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Archive for the ‘Articles’ Category

Making Health Care Safer: new report on patient safety

Monday, March 18th, 2013

From the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality:

“Making Health Care Safer ll, An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices, a new report by AHRQ, encourages health care providers to adopt patient safety strategies that are proven to be effective. The new report emphasizes evidence about implementation, adoption and the context in which safety strategies have been used. This helps clinicians understand what works, how to apply it, and under what circumstances it works best so they can adapt it to local needs. It also identifies gaps where more research can propel patient safety efforts further. Widespread adoption of the encouraged strategies has the potential to save hundreds—if not thousands—of lives, the authors estimate.”

See the 22 recommended strategies: http://1.usa.gov/YkSTPc

Read the full-report: http://1.usa.gov/1425TQN

Interesting Article and Issue of Health Affairs

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Health Affairs, Issue title: New Era of Patient Engagement, February 2013; Volume 32, Issue 2.

Health Affairs, Health Policy Brief: Patient Engagement, Feb. 14, 2013 < http://bit.ly/ViCa29>

Report: AHRQ Minority Health: Recent Findings Program Brief

Friday, March 1st, 2013

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) supports extramural and intramural research on a broad range of topics related to health care quality and safety, effectiveness and outcomes, evidence-based medicine, health care delivery, and the costs and financing of health care. AHRQ also supports targeted research on health care for specific priority populations, including minorities. This program brief summarizes findings from AHRQ-supported research on minority health reported in the literature and/or published by AHRQ from 2008 through mid-2012.

Minority Health: Recent Findings: http://1.usa.gov/12fzEOk

Report: Equity in the Digital Age: How Health Information Technology Can Reduce Disparities

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Communities of color could see significant improvements in their health through strategic use of emerging technologies in health care, according to a new report, Equity in the Digital Age: How Health Information Technology Can Reduce Disparities. This report by the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network (CPEHN), the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF), Consumers Union, and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), offers policy recommendations for how advancements can best improve health in all communities and highlights the importance of improving access to new technologies in underserved areas to avoid exacerbating existing disparities.

Equity in the Digital Age: How Health Information Technology Can Reduce Disparities: http://bit.ly/Y3tvwi

Global Burden of Disease study

Monday, February 18th, 2013

The Lancet has published the results of a five year study–the Global Burden of Disease 2010.

The full issue can be read online: http://bit.ly/12YDf2o

For more information about the study, including data visualization, go to the study website: http://bit.ly/12CeOIb

 

Stable Housing Fact Sheet

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

The National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) released a fact sheet entitled, “Fostering Health Families Through Stable Housing – The Role of the Health Care System.”  This fact sheet considers how health plans and their foundations can contribute to improving housing and health care for homeless and at-risk children, with examples and resources to guide health plan efforts.

View the full Stable Housing Fact Sheet online (PDF file): http://bit.ly/VQJksc

New report: Strategies to Move from Sick Care to Health Care in Four Years

Monday, February 4th, 2013

The Trust for America’s Health has released a new report entitled A Healthier America 2013: Strategies to Move from Sick Care to Health Care in Four Years.  The report provides high-impact prevention recommendations in 10 public health areas.

  • reversing the obesity epidemic
  • preventing tobacco use and exposure
  • encouraging healthy aging
  • improving the health of low-income and minority communities
  • strengthening healthy women, healthy babies
  • reducing environmental health threats
  • enhancing injury prevention
  • preventing and controlling infectious diseases
  • prioritizing health emergencies and bioterrorism preparedness
  • fixing food safety

The report provides 15 real-world, community-based case studies of successful prevention initiatives. [Source: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation]

Access the report: http://bit.ly/12n7tMd

Report: Information on Small Populations with Significant Health Disparities

Friday, February 1st, 2013

Carolyn Wong, Hannah Hosotani, and John Her analyze publicly available sources of data on Asian Americans in Massachusetts and recommend ways to improve this collection of data in a new report, Information on Small Populations with Significant Health Disparities: A Report on Data Collected on the Health of Asian Americans in Massachusetts. Recommendations include partnering with target communities to conduct local studies, collecting data from community-based clinics, promoting community participation, improving sampling of Asian Americans, improving intake worker training, promoting consistent sharable data, and providing better online documentation.

The full report is available online at http://bit.ly/XcU9Te

Nursing Care for LGBT Patients

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

This article from Nursing2013 offers tools and resources for clinical care of sexual minorities. A clear understanding of each patient’s needs is critical for quality patient care. The article emphasizes the importance of knowing a patient’s sexual orientation and gender identity in order to provide comprehensive and sensitive nursing care. It reviews key issues that sexual minorities encounter in the healthcare setting and provides guidance on assessing GLBTQ patients.

Read the article here: http://bit.ly/11g0XXy

Pediatricians Release New Childhood And Adolescent Immunization Schedule

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued the policy statement, “Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule – United States, 2013,” published in the February 2013 Pediatrics (published online Jan. 28). The new schedule includes several changes, including a full redesign due to the complexity of the schedules and the need for additional space in the footnotes to clarify vaccine recommendations. The major vaccine schedule changes from last year include the administration of tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine to adolescents and adults during each pregnancy. This recommendation is in response to the increasing number of pertussis cases nationally. Because infants are most at-risk of contracting pertussis (whooping cough), before they can be immunized themselves, they are better protected from this potentially deadly disease if the mother receives the vaccine during each pregnancy. In addition, the pneumococcal vaccine footnote itemizes the medical conditions for administration of PCV13 in children ages 24 through 71 months and for use of PPSV23 in children 2 years of age and older, and the meningococcal footnote includes guidance for immunization of children 2 months through 10 years of age with high-risk conditions. These schedules have been approved by the AAP, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians.

To see the full recommendation, follow this link: http://bit.ly/XQdLx1