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Archive for the ‘Children and Teens’ Category

New Science iOS Games for Grades 5 to 12

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

sis_student_games_2016

There are three new interactive, educational apps from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Division of Specialized Information Services for students studying genetics, chemistry and environmental health science.

Bohr Thru: Use a 3-match game style to collect protons, neutrons, and electrons to create the first 18 elements on the periodic table. With the help of the main character, Atom, players become familiar with a variety of chemical elements and their structures.

Base Chase: Learn the bases of DNA with this fast-paced, educational app. Players grab bases of DNA in order to complete unique DNA strands for a variety of animals. DeeNA, the game’s cartoon mascot, assists players in completing each of the required tasks.

Run4Green: The importance of environmental conservation is reinforced through this interactive game. Topics, such as greenhouse gas reduction, renewable energy and green product purchases are emphasized and rewarded throughout game play. The game is appropriate for students in grades 5-8.

Download these games on your iPhone, iPad and iPod touch by visiting the NLM app page at: http://apple.co/1nqG891

‘Standing Desks’ in Classrooms May Kickstart Kids’ Activity

Monday, January 25th, 2016

A new systematic review reports that use of “standing desks” at school helped kids get more active.

Experts noted that the review’s findings weren’t surprising, but said more research is needed to pinpoint actual health benefits to children from using standing desks.

The researchers also found that standing desk use was tentatively linked to better classroom behavior and greater energy expenditure among children, although the results were mixed — stemming from varied studies.

The systematic review was published online Jan. 22 in the journal Pediatrics.

Link to the abstract: http://1.usa.gov/1WKQIUA

SOURCES: Karl Minges, M.P.H., doctoral candidate, Yale School of Nursing, Orange, Conn.; David A. Paul, M.D., chair, department of pediatrics, Christiana Care Health System, Wilmington, Del.; James F. Sallis, Ph.D., professor, family medicine and public health, chief, division of behavioral medicine, and director, active living research, University of California, San Diego; February 2016, Pediatrics

 

Diabetes in Children and Teens

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

The American Diabetes Association estimates that there are 208,000 Americans under the age of 20 diagnosed with diabetes.

MedlinePlus has a Health Topics page devoted to Diabetes in Children and Teens. It has links to many useful resources about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and a number of the resources are available in Spanish. http://1.usa.gov/1Pkwj9l

The National Diabetes Education Program has a resource site for Youth and Teens Living With Diabetes. Teens can read about diabetes and how to manage their disease. Parents can read answers to many questions they have after their child has been diagnosed. The site includes information on both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. http://1.usa.gov/1PkvYmX

New Mobile Apps from SAMHSA

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Three new mobile apps are presented by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Division (SAMHSA): Talk. They Hear You (addressing underage drinking), Suicide Safe, and KnowBullying. These free apps are available for Apple and Android devices and show ways to start important conversations, as well as providing strategies. http://1.usa.gov/1RNjQtn

Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: A Guide for Practitioners

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

The U.S. Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families has published a new fact sheet: Promoting Protective Factors for Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: A Guide for Practitioners. A review of current research linking protective factors to well-being for children exposed to domestic violence is covered.  Topics include individual skills and capacities that can improve the well-being of children exposed to violence; how parents, guardians, and others can contribute to the well-being of these children; creating supportive communities; and strategies for practitioners. For more information, see: http://1.usa.gov/1RNifE2

Connecting Kids to Coverage

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

February 11 at 3:00 pm EST (2:00 pm CT, 1:00 pm MT, Noon PT)

Register for the free webinar http://bit.ly/1P7sspV

Children and teenagers in your congregation or community may qualify for free or low-cost health insurance coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Many parents may be eligible for Medicaid as well. Learn about the nationwide effort to identify children and youth eligible for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and get them enrolled http://1.usa.gov/1OoM2hS

 

Teen Nutrition: Making Healthy Choices Easier

Monday, January 11th, 2016

This month’s Healthy You tipsheet from the American Public Health Association features advice on how to make healthy eating easier for teens. The tipsheet is available in English, Spanish, easy-to-read and audio versions.

Healthy You (APHA): http://bit.ly/UD9hur

Get kids vaccinated to prevent cervical cancer

Monday, January 11th, 2016

According to the Centers for Disease Control, roughly 4,000 women die in the United States every year from cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine can help prevent cervical and other cancers. The vaccine is very safe and has cut human papillomavirus infections among teen girls by half since 2006. Both boys and girls should get the HPV vaccine by age 13.

Protect Your Daughters from Cervical Cancer (CDC): http://1.usa.gov/1RwFaFg

MedlinePlus has information on HPV in English and eleven other languages: http://1.usa.gov/1SdgWzQ

E-cigarette Ads are Reaching Middle and High School Students

Friday, January 8th, 2016

About 7 in 10 middle and high school students – more than 18 million young people – see e-cigarette advertising in stores, online, in newspapers and magazines, or on television and in movies, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report. E-cigarette ads use many of the same themes – independence, rebellion and sex – used to sell cigarettes and other conventional tobacco products. Advertising of tobacco products has been shown to cause youth to start using those products. The unrestricted marketing of e-cigarettes and dramatic increases in their use by youth could reverse decades of progress in preventing tobacco use among youth. Efforts by states, communities, and others could reduce this exposure.

CDC E-cigarette Ads and Youth: http://1.usa.gov/1S8qJXT

The Relationship of Nearsightedness found in U.S. Children and Electronic Devices

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Adapted from article in Health Day (MedlinePlus):

In the article, More Computer Time May Be Causing Nearsightedness in U.S. Kids, the time allotted to electronic devices may be causing nearsightedness in children across the United States. Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, has doubled in the last 50 years according to ophthalmologists. Dr. David Hunter, chief of ophthalmology at Boston Children’s Hospital explains, “Nearsightedness is when your eyes are capable of focusing up close but not far away. It generally happens when the eye grows too long, and the best focus point no longer aligns well with the area at the back of the eye called the retina.” Experts suspect the increase in Myopia rates found in children is because of the ongoing trend of many focusing on something near their eyes in artificial light and the lack of time spent outdoors in natural light. For more information, the article can be found here: http://1.usa.gov/1PKzbJi