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Archive for the ‘Public Health’ Category

Improving Cultural Competence

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) has release a new publication, Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 59: Improving Cultural Competence.  This free resource will benefit you and your organization by assisting professional care providers and administrators in understanding the role of culture in the delivery of substance abuse and mental health services by enabling opportunities to discuss racial, ethnic, and cultural considerations and the core elements of cultural competence. To access this publication go to http://1.usa.gov/1JHVm3A

Teen Nutrition: Making Healthy Choices Easier

Monday, January 11th, 2016

This month’s Healthy You tipsheet from the American Public Health Association features advice on how to make healthy eating easier for teens. The tipsheet is available in English, Spanish, easy-to-read and audio versions.

Healthy You (APHA): http://bit.ly/UD9hur

2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Friday, January 8th, 2016

The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is designed to help Americans eat a healthier diet. Intended for policymakers and health professionals, this edition of the Dietary Guidelines outlines how people can improve their overall eating patterns — the complete combination of foods and drinks in their diet. This edition offers 5 overarching Guidelines and a number of Key Recommendations with specific nutritional targets and dietary limits: Following a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan; Focusing on variety, nutrient density, and amount; Limiting calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake; Shifting to healthier food and beverage choices; and Supporting healthy eating patterns for all.

2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: http://1.usa.gov/1mI5kba

E-cigarette Ads are Reaching Middle and High School Students

Friday, January 8th, 2016

About 7 in 10 middle and high school students – more than 18 million young people – see e-cigarette advertising in stores, online, in newspapers and magazines, or on television and in movies, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report. E-cigarette ads use many of the same themes – independence, rebellion and sex – used to sell cigarettes and other conventional tobacco products. Advertising of tobacco products has been shown to cause youth to start using those products. The unrestricted marketing of e-cigarettes and dramatic increases in their use by youth could reverse decades of progress in preventing tobacco use among youth. Efforts by states, communities, and others could reduce this exposure.

CDC E-cigarette Ads and Youth: http://1.usa.gov/1S8qJXT

The Relationship of Nearsightedness found in U.S. Children and Electronic Devices

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Adapted from article in Health Day (MedlinePlus):

In the article, More Computer Time May Be Causing Nearsightedness in U.S. Kids, the time allotted to electronic devices may be causing nearsightedness in children across the United States. Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, has doubled in the last 50 years according to ophthalmologists. Dr. David Hunter, chief of ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital explains, “Nearsightedness is when your eyes are capable of focusing up close but not far away. It generally happens when the eye grows too long, and the best focus point no longer aligns well with the area at the back of the eye called the retina.” Experts suspect the increase in Myopia rates found in children is because of the ongoing trend of many focusing on something near their eyes in artificial light and the lack of time spent outdoors in natural light. For more information, the article can be found here: http://1.usa.gov/1PKzbJi

 

The Importance of Heart Attack Symptoms and Early Treatment

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Adapted from article in Health Day (MedlinePlus):

In the article, Early Treatment Improves Heart Attack Outcomes, Study Finds, by Mary Elizabeth Dallas, the period to restore blood flow once a heart attack occurs is crucial to recovery and offsets long-term damage. Therefore, those who are alert to heart attack symptoms, often have better outcomes. The timeframe from heart attack symptoms to treatment is called “door-to-balloon” time.

The procedure to restore blood flow to the heart using a stent is called percutaneous coronary intervention. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association both state, “Treatment should be received in 90 minutes or less.”

In the study, 2,056 patient hospital records were examined and the results were published online Dec. 28 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The report found that patients who were treated longer than the recommend time frame of 90 minutes were less likely to have blood flood fully restored. Medical experts conclude that initial stages of door-to-balloon time and heart attack symptoms is crucial. For more information, the article can be found: http://1.usa.gov/1OvFrpo

Reminder: Toy Safety for Children

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Adapted from article in Health Day (MedlinePlus):

In the article, Make Toy Safety a Top Concern by Robert Preidt, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that 252,000 children were treated in emergency rooms for toy-related injuries last year. The commission reported that seventy percent of those children were 12 or younger. In an effort to reduce those numbers, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend parents to choose toy with caution and pay close attention to safety guidelines. For more information, the article can be found here: http://1.usa.gov/1PINpME

 

FDA Proposes New Safety Measures for Indoor Tanning Devices

Friday, December 18th, 2015

From the Food and Drug Administration:

“There are many risks from indoor tanning devices: Using sunlamp products such as indoor tanning beds or booths exposes you to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and increases your risk of eye injury, skin damage, and skin cancer—including melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer.

Due to these risks, the FDA already requires indoor tanning devices to be labeled with a visible, black-box warning stating that they should not be used by people under age 18. Now the FDA is proposing a rule to protect youth from the risks of these devices by restricting use only to adults age 18 and older. This proposed rule also would require indoor tanning facilities to inform adult users about the health risks of indoor tanning and to obtain a signed risk acknowledgement from these users.

The agency also is proposing a second rule that would require manufacturers and indoor tanning facilities to take more actions to help improve the overall safety of indoor tanning devices to protect adult consumers.

Read the Consumer Update to learn more about these proposed rules and how you can share your comments.”

Consumer Update: http://1.usa.gov/1RtUQIK

 

The National Resource Center on Advancing Emergency Preparedness for Culturally Diverse Communities

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

“Diversity Preparedness” is a web-based library of resources and information on disaster preparedness for culturally diverse communities and other at-risk populations. The planning tools, fact sheets, trainings, and other materials have been developed by academic centers, government agencies, and non-profit organizations in the United States. They were developed for public health, healthcare, emergency management, and social service providers who work with diverse and high-risk communities. http://bit.ly/1Jc13kU

HPV Vaccine: new handout from American Public Health Association

Monday, December 14th, 2015

The American Public Health Association has downloadable and shareable consumer health fact sheets in English and Spanish. The November/December 2015 topic is “HPV vaccine: A shot that can help protect your child from cancer”.

Read this and other fact sheets: http://bit.ly/UD9hur