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Archive for the ‘National Library of Medicine News’ Category

NLM Releases TOXinvaders, a Mobile Game about Chemistry, the Environment and Health

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

The Division of Specialized Information Services of the National Library of Medicine launches TOXinvaders, an environmental health and toxicology game for iPhone and iPad, available from the Apple Store.

TOXinvaders supports middle school science concepts pertaining to chemistry, environment and health. It can serve as an engaging classroom or homework activity for middle and high school students, as well as an entertaining learning activity for gaming aficionados of all ages. In the classroom environment, TOXinvaders works best as a supplement to NLM Tox Town, Environmental Health Student Portal, TOXMAP, and ChemIDplus Web sites.

The game consists of four fast-paced levels, in which a launcher is used to annihilate toxic chemicals falling from the sky and earn protective shield points by capturing “good chemicals.” To move on to the next level, players must take a brief quiz about the chemicals. These dynamically generated tests provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about environmental health and toxicology from the game’s chemical information sheet and from NLM Web sites.

Click here for the link to the Apple Store to download the app:



NIH Still Active in Gulf Region Five Years After Oil Spill

Monday, April 13th, 2015

From the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS):

“Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion, researchers at the National Institutes of Health are actively working with Gulf region community partners, to learn if any human health problems resulted from the disaster and establish a new research response plan to be better prepared for future disasters….

An important lesson learned from the Gulf oil spill and other recent disasters is that researchers need to be involved early in the response efforts to collect vital health information, including samples of air, water, and other materials and contaminants. They also need off-the-shelf customizable research tools if they are going to be able to move quickly to launch a research study that meets all guidelines for protecting the rights of study volunteers. As a result, NIEHS worked with the National Library of Medicine, also part of NIH, and other agencies to develop the NIH Disaster Research Response Project. Key elements of this project include publicly accessible field-tested data collection tools, research protocols, training materials and exercises, and development of a network of trained research responders (see”

For more information about NIH activities in the Gulf region:

New Edition of the Women of Color Health Data Book

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

The NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) is pleased to announce the publication of the Women of Color Health Data Book, 4th Edition.

The Women of Color Health Information Collection presents data on race/ethnicity and disease. Through data, clues about how culture, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, and geographic location contribute to the health status of women of color can be identified. In order to explore sex differences, scientists need data about the similarities and differences between women and men in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other conditions.

Data book:

Women of Color Health Collection:

Learn about the CDC’s Health Literacy Tools

Friday, March 20th, 2015

A few months ago, CDC redesigned its health literacy website to increase access to a number of tools and trainings. These solutions were designed to help you to produce accurate, accessible and actionable health information, whether you’re new to health literacy or a seasoned veteran.

John Parmer, Health Communication Specialist in the Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC) will lead a live tour of the website. John has helped to coordinate health literacy activities across the agency. In that role, he was involved in the launch of the Clear Communication Index as a research-based tool.

*   Two digital tours will be offered of and Clear Communication Widget in partnership with Appalachian Community Cancer Network, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region,  Heath Care Improvement Foundation and Regional Health Literacy Coalition.

*   Chose the time that best suits you. There will be two tours. The first is on Tuesday, March 24 at 10 am (EST) and the second is on Thursday, March 26 at 1:00 pm (EST).

Free registration for either time:

Anatomy of a Funding Opportunity Announcement

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Feature Article from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

If you find that getting through a FOA is a daunting task, it might help to familiarize yourself with the parts and sections of a FOA so you know what to expect and learn why each is important.  This “head to toe” look at FOAs helps make reading one more approachable.

Read the full article at the NIAID Funding News page.

For more information on FOAs, visit the National Library of Medicine Specialized Information Services Information Outreach Funding Opportunities page.

The Outreach and Special Populations Branch (OSPB) manages and develops programs to eliminate disparities in health information access by providing community outreach support, training health professionals on NLM’s health information databases, and designing websites that discuss the concerns of various racial and ethnic groups. These programs reach health professionals, public health workers and the general public, especially about health issues that disproportionately impact minorities such as environmental exposures and HIV/AIDS.

Request for Information (RFI) Soliciting Input into the Deliberations of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) Working Group on the National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Monday, February 16th, 2015

How has the work of the National Library of Medicine affected your work? Do you use resources such as MedlinePlus and PubMed? Has the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and BHIC provided information that is valuable to your practice? In anticipation of long-time NLM Director Donald Lindberg’s retirement, the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) Working Group on the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has put out a Request for Information.

Your comments can include but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Current NLM elements that are of the most, or least, value to the research community (including biomedical, clinical, behavioral, health services, public health, and historical researchers) and future capabilities that will be needed to support evolving scientific and technological activities and needs.
  • Current NLM elements that are of the most, or least, value to health professionals (e.g., those working in health care, emergency response, toxicology, environmental health, and public health) and future capabilities that will be needed to enable health professionals to integrate data and knowledge from biomedical research into effective practice.
  • Current NLM elements that are of most, or least, value to patients and the public (including students, teachers, and the media) and future capabilities that will be needed to ensure a trusted source for rapid dissemination of health knowledge into the public domain.
  • Current NLM elements that are of most, or least, value to other libraries, publishers, organizations, companies, and individuals who use NLM data, software tools, and systems in developing and providing value-added or complementary services and products and future capabilities that would facilitate the development of products and services that make use of NLM resources.
  • How NLM could be better positioned to help address the broader and growing challenges associated with:
  • Biomedical informatics, “big data”, and data science;
  • Electronic health records;
  • Digital publications; or
  • Other emerging challenges/elements warranting special consideration.

Responses are due March 13, 2015

For more information and to respond:

National Library of Medicine Announces Pill Image Recognition Request for Information

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Unidentified and misidentified prescription pills present challenges for individuals and professionals. Unidentified pills can be found by family members, health professionals, educators, and law enforcement. The nine out of 10 US citizens over age 65 who take more than one prescription pill can be prone to misidentifying those pills. This PIR RFI is a pilot for a forthcoming PIR Challenge whose goal is to develop smart phone apps that individuals can use to take pictures of prescription pills and then search for and retrieve pill images and associated data of likely matches in an NLM database. NLM anticipates that respondents will include professionals and students, individually or in teams, in computer vision and computer graphics working on content-based image retrieval.

The RFI for the PIR Pilot is at:

Instructions for responding to the RFI are at:

The deadline for submissions to this RFI is Monday, April 27, 2015.

Questions and comments are welcome at:

NLM Launches New Twitter Stream For K-12 Science Educators

Friday, February 6th, 2015

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) Specialized Information Services division works with teachers and scientific experts to provide FREE reliable resources to help introduce, reinforce, and supplement education programs.

The K-12 Science and Health Education Directory contains resources on topics including biology, environmental health science, chemistry, forensics and medical technology, genetics, HIV/AIDS, and more!

Additionally, a new NLM Twitter stream with resources for K-12 science educators can be found at: @NLM_K12.

K-12 Science and Health Education Directory:
@NLM_K12 Twitter:

TOXMAP Now Includes EPA Coal Plant Emissions Data

Friday, December 19th, 2014

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) TOXMAP new Flash-based beta now includes 2013 coal emissions data published by the US EPA Clean Air Markets program.
Data was obtained from the Air Markets Program Data (AMPD) tool, a publicly-available data system for searching and downloading data collected as part of EPA emissions trading programs. In 2013, about 2.1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions were attributable to electricity generated from coal.

For additional information, visit the NLM Technical Bulletin:

NLM: Genetics/Genomics Information subject guide

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

NLM released a new Genetics/Genomics Information subject guide  as the latest update in the NLM subject guide series. These guides, based on our most frequently asked questions, are starting points for health professionals, researchers, librarians, students, and others. Other published guides in our series are about finding:

Health Statistics –

Library Statistics –

Drug Information –

Conference proceedings, abstracts, papers, and posters –

We will develop more subject guides as needed.

We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions about all of our guides at: