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Archive for the ‘General’ Category

BHIC Blog Reader Questionnaire

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

Please share your feedback about this blog. Not only does it help us plan future posts but it also helps us to report its usefulness and necessity.

Originally published on April 21:

Hello readers!

We would like to hear from you. Please visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QQPT77X to complete a questionnaire about the Bringing Health Information to the Community blog’s usefulness and content. It should only take 5 minutes. We would like to receive as many responses as possible by noon on Friday, April 29.

Thank you so much for reading and for giving us your feedback. It helps us keep content relevant.

Walking and Walkable Communities

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The benefits of walking as exercise are numerous. But for people who live in areas where sidewalks are few or walking presents a danger, getting out and moving around can be more difficult. The Surgeon General published a Call to Action to promote walking and walkable cities. Even the Transportation Secretary touted the health benefits of walkable communities and safe streets. If you’re stuck in an unwalkable area (for the time being at least), consider some activity alternatives to walking outdoors, such as those listed on “How 10 Minutes Can Be Your Friend When You Want to Workout” http://1.usa.gov/1NqZrpB.

Infographic from SurgeonGeneral.gov

Infographic for Step It Up! The Surgeon General’s Call to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities. For a text-version of the information displayed on the infographic, go to http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/walking-and-walkable-communities/sector-infographic.html.

Medication-Assisted Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Pocket Guide

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

A new pocket guide from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration discusses the various types of approved medications, screening and assessment tools, and best practices for patient care. Learn more and download Medication-Assisted Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder Pocket Guide at: http://1.usa.gov/1qpPkMd

Pink Eye: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Have you, or know someone that has contracted pink eye? If so, you probably know that pink eye is fairly common. Conjunctivitis, the medical term for pink eye, is an inflammation of the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva is the thin, clear tissue that lines the inside of the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball. Inflammation of the conjunctiva causes blood vessels to become more visible and therefore gives the eye a pinkish color. To learn more about pink eye, its symptoms, how it can be treated, and prevention, please visit the CDC’s webpage for more information:http://1.usa.gov/1UGf6J7

 

County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

Friday, March 25th, 2016

The annual County Health Rankings measure vital health factors, including high school graduation rates, obesity, smoking, unemployment, access to healthy foods, the quality of air and water, income, and teen births in nearly every county in America. The annual Rankings provide a revealing snapshot of how health is influenced by where we live, learn, work and play. They provide a starting point for change in communities. The Rankings are based on a model of population health that emphasizes the many factors that, if improved, can help make communities healthier places to live, learn, work and play. To see how your county ranks and more information, please visit: bit.ly/1XSx88Q

Lung Cancer Screening Tools for Patients and Clinicians

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

New tools from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) can help longtime smokers between the ages of 55 and 80 make informed decisions with their health care provider on whether to get screened for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). The online tools are designed to support discussions between patients and providers about whether lung cancer screening is appropriate, as well as about the possible benefits and harms of screening using this method. LDCT is the only recommended screening test for lung cancer. The tools are designed for diverse users: http://1.usa.gov/1o76Za7, and printed versions are also available. Register here http://bit.ly/1q2FLTA for a webinar on April 7 to discuss how the resources can be used to meet requirements of Medicare and Medicaid services for hared decision-making and patient counseling.

Health Equity Forum

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) presents a Health Equity Forum Commemorating National Minority Health Month 2016 and the 30th Anniversary of the establishment of the HHS Office of Minority Health: “Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation” on Thursday, April 7, 2016, 1:30 – 3:30 PM EDT.

The Heckler Report marked the first convening of health experts by the U.S. government to conduct a comprehensive study of the health status of racial and ethnic minorities, elevated minority health onto a national stage, and led to the establishment of the Office of Minority Health (OMH) in 1986.  For 30 years, OMH has led efforts to improve the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities.

The Forum will highlight initiatives underway by the Obama Administration and HHS to reduce disparities and further efforts needed to accelerate health equity and expand opportunity for all. More information: http://1.usa.gov/1RzP8q6

Ways to be a safe patient

Monday, March 21st, 2016

The CDC has published a list of “10 Things You Can Do to Be a Safe Patient”. The number 1 tip is “Speak up. Talk to your doctor about all questions or worries you have. Ask them what they are doing to protect you.”

Read the other nine and get more information here: http://1.usa.gov/1RuUxPa

On St. Patrick’s Day eat green… leafy vegetables

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, here are a few reminders about the benefits of leafy green vegetables.

Lin Yan published the benefits of these foods in USDA Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center News, http://1.usa.gov/1U9vD8x on March 23, 2013. “Dark green leafy vegetables are great sources of nutrition. Salad greens, kale and spinach are rich in vitamins A, C, E and K, and broccoli, bok choy and mustard are also rich in many of the B-vitamins. These vegetables also contain an abundance of carotenoids—antioxidants that protect cells and play roles in blocking the early stages of cancer. They also contain high levels of fiber, iron, magnesium, potassium and calcium. Furthermore, greens have very little carbohydrates, sodium and cholesterol…The dark greens supply a significant amount of folate, a B vitamin that promotes heart health and helps prevent certain birth defects.”

Ingrid Adams from the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service outlines benefits of dark, leafy green vegetables as well as tips on their shopping, preparation, and storage. http://bit.ly/1S6qqdY

Safer, More Effective Pain Management

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

Guideline information for patients on how to be safe when using opioids for chronic management can be found on the CDC site at http://1.usa.gov/1Xvaa7u

Learn what opioids are and the risks and side effects of prescription opioid pain relievers.