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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

CDC Online Course for Violence Prevention

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Each year, more than 54,000 people lose their lives to violence. In addition to the tremendous physical and emotional toll, violence has substantial medical, lost productivity, and other costs. In 2000, these totaled more than $70 billion in the United States. The figure grows when we add criminal justice system costs, social services, and other expenses.

To help prevent violence, the CDC has released a free online training course, Principles of Prevention. The training teaches the key concepts of primary prevention, public health approach, and social-ecological model, and offers CDC approved continuing education credits. Participants complete interactive exercises to learn to help prevent five types of violence: child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, sexual violence, suicide, and youth violence.

Principles of Prevention: http://1.usa.gov/1xLqmni

With Child Migrants Set to Become Students, Educators Must Prepare

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

RAND Blog July 14, 2014

This blog post by Gabriella C. Gonzalez, Sociologist and Robert Bozick, Sociologist, offers insight on what may happen when the school year begins. http://bit.ly/1AbcZB1

Information on Immigration

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

From the American Psychological Association* (APA)

Psychologists Available to Discuss Immigration. Recent press release, July 11, 2014

As U.S. border crisis continues, experts can offer insight on mental health implications. http://bit.ly/1ry19wP

The APA is a good source  to find information on understanding the psychological needs of immigrants. This guide may be helpful, Psychology of Immigration 101. http://bit.ly/Uvglhc

Also view the 10 minute video: Undocumented Americans. In this video three undocumented youth who arrived as young children — Jong-Min, Pedro and Silvia — share their stories of how they are fighting hard to achieve their piece of the American dream.

*The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States.

Perception of Weight Status in U.S. Children and Adolescents Aged 8–15 Years, 2005–2012

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

NCHS National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief, Number 158, July 2014.

Key findings:

  • About 30% of children and adolescents aged 8–15 years in the United States misperceive their weight status. Weight status misperception is more common among boys (32.3%) than girls (28.0%).
  • About one-third of Mexican-American (34.0%) and non-Hispanic black (34.4%) children and adolescents misperceive their weight status compared with non-Hispanic white children and adolescents (27.7%).
  • Approximately 81% of overweight boys and 71% of overweight girls believe they are about the right weight.
  • Nearly 48% of obese boys and 36% of obese girls consider themselves to be about the right weight.

Sarafrazi N, Hughes JP, Borrud L, et al. Perception of weight status in U.S. children and adolescents aged 8–15 years, 2005–2012. NCHS data brief, no 158. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2014.

To read the full report go t0: http://1.usa.gov/1rcSs93

Who’s Leading the Leading Health Indicators Webinar on Substance Abuse

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Join HealthyPeople2020 and the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion for a free webinar on the importance of substance abuse prevention and the progress being made to address this issue. This webinar, which takes place July 24 at 11am Central, includes three presentations focusing on data, communication efforts, and effective implementation strategies. CME, CNE And CHES credit available.

To register and view the complete webinar information (including presenter bios), visit the webex registration page: http://bit.ly/1rnbw83 

Task Force Recommends New Education Programs

Friday, July 18th, 2014

From the Community Guide:

Can education programs impact students’ health later in life? Yes, says the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force), which released recommendations for high school completion programs and out-of-school-time academic programs to improve the health prospects of racial and ethnic minority students and students from low-income families. The Task Force based its findings, on systematic reviews of the scientific literature that are carried out with Task Force oversight, in collaboration with a wide range of government, academic, policy, and practice-based partners.

To see the complete information on findings and recommended programs, visit the Community Guide News page: http://bit.ly/1jY78du

2014 State Indicator Report on Physical Activity

Friday, July 18th, 2014

A new report from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity presents state-level information on physical activity behaviors and on environmental and policy supports for physical activity. The report contains a brief overview of data and statistics from the previous report, stories from the field, and a number of physical activity indicators.

To see the complete report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit the report page: http://1.usa.gov/1njvz5Q

Webinar: Health Literacy: Enhancing Access to Health Care for Justice-Involved Individuals

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Introducing NIC’s Health Reform and Public Safety Webinar Series . . .

Health Literacy: Enhancing Access to Health Care for Justice-Involved Individuals

July 22, 2014

10 -11:30am PT / 11 – 12:30pm MT/AZT/ 12pm – 1:30pm CT / 1pm -2:30pm ET

Target Audience: Criminal Justice Professionals, Corrections Health Professionals, Community-based Providers

Register at this link: http://bit.ly/1rhECpz

As mentioned in the NIC broadcast Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes on June 18, 2014, NIC is pleased to offer the first of several follow-up webinars that will delve further into health reform issues in criminal justice and corrections settings.

First up - Health Literacy: Enhancing Access to Health Care for Justice-Involved Individuals.

With the advent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, it is now possible for millions of low-income justice-involved individuals to obtain insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health care needs. This far- reaching systems change will impact every component of the criminal justice system from pretrial to reentry, from corrections health to behavioral health. Criminal Justice professional and Health professionals alike have a role in helping these individuals develop the capacity to obtain and understand basic health information to make appropriate health care decisions. In this one and half hour presentation you will hear from national correctional health care and health literacy experts. The content of this webinar will meet the following objectives:

Objectives:

1. Understand the health needs and incidence of chronic disease in the CJ population

2. Understand the importance of maintaining a continuum of care as inmates transition from jails to the community

3. Understand the barriers to access to care for this population, i.e., health literacy

4. Understand the role of criminal justice professionals, (corrections health, transition counselors, and probation/parole) in incorporating linkage to health care into case managements

5. Provide strategies for establishing linkages / maintaining continuum of care

Announcing the interactive Health Literate Care Model

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

From DHHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion:

 

Most Americans are challenged by the complexity of the health information they need to navigate the health care system and to stay healthy. We can begin to address this challenge by infusing health literacy throughout the health care system using the Health Literate Care Model. The Model provides health care organizations with a detailed framework and toolkit for integrating health literacy into the critical aspects of health care planning and operations.

NEW TOOL: http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S

The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) has just launched an interactive Health Literate Care Model graphic – a quick way to understand how to integrate health literacy strategies throughout health care organizations.

We encourage you to try out the interactive graphic – and share with your colleagues. Here is sample language for sharing with your networks.

-SAMPLE EMAIL-

Announcing the NEW Interactive Health Literate Care Model!

In order for health outcomes to improve, patients must be fully engaged in prevention, health decision-making, and self-management. The Health Literate Care Model weaves these and other health literacy strategies into the widely adopted Care Model, formerly the Chronic Care Model. The model calls for health care providers to:

·         approach all patients as if they are at risk of not understanding health information;

  •          employ a range of effective strategies for making all communication clear and actionable; and
  •          confirm patients’ understanding.

Use this interactive graphic to learn how to implement the Health Literate Care Model: http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S

 

 -SAMPLE TWEETS-

NEW! Interactive Health Literate Care Model teaches effective #healthlit concepts via clickable content. http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S

How can we adopt health literacy strategies within the health care system? Learn how: http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S #healthlit

NEW Tool! Try – and share – this interactive graphic to learn about the Health Literate Care Model. http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S #healthlit

-SAMPLE FACEBOOK POSTS-

How can we adopt effective health literacy strategies within the health care system? The Health Literate Care Model can help. Learn more with this interactive graphic, adapted from the original Chronic Care Model.

Link: http://1.usa.gov/1jQDO8S

New Publication: Indian Health Surveillance Report: Sexually Transmitted Disases, 2011

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

The Indian Health Service (IHS) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of STD Prevention are pleased to announce the publication of the most recent Indian Health Surveillance Report – Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2011.  This report presents statistics and trends for STDs among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States and for the 12 IHS Administrative Areas.

View the Indian Health Surveillance Report online: http://1.usa.gov/1p4iD0f