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Archive for the ‘Multilingual’ Category

Webinar Series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Migrant Clinicians Network has designed the series *Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health* for new as well as seasoned clinicians who are interested in understanding more about the migrant population. The series is divided into six webinars which cover a wide breadth of knowledge and skills to help clinicians provide quality care to one of the most difficult to reach populations in the United States.

Each module is accredited for an hour of Continuing Nursing or Continuing Medical Education. If you enroll for the entire series you will receive 6 full hours of free continuing education.

For more information and to register, go to the Migrant Clinicians Network web site: http://bit.ly/1gyfAat

NHLBI Report: Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book

Friday, March 7th, 2014

A comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits. These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), led by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities. The full report is available in English and Spanish.

Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities (English and Spanish): http://1.usa.gov/1hTbu0J

APHA’s Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks

Friday, March 7th, 2014

How often should you refresh your emergency supplies? At least every six months, experts say. But with everything else that’s going on in life, remembering to do so can be hard. That’s why American Public Health Association’s (APHA’s) Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks campaign uses the twice-a-year clock change as a reminder. The campaign advises people to refresh their stockpile, such as their emergency food, water and batteries, when they adjust their clocks for daylight saving time. Every American should have at least a three-day supply of food and water in case of an emergency, including one gallon of water per person per day, according to preparedness experts. Other supplies that should be on hand include a first-aid kit, a can opener, flashlight, battery-operated radio and batteries.

Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks (English and Spanish): http://bit.ly/1f776LR

Get Covered During Latino Enrollment Week

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Over 3 million Americans have enrolled in affordable health coverage. Many have shared their own stories about what it means to them — peace of mind, better coverage, security to pursue their dreams, and more. There are five weeks left until open enrollment closes on March 31. Let’s keep the momentum going and help more Americans get enrolled.

Encourage coverage on the Health Insurance Marketplace, http://1.usa.gov/1cKYZ4d, during Latino Enrollment Week, February 24-28. The U.S. Health and Human Services website offers these resources: Starting the Conversation http://1.usa.gov/1k7Tza6; Six reasons to get covered: http://1.usa.gov/N0tOKG; Sharing Stories: http://1.usa.gov/1hQCKQT; and Inscríbase antes del 15 de marzo: https://www.cuidadodesalud.gov/es/.

Depression and Heart Disease

Monday, February 10th, 2014

From the National Institute of Mental Health:

“People with heart disease are more likely to suffer from depression than otherwise healthy people. Angina and heart attacks are closely linked with depression. Researchers are unsure exactly why this occurs. They do know that some symptoms of depression may reduce your overall physical and mental health, increasing your risk for heart disease or making symptoms of heart disease worse. Fatigue or feelings of worthlessness may cause you to ignore your medication plan and avoid treatment for heart disease. Having depression increases your risk of death after a heart attack.

Download the full brochure in English or Spanish: http://1.usa.gov/MFLWZX

 

Somali Refugee Women: Learn About Your Health!

Friday, February 7th, 2014

The Administration for Children & Families (ACF) and Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) has released a four-part video series, Somali Refugee Women: Learn About Your Health! The goal of the video series is to educate Somali women refugees about a variety of health issues that can affect – and possibly save – their lives, including reproductive health, diet and exercise, cancer screening, prenatal care and pregnancy, and other health topics. These videos were developed in collaboration with Somali women’s health experts, women’s health advocates, and Somali refugee community organizations.

Somali Refugee Women: Learn About Your Health! http://bit.ly/LEwZqb

HIV/AIDS Prevention Bilingual Glossary Widget

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

The HIV/AIDS Prevention Bilingual Glossary provides linguistic support to individuals and organizations working with Spanish-speaking populations in the United States. The terms included here are commonly used in public health and HIV/AIDS prevention in the U.S. You can:

  • Find Spanish equivalents for English words and English equivalents for Spanish words;
  • Rate the translations provided;
  • Use the tag cloud to find commonly searched terms; and
  • Comment on how we can improve the glossary.

You can place the widget in your website by copying the code and it will allow your users to search the glossary in English and Spanish. The widget is approximately 141 pixels wide by 141 pixels high.

Access the widget and the code on the Office of Minority Health’s website: http://1.usa.gov/1dOi5us

New Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have published new heart disease and stroke prevention guidelines, which encourage health professionals to treat obesity as a disease and to promote overall healthy diets to their patients.  From the American Heart Association, “[a]nd they give doctors the first-ever formulas to calculate heart and stroke risk specifically for African-Americans – who face disproportionate risks for these diseases.”

Overview of the guidelines: http://bit.ly/18xQKux

Read guidelines: http://bit.ly/1fZfaPM

Affordable Care Act Resources for Refugees

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Right now, many refugees get short-term health insurance called Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA). It is available for up to eight months. Some refugees may be eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) which is available for several years. Thanks to the health care law, the health insurance landscape for refugees and other Americans is changing for the better in 2014. Many refugees, who could only get eight months of insurance through RMA, will be able to get ongoing health insurance through the Marketplace.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) has developed YouTube videos and a fact sheet to help with outreach and enrollment activities. The six-minute video introduces the Health Insurance Marketplace to refugees and is available in six languages: English, Arabic, Kinyarwanda, Nepali, Sgaw Karen, and Somali. The fact sheet explains immigration statuses that qualify for Marketplace coverage including Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Plan.

Office of Refugee Resettlement: Health Insurance: The Affordable Care Act: http://1.usa.gov/1ahRPjQ

National Cancer Institute Launches New Quit Smoking Website in Spanish

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Roughly 5 million Hispanic Americans smoke, and lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Hispanic men and second leading cause among Hispanic women. To address this important public health issue, the National Cancer Institute developed Smokefree Español, a website created specifically for Spanish speakers who want to quit smoking or know someone who does. Resources include interactive checklists and quizzes, advice on how to help a loved one quit, and real-time support and information through Twitter and Pinterest.

Smokefree Español: http://1.usa.gov/1gh8pIW