Skip all navigation and go to page content
NN/LM Home About Us | Contact Us | Feedback |Site Map | Help | Bookmark and Share

Archive for the ‘Multilingual’ Category

Free NIH funded Medical Translation App

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Communicate quickly with patients using translated medical phrases in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Russian, Tagalog, Vietnamese, and more. Show phrases with text, and play with audio.

When needed, call live medical interpreters from Canopy.

Includes 1,500 common medical phrases created by medical professionals, available for 4 specialities:
Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and General Surgery

Phrases cover:
Greeting and Goodbye, History, Physical Exam, Labs, Radiology, Procedures, Labor and Delivery, Gynecology, Reassessment, Plan, and more.

Canopy has been funded by NIH to create various resources to support clinicians in providing care for underserved minorities. They’ve developed a medical translator app and are eager for input.
If you use the code below, you’ll have the app and subsequent upgrades
free of charge, even when they begin to charge for it:
Click http://bit.ly/1j8G8kK or search for “canopy” on the App Store, and use access code
75753  after you download.
If downloading on an iPad, make sure to switch to IPHONE ONLY apps when
you search on the App Store.
This code is only good until Tuesday April 22!  Download the app today to ensure free access.

Refugee Health Orientation Videos and Handouts From Healthy Roads Media

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Several years ago the Refugee Services Section of the Ohio Department of Job and Family services produced a wonderful DVD called Safe, Smart and Healthy that provides comprehensive information that meets the health education requirements of refugee health orientation.  The content was developed in 33 languages.  The DVD dissemination strategy is not completely useful in reaching all new refugees and Healthy Roads Media (HRM) was contacted to see if there might be a way to reformat the video content for the web.  The DVD content was broken up into 28 short segments, each covering specific topics.  This makes the content useful for information sessions of various lengths and in a variety of settings.  A number of these have been available for awhile.

Two new personal hygiene topics in 16 languages are now available as streaming web videos on the Healthy Roads Media Refugee Health Orientation page – http://bit.ly/1kGP8Qu

(Original message from Mary Alice Gillispie, Healthy Roads Media)

Multilingual Health Information from the CDC

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers free, downloadable fact sheets, pamphlets and educational materials available in many languages, for example Hepatitis B posters in Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean.  http://1.usa.gov/Oylnac

Patients With Limited English Proficiency

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

This training module from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) offers free handouts, slides, surveys and other tools to be utilized to train medical staff to work with patients who have limited English proficiency. The module is designed to help you develop a customized plan for your environment, and will provide insight into the concepts of teamwork as applied to your work with these patients. http://1.usa.gov/1gIdc5z

New Free Medical Translation App

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

With funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Canopy Medical Translator has been created. This free app can be used in situations where an interpreter is not available. It translates medical phrases covering history, physical exam, procedures, and reassessment in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Bengali, Filipino, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Russian, Vietnamese, and more: http://bit.ly/1gRUd4R

Webinar Series: Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Migrant Clinicians Network has designed the series *Essential Clinical Issues in Migration Health* for new as well as seasoned clinicians who are interested in understanding more about the migrant population. The series is divided into six webinars which cover a wide breadth of knowledge and skills to help clinicians provide quality care to one of the most difficult to reach populations in the United States.

Each module is accredited for an hour of Continuing Nursing or Continuing Medical Education. If you enroll for the entire series you will receive 6 full hours of free continuing education.

For more information and to register, go to the Migrant Clinicians Network web site: http://bit.ly/1gyfAat

NHLBI Report: Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book

Friday, March 7th, 2014

A comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits. These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), led by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities. The full report is available in English and Spanish.

Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities (English and Spanish): http://1.usa.gov/1hTbu0J

APHA’s Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks

Friday, March 7th, 2014

How often should you refresh your emergency supplies? At least every six months, experts say. But with everything else that’s going on in life, remembering to do so can be hard. That’s why American Public Health Association’s (APHA’s) Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks campaign uses the twice-a-year clock change as a reminder. The campaign advises people to refresh their stockpile, such as their emergency food, water and batteries, when they adjust their clocks for daylight saving time. Every American should have at least a three-day supply of food and water in case of an emergency, including one gallon of water per person per day, according to preparedness experts. Other supplies that should be on hand include a first-aid kit, a can opener, flashlight, battery-operated radio and batteries.

Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks (English and Spanish): http://bit.ly/1f776LR

Get Covered During Latino Enrollment Week

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Over 3 million Americans have enrolled in affordable health coverage. Many have shared their own stories about what it means to them — peace of mind, better coverage, security to pursue their dreams, and more. There are five weeks left until open enrollment closes on March 31. Let’s keep the momentum going and help more Americans get enrolled.

Encourage coverage on the Health Insurance Marketplace, http://1.usa.gov/1cKYZ4d, during Latino Enrollment Week, February 24-28. The U.S. Health and Human Services website offers these resources: Starting the Conversation http://1.usa.gov/1k7Tza6; Six reasons to get covered: http://1.usa.gov/N0tOKG; Sharing Stories: http://1.usa.gov/1hQCKQT; and Inscríbase antes del 15 de marzo: https://www.cuidadodesalud.gov/es/.

Depression and Heart Disease

Monday, February 10th, 2014

From the National Institute of Mental Health:

“People with heart disease are more likely to suffer from depression than otherwise healthy people. Angina and heart attacks are closely linked with depression. Researchers are unsure exactly why this occurs. They do know that some symptoms of depression may reduce your overall physical and mental health, increasing your risk for heart disease or making symptoms of heart disease worse. Fatigue or feelings of worthlessness may cause you to ignore your medication plan and avoid treatment for heart disease. Having depression increases your risk of death after a heart attack.

Download the full brochure in English or Spanish: http://1.usa.gov/MFLWZX