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Archive for the ‘Environmental Health’ Category

Recommended Reading: ‘Pollution is Segregated, Too’

Friday, April 18th, 2014

From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Recommended Reading page:

“After decades of studies demonstrating that poor people and minorities are more likely than their white counterparts to live near health hazards such as toxic waste sites, landfills and congested highways, a new study in the journal PLOS One took a more refined look at a particular aspect in the area of “environmental injustice”: exposure to nitrogen dioxide. The pollutant—which is produced by cars, construction equipment and industrial sources—is linked to higher risk of both asthma and heart attack.

Using data from the 2000 Census, researchers determined that minorities are on average exposed to 38 percent higher levels of outdoor nitrogen dioxide.”

For the complete recommended reading article as well as a link to the article itself, visit the RWJF’s Public Health blog: http://bit.ly/1jR5IxN

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences offers a free webinar sponsored by its Partnerships for Environmental Health on April 25, 2014, 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time, “Assessing Population Vulnerability to Health Impacts of Climate Change”:  http://1.usa.gov/1l8W1tT

Certain populations are particularly at risk to the health effects of climate change, including children, pregnant women, the elderly, individuals from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds, and those living in urban or coastal areas. This webinar will describe ongoing research focused on assessing factors that may mediate increased risks among select vulnerable populations.

 

Tele-townhall: Chronic Disease, Air Pollution and Public Health: Risk, Prevention, & Preparedness

Monday, April 7th, 2014

On Wednesday, April 9, from 3:30-4:30PM ET, the American Public Health Association will host a “tele-townhall” on the health effects of air pollution.

From the American Public Health Association:

“Celebrate National Public Health Week by joining, “Chronic Disease, Air Pollution & Public Health: Risk, Prevention, & Preparedness” – a tele-townhall discussion with EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and HHS Assistant Secretary for Health, Howard Koh, MD, MPH together with national health leaders from the American Lung Association and American Public Health Association and others as they discuss the health impacts of air pollution, including worsening conditions due to climate change. Participants can also look forward to hearing about efforts underway today to better protect the public, especially children, elderly and those living with chronic lung or heart disease.

This event sponsored by the American Lung Association, the American Public Health Association, the American Thoracic Society, the American Heart Association, Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, Trust for America’s Health, and the National Association of County and City Health Officials.”

Register: http://bit.ly/1k8oNyH

FDA approves first sublingual allergen extract

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

FDA approves first sublingual allergen extract for the treatment of certain grass pollen allergies.

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved Oralair to treat allergic rhinitis (hay fever) with or without conjunctivitis (eye inflammation) that is induced by certain grass pollens in people ages 10 through 65 years. Oralair is the first sublingual (under the tongue) allergen extract approved in the United States. After administration of the first dose at the health care provider’s office, where the patient can be observed for potential adverse reactions, Oralair can be taken at home.

“While there is no cure for grass pollen allergies, they can be managed through treatment and avoiding exposure to the pollen,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “The approval of Oralair provides an alternative to allergy shots that must be given in a health care provider’s office. Oralair can be taken at home after the first administration.”
Oralair is a once-daily tablet that rapidly dissolves after it is placed under the tongue. Oralair is started four months before the start of the grass pollen season and continued throughout the season. The first dose is taken at the health care provider’s office, where the patient is to be observed for at least 30 minutes for potential adverse reactions.
Oralair contains a mixture of freeze-dried extracts from the pollens of five grasses, including Kentucky Blue Grass, Orchard, Perennial Rye, Sweet Vernal and Timothy.”

Guidance for private well owners: webinars

Monday, January 13th, 2014

The National Ground Water Association, with funding from the Environmental Protection Agency, is providing a no-cost webinar series for private well owners. Upcoming topics include:

  • Testing Your Well Water: Where Do You Begin? (January 28)
  • Treating Well Water: Where Do You Begin? (February 4)
  • Water Well Maintenance: Where Do You Begin? (February 26)

Register for the webinars: http://bit.ly/1eAmoFG

The webinars will be recorded and available via Wellowner.org.

 

Youth Speaks Against Diabetes

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

San Francisco poets from youthspeaks.org have teamed up with the University of California San Francisco to train young poets on how living conditions common in poorer neighborhood, such as unsafe streets, few green spaces, and a preponderance of fast food joints are a factor in the development of diabetes. Videos have been created and are part of a package available at: http://bit.ly/19fH9Df.  Dean Schillinger MD, U. of California-San Francisco, California Diabetes Program, and veteran health literacy researcher, helped mentor this project.

 

 

 

Lead Poisoning Prevention

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

This year’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week theme, “Lead-Free Kids for a Healthy Future,” underscores the importance of the many ways parents can reduce a child’s exposure to lead and prevent its serious health effects. See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s website for resources and ideas: http://1.usa.gov/H2L1jp

Reducing Environmental Exposures: Resources

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Do you live near natural gas drilling or other areas of industrial pollution? The Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project has tips for “breaking the pathways of exposure” in your home. Resources include ways to reduce your exposure to air, water, noise and light pollutants.  There is also a toolkit for medical personnel: “Health Concerns in the Era of Gas Drilling: A Basic Toolkit for Healthcare Providers.”

Access resources here: http://bit.ly/15hlrQy

National Farm Safety & Health Week

Monday, September 16th, 2013

September 15-21 is National Farm Safety & Health Week.  According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), farm workers are 7x more likely to die on the job than other workers in private industry. Health concerns at farms include machinery accidents, chemicals and pesticides, and injuries from livestock.

For information on these and other environmental and occupational health hazards, check out the following resources.

MedlinePlus–Farm Health and Safety: http://1.usa.gov/15YkGil

Tox Town Farm: http://1.usa.gov/16qSuSH

National Center for Farmworker Health: http://www.ncfh.org/

OSHA: http://1.usa.gov/1bfnqJa

 

 

American Public Health Association’s Get Ready Day on September 17

Friday, September 13th, 2013

Launched in 2006, APHA’s Get Ready campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. The campaign includes free resources for the public and health workers, including fact sheets, a blog, a Twitter, podcasts, Q&As and a calendar of events. Use of Get Ready materials and information is encouraged. You may print and photocopy Get Ready fact sheets, game, toolkits, guides or other materials without permission and use them for educational activities at work, school, community fairs, health departments, town hall meetings, preparedness events, etc. APHA must be identified as the source of Get Ready materials.

To see additional APHA resources for your Get Ready Day event: http://bit.ly/16qdWau

To find more resources for disaster preparedness, visit the Disaster Information Management Resource Center (DIMRC) website: http://1.usa.gov/17V1U9p