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News from the CDC

The key findings from a series of CDC reports released online today by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) has found that American Indian and Alaska Native death rates are nearly 50 percent greater than those of non-Hispanic whites. http://1.usa.gov/1lGhm2E

“The authors reviewed trends from 1990 through 2009, and compared death rates between AI/AN people and non-Hispanic whites by geographic regions for a more recent time period (1999-2009).”

“The report concludes that patterns of mortality are strongly influenced by the high incidence of diabetes, smoking prevalence, problem drinking, and health-harming social determinants. Many of the observed excess deaths can be addressed through evidence-based public health interventions.”

For more information, the articles from the report will be in the AJPH “First Lookearly online section at 4:00 pm EST today, 4/23/2014.

National Physical Fitness and Sports Month

May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. Get your outreach toolkit and be ready to promote this event with campaign materials and resources available courtesy of the Federal Occupational Health (FOH) Center for Health Communications. http://1.usa.gov/1fr3T6D

Reducing Asthma and Allergy Triggers

Spring is here. The American Lung Association has some tips on how to control springtime allergy and asthma symptoms.

http://bit.yl/1hplb2j

 

 

 

 

 

MyEnvironment: local environmental health information

MyEnvironment, from the Environmental Protection Agency, allows a user to view a cross-section of environmental information based on location. Users can search by city, county, state and even park or waterbody name. Pulling from a variety of sources, users can track releases of contaminants and hazardous substances, monitor air and water quality, view energy use and production statistics and read environmental reports. Users can also create maps and download data.

MyEnvironment: http://1.usa.gov/1k00jEL

Seasonal allergies: Resources

For many, spring time brings seasonal allergies. MedlinePlus has resources on the diagnosis, prevention and control of seasonal allergy symptoms, including tips on how to determine if you have a cold or allergies.

MedlinePlus: Hay Fever http://1.usa.gov/1jqELhm

Take a Walk in a Park!

April 19-27, 2014, is National Parks Week.  The National Park Service has partnered with doctors and healthcare organizations to promote outdoor recreation as part of a healthy lifestyle.

See examples of healthcare/National Park Service partnerships: http://1.usa.gov/QzIhyS

Find a national park near you: http://1.usa.gov/REW5t5

America’s PrepareAthon National Day of Action is April 30th!

From America’s PrepareAthon:

America’s PrepareAthon! is a nationwide, community-based campaign for action to increase emergency preparedness and resilience through hazard-specific drills, group discussions and exercises conducted at the national level every fall and spring.

The first National Day of Action is scheduled for April 30, 2014 and will revolve around taking the actions to prepare for these four specific hazards:

  • Tornadoes
  • Wildfires
  • Floods
  • Hurricanes

For more information about how to participate, visit America’s PrepareAthon website: http://1.usa.gov/1qVd9H8

Recommended Reading: ‘Pollution is Segregated, Too’

From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Recommended Reading page:

“After decades of studies demonstrating that poor people and minorities are more likely than their white counterparts to live near health hazards such as toxic waste sites, landfills and congested highways, a new study in the journal PLOS One took a more refined look at a particular aspect in the area of “environmental injustice”: exposure to nitrogen dioxide. The pollutant—which is produced by cars, construction equipment and industrial sources—is linked to higher risk of both asthma and heart attack.

Using data from the 2000 Census, researchers determined that minorities are on average exposed to 38 percent higher levels of outdoor nitrogen dioxide.”

For the complete recommended reading article as well as a link to the article itself, visit the RWJF’s Public Health blog: http://bit.ly/1jR5IxN

Incidence and Trends of Infection with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR):

Foodborne disease continues to be an important problem in the United States. Most illnesses are preventable. To evaluate progress toward prevention, the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network* (FoodNet) monitors the incidence of laboratory-confirmed infections caused by nine pathogens transmitted commonly through food in 10 U.S. sites, covering approximately 15% of the U.S. population. This report summarizes preliminary 2013 data and describes trends since 2006.

For the complete MMWR, visit the CDC MMWR page: http://1.usa.gov/1qV9qte

Fighting Diabetes’ Deadly Impact on Minorities

FDA Consumer Update –  You inherit more than your eye and hair color from your family. You can also inherit a predisposition for diabetes, a disease that disproportionally affects racial and ethnic minorities.

The Office of Minority Health (OMH) at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is building relationships with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and other groups to help Americans prevent and treat diabetes, and to address the disparity in how severely it affects minority groups in particular. To learn more visit: http://1.usa.gov/1j9bZDc