change in classification of recommendations for initial treatment from “Preferred Regimens” to “Recommended Regimens” to reflect the expanding options for treatment-naive patients.
  • Increased emphasis on key principles to follow when switching ARV drugs in the setting of viral suppression.
  • A new table listing ARV drug options to consider when switching ARV drugs because of adverse effects.
  • For a complete preview of key updates to the guidelines, please see What’s New in the Guidelines. Additions and revisions are also highlighted in yellow throughout the text and tables of the PDF version of the guidelines.

Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents: http://1.usa.gov/Rbv6Eo

Vaccines on the Go app review

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

The Vaccines on the Go app is critical for accurate education of vaccinations

“The Vaccines on the Go App was developed by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). It was created to make finding accurate information about vaccines easier for parents.

The app was made to be a go-to source for any vaccination.

The app includes information about the actual vaccine, the diseases caused by not getting vaccinated, side effects of the vaccinations and any other information that parents may find useful.”

Read the rest of the review here: http://bit.ly/1uaej41

News from the CDC

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

The key findings from a series of CDC reports released online today by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) has found that American Indian and Alaska Native death rates are nearly 50 percent greater than those of non-Hispanic whites. http://1.usa.gov/1lGhm2E

“The authors reviewed trends from 1990 through 2009, and compared death rates between AI/AN people and non-Hispanic whites by geographic regions for a more recent time period (1999-2009).”

“The report concludes that patterns of mortality are strongly influenced by the high incidence of diabetes, smoking prevalence, problem drinking, and health-harming social determinants. Many of the observed excess deaths can be addressed through evidence-based public health interventions.”

For more information, the articles from the report will be in the AJPH “First Lookearly online section at 4:00 pm EST today, 4/23/2014.