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Archive for the ‘Health Information Literacy’ Category

Cultural Competency to Address Health Disparities

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

The National Partnership for Action and Regional Health Equity Councils (RHECs) developed information about cultural competency and its importance in addressing bias and achieving health equity.

The Southeastern Health Equity Council published a white paper entitled “Cultural Competency: What is it and Why is it Necessary?” as well as a “Cultural Competency Resource Guide.” Both publications can be downloaded from http://bit.ly/1T0Zj6F.

The Mid-Atlantic RHEC hosted a webinar on July 15, 2015 about “The Importance of Equity for All: How Cultural Competency and Unconscious Bias Influences Health and Quality of Life.” The recording is available on this page: http://bit.ly/1THiEJt

Women in Clinical Trials

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

Marsha Henderson, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Assistant Commissioner for Women’s Health, encourages women to talk about participating in clinical trials. In her recent blog post, http://1.usa.gov/23vXhPx, she discusses her own experience and why it’s important for women to talk about clinical trials and potential participation. She also refers to the Women in Clinical Trials initiative from the FDA Office of Women’s Health, http://1.usa.gov/1nAOYBT. The site offers answers to questions women may have about joining clinical trials. Both sites emphasize that anyone interested in participating in trials needs to consult with health care providers. To find a clinical trial or see the types of trials that have been done, visit ClinicalTrials.gov.

 

Health Literacy Training for Health Professionals

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has developed, with OptumHealth, two learning modules on health literacy. The no-cost online modules are eligible for CME and CNE credits.

An Updated Overview of Health Literacy: http://bit.ly/1Nkty0g

Improving Health Literacy by Improving Communication Skills: http://bit.ly/1OGjNLI

Plain Language: Getting Started or Brushing Up

Friday, January 8th, 2016

Plain language is grammatically correct language that includes complete sentence structure and accurate word usage. Plain language is not unprofessional writing or a method of “dumbing down” or “talking down” to the reader. Writing that is clear and to the point helps improve communication and takes less time to read and understand. Clear writing tells the reader exactly what the reader needs to know without using unnecessary words or expressions. NIH’s Plain Language: Getting Started or Brushing Up is a handy tool to learn about using plain language in your work.

Plain Language: Getting Started or Brushing Up: http://1.usa.gov/1PiXlI9

The Importance of Heart Attack Symptoms and Early Treatment

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Adapted from article in Health Day (MedlinePlus):

In the article, Early Treatment Improves Heart Attack Outcomes, Study Finds, by Mary Elizabeth Dallas, the period to restore blood flow once a heart attack occurs is crucial to recovery and offsets long-term damage. Therefore, those who are alert to heart attack symptoms, often have better outcomes. The timeframe from heart attack symptoms to treatment is called “door-to-balloon” time.

The procedure to restore blood flow to the heart using a stent is called percutaneous coronary intervention. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association both state, “Treatment should be received in 90 minutes or less.”

In the study, 2,056 patient hospital records were examined and the results were published online Dec. 28 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The report found that patients who were treated longer than the recommend time frame of 90 minutes were less likely to have blood flood fully restored. Medical experts conclude that initial stages of door-to-balloon time and heart attack symptoms is crucial. For more information, the article can be found: http://1.usa.gov/1OvFrpo

Order a Year in Health planners

Friday, December 18th, 2015

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has multicultural 2016 planners that provide tips for staying healthy throughout the year.

There are four planners available for download or bulk order:

  • African American Health Planner
  • American Indian / Alaska Native / Native Hawaiian Health Planner
  • Asian American / Pacific Islander Health Planner
  • Hispanic / Latino Health Planner (bilingual)

Planners: http://1.usa.gov/1IdTi2Y

 

The Joint Commission’s New Speak Up Campaign to Reduce Readmissions

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

“Speak Up: Avoid a return trip to the hospital” uses easy-to-understand language to help patients understand the steps they should take after they are discharged to avoid returning to the hospital. The materials are free and available on The Joint Commission’s website. http://bit.ly/1k2FYTc

Know The Facts First: Sexual Health Information for Teen Girls

Monday, December 7th, 2015

According to the Office of Women’s Health, about 1 in 4 teens has a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). Today, the Office of Women’s Health released a new public health awareness campaign called Know The Facts First to help provide teen girls with accurate information about STIs.

Read the blog post announcing the new resource: http://1.usa.gov/1IA4w1z

Know The Facts First: http://knowthefactsfirst.gov/

Home Health Agency Ratings Get Medicare’s Star Treatment

Friday, November 27th, 2015

The federal government released on Thursday a new five-star rating system for home health agencies, hoping to bring clarity to a fast-growing but fragmented corner of the medical industry where it’s often difficult to distinguish good from bad.

Medicare applied the new quality measure to more than 9,000 agencies based on how quickly visits began and how often patients improved while under their care. Nearly half received average scores, with the government sparingly doling out top and bottom ratings. Read more about the ratings and rating system: bit.ly/1MVjRWU

5 Facts About Deductibles from Healthcare.gov

Friday, November 27th, 2015

Factoring in out-of-pocket costs has always been part of buying health insurance, but for the first time now there are a lot of resources to help you better understand your choices at HealthCare. gov. These include new features that allow you to see your total estimated out-of-pocket costs, to search health plans by your preferred provider and to see if your prescription drugs are covered. Read more about how to calculate and prepare for out-of-pocket costs when making your health insurance decisions: 1.usa.gov/1PS5hW5