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Archive for the ‘Inner City’ Category

From the Urban Institute Health Policy Center

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

A new study by the Urban Institute focuses on health insurance literacy. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been helpful in creating an awareness that people who have never had insurance are expected to understand complex terminology.   This study shows racial/ethnic disparities in health literacy understanding. http://urbn.is/1hY0myc

Youth Speaks Against Diabetes

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

San Francisco poets from youthspeaks.org have teamed up with the University of California San Francisco to train young poets on how living conditions common in poorer neighborhood, such as unsafe streets, few green spaces, and a preponderance of fast food joints are a factor in the development of diabetes. Videos have been created and are part of a package available at: http://bit.ly/19fH9Df.  Dean Schillinger MD, U. of California-San Francisco, California Diabetes Program, and veteran health literacy researcher, helped mentor this project.

 

 

 

Community Health Center Uses TeleMedicine to Improve Pain Management

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

A Community Health Center in Middleton, Connecticut is tackling disparities in pain management with a new program utilizing telemedicine. The program provides access to specialty care for minority patients who are underserved by pharmacies and by health care providers: http://bit.ly/17q1c1q

Urban Diabetes Care and Outcomes Summary Report: Aggregate Results from Urban Indian Health Organizations, 2008-2012

Friday, June 7th, 2013

To better understand the trends in diabetes services and outcomes among AI/AN patients with diabetes, the Urban Indian Health Institute conducts an annual medical chart audit, also known as the Indian Health Service (IHS) Diabetes Care and Outcomes Audit. Information collected by these agencies is submitted to the IHS Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention (DDTP). This information is used for diabetes surveillance and to help provide a clinical overview of AI/ANs who receive diabetes care and services through the Indian health system. 12% of urban AI/ANs in UIHO service areas report being told by a doctor that they have diabetes compared with 8% of the general population. Poverty, limited access to care and high mobility create challenges for diabetes patients trying to access and receive regular care. In all UIHO service areas combined, significantly more AI/ANs (23%) live below the federal poverty level compared with the general population (14%). The full report is available at http://bit.ly/12wrhyI

Street Outreach Program Grants

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

The Administration on Children and Families has a call for proposals for Street Outreach Program (SOP) Grants.

Today, in communities across the country, young people are living on the streets after running from or being asked to leave homes characterized by abuse, neglect, or parental drug and alcohol abuse. Once on the streets, such youth are at risk of being sexually exploited or abused by adults for pleasure or profit. In addition, such youth may engage in shoplifting, survival sex, or drug dealing in order to provide for their basic needs. Since 1996, SOP has been aiding this population by funding grantees to provide street-based services to runaway, homeless, and street youth who have been subjected to, or are at risk of being subjected to, sexual abuse, prostitution, or sexual exploitation. These services, which are provided in areas where street youth congregate, are designed to assist such youth in making healthy choices regarding where they live and how they behave.

The Street Outreach Program grant fund grantees to provide street-based services to runaway, homeless and street youth who have been subjected to, oar are at risk of being subjected to sexual abuse, prostitution or sexual exploitation.  These services are designed to assist youth in making healthy choices regarding where they live and how they behave.  Eligible applicants include public and non-profit private entities that include States, localities, and coordinated networks of such entities. Per RHY Act section 351, for-profit organizations are not eligible. In selecting eligible applicants to receive grants under this FOA, priority will be given to entities that have experience in providing shelter and services to runaway, homeless, or street youth as required by the RHY Act. Faith-based and community organizations that meet eligibility requirements are eligible to receive awards under this funding opportunity announcement. Individuals, foreign entities, and sole proprietorship organizations are not eligible to compete for, or receive, awards made under this announcement.

Award amount: Approximately $160,000 per year for up to 3 years
Application Deadline: June 28, 2013

For more information and a link to the entire announcement, visit the grants.gov site: http://goo.gl/H50ZK

Branches of Opportunity

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

The Center for an Urban Future’s report, Branches of Opportunity, highlights the unique position of libraries to help cities address economic, demographic and social challenges.    According to the report, “No other institution, public or private, does a better job of reaching people who have been left behind in today’s economy, have failed to reach their potential in the city’s public school system or who simply need help navigating an increasingly complex world.  Although they are often thought of as cultural institutions, the reality is that the public libraries are a key component of the city’s human capital system. With roots in nearly every community across the five boroughs, New York’s public libraries play a critical role in helping adults upgrade their skills and find jobs, assisting immigrants assimilate, fostering reading skills in young people and providing technology access for those who don’t have a computer or an Internet connection at home.”   The report is a call to action for policymakers, social service leaders and economic officials to support and use public libraries as a critical 21st century resource of opportunity for all.  Read the full report at:   http://bit.ly/URNXnY

 

Nutritional Quality of Food Prepared at Home and Away From Home, 1977-2008

Friday, January 4th, 2013

Food prepared away from home (FAFH)—whether from table-service restaurants, fast-food establishments and other locations, or from a take-out or delivery meal eaten at home—is now a routine part of the diets of most Americans. Previous Economic Research Service (ERS) research found that FAFH tends to be lower in nutritional quality than food prepared at home (FAH), increases caloric intake, and reduces diet quality among adults and children. This study updates previous research by examining dietary guidance and the nutritional quality of FAH versus FAFH in 2005-08, compared with 1977-78. Poor diets contribute to obesity, heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and other health conditions that impose a substantial economic burden on individuals and society. The increased popularity of FAFH is prompting new health promotion strategies, such as menu labeling, to address this challenge. The full report, “Nutritional Quality of Food Prepared at Home and Away From Home, 1977-2008,” is available at http://1.usa.gov/TNtL3G

Pink Ribbon Sunday Program

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

The FDA Office of Women’s Health (OWH) launched the Pink Ribbon Sunday program to educate African American and Hispanic women about early detection of breast cancer through mammography. The program strives to reduce breast cancer health disparities by empowering community leaders to develop mammography awareness programs tailored to the needs of their region. Pink Ribbon Sunday originally targeted churches, but the program has since expanded to all types of organizations serving women from diverse ethnic, religious, and social backgrounds. Pink Ribbon Sunday activities have been conducted in urban and rural communities from Oklahoma to Puerto Rico, reaching over 100,000 women. Activities have ranged from mobile mammography events and health fairs to “Pink” luncheons and concerts.

Free copies of the how-to-guide, mammography fact sheets, and cards can be ordered at http://1.usa.gov/YecOSk

Use Your Phone to Access FEMA’s Disaster Resources

Monday, October 29th, 2012

As Hurricane Sandy approaches, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offer tips on what to do before, during and after a hurricane on their Facebook page at: http://on.fb.me/Q2j3I6.

Also, search for open shelters via text, using your zip code: http://1.usa.gov/XMN5jK. Follow the directions of local officials and stay safe!

Using Smartphones to Reduce Health Disparities

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Mobile technology has become especially critical for low-income minorities who otherwise can’t afford desktop and laptop computers with web service. According to Pew Internet, African Americans and Hispanics are more likes than whites to own a smartphone. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has made a call to developers to create a mobile application to educate minority womena about cancer screening.

http://bit.ly/QY4v7l