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Community Health Status Indicators Tool

Community Health Status Indicators show how social factors and the physical environment are especially important because they represent the conditions in which people are born, work, and play. Neighborhoods with affordable healthy food, safe and accessible housing, and quality employment opportunities can positively influence behaviors and help to create healthy lifestyles. See the Centers for Disease Control Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI), http://1.usa.gov/1CQ9679, an interactive online tool that provides public health profiles for all 3,143 counties in the United States.

Community Health Worker (CHW) Toolkit

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)’s Community Health Worker (CHW) Toolkit includes information that state health departments can use to train and further build capacity of their community health workers, as well as helpful resources that CHWs can use within their communities. Learn more: http://1.usa.gov/1xhv2Y2

Suicide Safe Mobile App

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) announces a new mobile app, Suicide Safe. This app is based on the nationally recognized Suicide Assessment Five-Step Evaluation and Triage (SAFE-T) card, and is designed to help primary care and behavioral health providers integrate suicide prevention strategies into their practices and address suicide risk among their patients. Available for Android http://bit.ly/1Nhqzqe and IOS operating systems: http://apple.co/1BpjdLL.

People with Low Incomes Say They Pay a Price in Poor Health

A National Public Radio story discusses the differences in perceptions in what affects health for those with low incomes vs. those with higher incomes. Some factors are bad housing, low-paying jobs and unemployment, which can harm health status and increase the odds of developing stress-related health conditions. http://n.pr/1xvbyj4  

 

Best and Worst Hospital Rankings Often Conflict, Confuse Consumers

A Health Affairs study finds measurements for hospital quality rating systems rarely come to the same conclusions. This can lead to consumer confusion. Consumers need to be aware of the potential limitations of hospital rankings in order to make informed choices. http://bit.ly/1bqvrxu

 

WebMD Knows Best?

An interesting article on how the digital era is changing the way consumers make medical decisions and sorting out the good information from the irrelevant or bad. Even though people are doing more online research, which is influencing medical decisions, the information found is often not discussed with our doctors. This article discusses the importance of integrating what we find with our office visits so that context and expertise needed to interpret those findings are part of the medical decision-making process. http://slate.me/1CM1iDg

 

Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse

“The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) is an initiative of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A strategic part of OPRE’s mission to provide synthesis and dissemination of research and demonstration findings, the SSRC provides researchers, policymakers, and practitioners access to high-quality research focusing on self-sufficiency, employment, and family and child well-being.”

Included in the SSRC is research on access to health care and the relationship between health status and income.

Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse: https://www.opressrc.org/

Health Topic page: http://bit.ly/1FKkcva

Study Finds No Link Between Limited English Proficiency and Increased Risk of Mortality

From the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality:

“Patients with limited English proficiency have known limitations accessing health care in the United States, including access to hospital care, but those limitations don’t appear to increase the risk of mortality, according to an AHRQ-funded study.”

Citation:

Hines, A.L.; Andrews, R.M.; Moy, E.; Barrett, M.L.; Coffey, R.M. Disparities in Rates of Inpatient Mortality and Adverse Events: Race/Ethnicity and Language as Independent Contributors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 13017-13034.

The full-text article is available via Open Access: http://bit.ly/1I5o4Gq

Youth Violence Prevention Week: Resources

March 23-27 is National Youth Violence Prevention Week. MedlinePlus has resources to help parents, caregivers and teens understand, prevent and cope with youth violence.

Teen Violence (MedlinePlus): http://1.usa.gov/1DFiLyK

Important News About Quick Health Data Online

After many years of hosting Quick 
Heath Data Online, the Office on 
Women’s Health has decided to close down the website. The website, www.healthstatus2020.com, will no 
longer be available after March 31, 2015.

In the meantime, we encourage you to save and download the special features including:

 

If you have questions, please email: womenshealth@hhs.gov

You can continue to find free and reliable women’s health statistics online.  http://1.usa.gov/1MR62KG