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Increasing Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates

The National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable has published a manual that provides recommendations and step by step instructions that community health centers can implement to increase colorectal cancer screening rates. Tips are included to  set  up processes in efficient ways and save healthcare providers’ time. To access this new resource, “Cancer Screening Rates: A Manual for Community Health Centers”, see: http://bit.ly/10l1wBs

AAMC Research Update

Twice monthly, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) posts citations to newly published research articles describing efforts to detect, understand, or reduce health disparities and disparities in care. This resource is an efficient way to stay current and inform your health disparities work: http://bit.ly/1rrz3Fd

Moving Beyond Screening to Prevent Mental Illness and Substance Use

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has released a new newsletter about substance abuse and mental illness prevention in the primary care setting. The currently featured article is “Moving Beyond Screening to Prevent Mental Illness and Substance Use: What can be Achieved in Primary Care?” Articles feature a provider profile, evidence-based tips, webinars and other topics.  See the SAMHSA newsletter here: http://1.usa.gov/10l1iKs

Sickle Cell Disease: Resources

According to the Centers for Disease Control, Sickle Cell Disease affects millions around the world, including 1 in 12 African Americans.

The CDC has resources on living well with Sickle Cell Disease, as well as tips for school staff and caregivers, treatment information, data and statistics, and research.

Sickle Cell Disease (CDC): http://1.usa.gov/1rnqJpY

 

Emergency preparedness Tips from Tots

The Get Ready Campaign from the American Public Health Association has published a 2015 calendar featuring emergency preparedness “Tips from Tots.”

From APHA:

“Each month features a different tot practicing emergency preparedness and dispensing helpful safety advice, including dressing for extreme weather, where to find shelter during a storm and what to include in an emergency supply kit.”

Download the calendar and see the adorable photo gallery: http://bit.ly/1uVZK2y

World Heart Day: Prevention

September 29, 2014 is World Heart Day. To learn about heart-healthy lifestyle choices, visit MedlinePlus.

Heart Diseases–Prevention (MedlinePlus): http://1.usa.gov/1DRtAM5

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

Saturday, September 27, 2014 is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. This day “aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications”.

Find a collection site near you by visiting the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Diversion Control webpage: http://1.usa.gov/HVVcRV

New Ways to Fight Migraines

For those who suffer from migraine headaches and cannot tolerate drug treatments, the onset of a migraine can mean being unable to function normally for up to 72 hours. In this consumer update from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), two new prescription devices may offer much needed relief. In clinical studies, both devices have shown to be effective with minimal risks and side effects when used correctly.

For information on these devices, visit the FDA’s consumer update page: http://1.usa.gov/1t2jD5U

World Rabies Day is September 28

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

More than 90% of all animal rabies cases reported to CDC each year occur in wild animals. The main animals that get rabies include raccoons, bats, skunks and foxes.

One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to avoid contact with wild animals. Do not feed or handle them, even if they seem friendly.

Raccoons, bats, skunks and foxes often get rabies and should be avoided.

If you see an animal acting strangely, report it to animal control. Some things to look for are:

  • General sickness
  • Problems swallowing
  • Lots of drool or saliva
  • An animal that appears more tame than you would expect
  • An animal that bites at everything
  • An animal that’s having trouble moving or may even be paralyzed

Sometimes, people may come across a dead animal. Never pick up or touch dead animals. The rabies virus may still be present in the saliva or nervous tissue, especially if they have only been dead for a short time. If you see a dead animal, call animal control to take care of the animal’s body.

For more information and statistics on World Rabies Day, visit the CDC website: http://1.usa.gov/1u35Tft

Flu Shot Season is Around the Corner

Everyone needs a flu shot every flu season. Less than half of all Americans got a flu shot last year.”It’s really unfortunate that half of Americans are not getting the protection from flu they could get,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

You should get vaccinated every year for two reasons.

Flu viruses are constantly changing. The flu vaccine is often updated from one season to the next to protect against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season.

A person’s immune protection from vaccination declines over time so annual vaccination is needed for optimal protection. Annual vaccination is recommended even for those who received the vaccine during the previous flu season.

Watch this fun 30 second video to learn why everyone needs a flu vaccine! http://1.usa.gov/1up671Z

For more information about flu shots go to http://1.usa.gov/Y6YO0V

“Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine” in English and Spanish

http://1.usa.gov/1rnbz2Z (English)   http://1.usa.gov/ZLDtLF(Spanish)