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Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Held at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004 - August 2004

Publication Information

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Deadline for Proposals June 4, 2004

http://nnlm.gov/sea/outreach/rfqs/2004/accesselec.pdf

Access to Electronic Health Information

The National Library of Medicine® is pleased to announce the solicitation of proposals for outreach initiatives that ensure that health professionals, their patients and the general public are connected to the health information resources they need to make informed health care decisions.

Goal - improved access to electronic health information for:

  1. consumers,

  2. underserved and minority health care professionals,

  3. public health workers,

  4. public libraries, and

  5. community-based and faith-based organizations.

Eligible outreach activities include:

  1. promoting awareness of relevant health information resources at the regional, state, and local level through presentations, demonstrations, and exhibits;

  2. linking individuals and organizations with a National Network of Libraries of Medicine® (NN/LM®) member for backup assistance in locating hard to find information;

  3. obtaining the full text of journal articles;

  4. teaching how to search the Internet for reliable and authoritative health information;

  5. demonstrating and teaching the use of PubMed ®, MedlinePlus ®, ClinicalTrials.gov , Partners in Information Access for the Public Health Workforce , additional NLM® databases, and other sources to obtain health information; and

  6. developing links to local, state and regional health-related information to enhance what is available in MedlinePlus for consumers.

Applicant eligibility:

  1. Full and Affiliate members of the NN/LM are eligible to apply as well as those who are eligible for Network membership.

  2. Applicants may be:

    1. groups of institutions where a single, lead institution, which must be an NN/LM member, may apply on behalf of the group.

    2. health sciences libraries

    3. health information resource centers

    4. public libraries

    5. state organizations, and

    6. public health departments which provide health information services are eligible for Network membership.

Funding particulars:

  1. the lead institution will subcontract to NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region and have responsibility for the planning, direction, and execution of the proposed project.

  2. single institution awards are offered for up to $10,000;

  3. collaborative project awards are offered for up to $40,000.

These amounts are inclusive of all indirect costs.
Please note that all awards are made as cost reimbursement subcontracts.

Proposals are due to the NN/LM SE/A on June 04, 2004.

Please send proposals to:
Janice Kelly, Executive Director
NN/LM Southeastern/Atlantic Region
University of Maryland HS/HSL
601 West Lombard Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1512

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index


Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Held at MLA in May 2004

There will be an informational meeting on Go Local at the Medical Library Association annual meeting from 5:00-6:30 p.m. on May 24. The meeting agenda follows:

Purpose and intent of Go Local

  1. Goal #1 is not to repeat what MedlinePlus already does. It is to identify and connect people with local or regional services and resources.

  2. Participating organizations will maintain their independence, yet will have a presence inside MedlinePlus , as well.

Pilot and Examples

  1. North Carolina pilot

  2. A different view - Missouri

  3. Variation on the theme - LA County's NexCare Call Center

To ease some of the technical load, NLM is hosting Go Local applications. Thus localities (states) will shoulder only the following responsibilities.

  1. Participants enter records using a web-based form.

  2. NLM systems build the local pages based on the records.

  3. Participants set up some customization of each site for branding.

  4. NLM controls and maintains the list of local terms and term mappings, using cross-references as needed.

Getting your state involved?

  1. Follow the links to the Go Local information and requirements within MedlinePlus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/golocal.html

  2. Submit a proposal for your state or region by e-mailing it to Janice Kelly, jkelly@hshsl.umaryland.edu , Executive Director for the SE/A Regional Medical Library by April 12, 2004.

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

NLM and Health Literacy

excerpted from Surgeon General Carmona's Speech to the National Library of Medicine's Board of Regents. February 10, 2004

NLM's health literacy activities reflect the Library's strong commitment to serving all of our nation's citizens. I'm pleased that NLM has extended its outreach from the original focus on health care professionals, researchers, and medical librarians to include patients, their families, and the general public.

Increasing the public's access to health information will increase Americans' health literacy. Through outstanding websites such as MedlinePlus , PubMed , the Household Products Database, the new SeniorHealth.gov, and others, NLM is encouraging healthy lifestyles and disease prevention. I am particularly impressed with the wide range of NLM-sponsored outreach initiatives, especially those that focus on minority and underserved communities.

The Hispanic outreach projects in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas are strong examples of the innovative approaches taken by NLM, including the project that supports the work of "promotoras de salud" to improve the health status of people living in the Colonias.

In addition, NLM's new "Listening Circle" initiative shows that the Library is leading the way to meet with Native American communities on an informal, collegial basis to improve communication; explore ideas, needs, and capabilities; and develop new collaborations. The "Listening Circle" project is consistent with the Administration's commitment to community-based consultation and partnership.

Dr. Lindberg and the NLM staff are to be congratulated on these innovative efforts. Your work in the area of health literacy will resonate throughout the health care system and across America for years to come. Many of you are the power behind the growing body of evidence supporting the need to improve Americans' health literacy. Many of you are also engaged in helping to increase the public's understanding of health information.

This is critically important work. As a former nurse and more recently a trauma surgeon and public health director, I worked alongside my colleagues to convince our patients and our communities to choose healthy behaviors to help prevent illness and injury. But often there was a wall between us and the people we were trying to serve. It was a wall of confusion and misunderstanding brought on by low functional literacy skills. And, unfortunately, it was sometimes shored up by our inability as health care professionals to recognize that our patients didn't understand the health information that we were trying to communicate. We must close the gap between what health care professionals know and what the rest of America understands.

For the Surgeon's General's complete remarks, go to http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/news/speeches/nlm_lowlit_02102004.htm

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations Address

by Becky Hebert, specific populations coordinator

The word heard over and over at the second annual National Congress of American Indians State of Indian Nations Address was sovereignty, sovereignty, sovereignty. NCAI President Tex G. Hall, giving the address this year in full regalia, stressed that the solution to current Indian nation struggles and hardships is for each tribe to be self-governing in its own unique way. Mismanagement and underfunding of the federal trust leaves many needs unmet in Indian Country according to President Hall and the July 2003 U.S. Commission on Civil Rights report.

Healthcare was one of the major areas described as "grossly neglected" in the federal trust commitment. With life expectancy at 5 years less than other races in the US and diabetes mortality rates three times the national average, President Hall declared that Indian nations are in a health care crisis. Diabetes, heart disease, cancer, suicide, and alcoholism are having "epidemic impacts" and are "disproportionately severe in Indian country."

Lack of funding is to blame for these health issues and environmental safety concerns like unsafe drinking water, inadequate sanitation systems, and unclean air. Underfunded infrastructure hazards like the 33% of unpaved Indian country roads and a quarter of the bridges "structurally deficient," led the Indian Health Services to find that vehicular deaths are "400% of the national average" and the leading cause of death for Native youth.

President Hall and the NCAI asked Congress to work with tribes to resolve the monetary mismanagement and to recognize the inherent right of tribes to the sovereignty they have had long before Europeans arrived.

The good news is that "NCAI is working hard to address these challenges" by working with tribal and state governments to improve relationships. NCAI is working to improve the education and the understanding that sovereignty is inherent and cannot be delegated.

The address was followed by a question and answer period with the audience which included members of the press, Indian leaders, and tribal members. A reporter from NBC Alaska asked what was the most crucial issue that must be addressed, that cannot wait. NCAI Executive Director Jacqueline Johnson replied with four main issues:

  1. Protection of sovereignty and jurisdiction issues,

  2. Trust issues and reform,

  3. Appropriation levels, and

  4. Native vote to support candidates who will work to resolve these issues.

Another member of the audience from the Mohican tribe who has worked to fight substance abuse in Indian country stated that in President Bush's State of the Union Address the night before, Bush said that there has been an 11% decrease in substance abuse in the United States, but this statistic does not reflect the problems in Native communities. The Mohican speaker also stated that, without proper resources, once someone has recovered from substance abuse, they have a high risk of relapse. Ms. Johnson replied that the NCAI is partnering with the National American Indian Health Board to monitor this situation and that NCAI has also participated with HHS and HIS to develop the FY05 budget.
More on the address and on NCAI can be found at: http://www.ncai.org/
Audio of the address is at: http://www.connectlive.com/events/ncai/

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine is doing its part to improve health information education and provide needed funding to Native communities. MedlinePlus has a full section on Native American Health with information on nutrition, prevention and screening, research, conditions specific to American Indians, statistics, women and children's health, and more. You can find out more about the Native American Health page at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/nativeamericanhealth.html

In addition to the online resources from NLM, our new outreach initiative funds project partnerships of librarians and local community groups such as Indian tribes to improve health information access to help fight the "epidemic impacts" of diabetes, heart disease, and the other the conditions President Hall spoke about affecting Native Americans so disproportionately. There is currently a request for proposals to fund such community outreach projects. If you are interested in working with your local library or with a tribe in your community, check out the RFP on our website at: http://nnlm.gov/sea/outreach/rfqs/2004/acesselec.pdf

Also be watching for the release of the new Native American Health website from the Specialized Information Services department of NLM coming soon.

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

by Ann Farrell - farrell@mayo.edu, Bursak Biomedical Library of the Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida

Educating library support staff and library end users is a given for library professionals. However, in my case, I do not have a background in curriculum or instructional design. Therefore, the few classes I've taught were developed from an instructor perspective not a learner perspective. An opportunity to learn instructional design presented itself in the form of a ten-week course on instructional systems design at our local university. Serendipity presented itself when Janice Kelly sent an email to the nnlm-sea distribution list informing us of the availability of professional development awards. I immediately applied for one to take the instructional design class. And I was thrilled when Janice informed me that SE/A would fund this class!

The class was held from August 11, 2003 through October 20, 2003 at the University of North Florida's Division of Continuing Education. The instructor had her PhD in instructional design from Florida State University, and worked as an instructional designer for a large corporation here in Jacksonville, Florida. The text she used was The Systematic Design of Instruction, 5th edition, by Walter Dick, Lou Carey and James O. Carey. To pass the course, we had to develop a one-hour class based on the ADDIE model (Analyze, Develop, Design, Implement, Evaluate); this model helps you develop your class from the learner perspective.

My prototype class was "Teaching library assistants to search the web-based library catalog", which, I thought, would fit in with the development of career ladders for our professional and paraprofessional staff in our libraries. I envisioned the class to be both a hands-on class for our library assistants as well as a web-based class as our institution has a site license for WebCT (www.webct.com). I also thought that the content could be easily edited to work for library end users who wanted to learn how to search the OPAC. I am now in the process of collaborating with one of my colleagues at our Mayo site in Rochester, MN to bring this class to life.

For those thinking about applying for a professional development award, the application process is painless, and the SE/A staff is very efficient in processing your application. With this award I was able to take a class that otherwise was not within my budget.

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

by Ann Farrell - farrell@mayo.edu, Bursak Biomedical Library, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida

Our Mayo campus in Jacksonville, Florida is in the planning phase of a new 214-bed hospital to be located on the same campus as our outpatient clinic. The current hospital is located nine miles away. The Bursak Biomedical Library, on our large and expansive outpatient clinic site, is not centrally located for the majority of physician and nursing staff. Results from focus groups indicated that additional library space, centrally located to the hospital, was desirable.

From the always timely MLA-Focus emails, I learned that NLM and AASHL were hosting a two day symposium "Library as Place: Symposium on Building and Revitalizing Health Sciences Libraries in the Digital Age" (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/building/agenda.html) in November 2003. As oxymoronic as this may sound, I couldn't afford not to go to this symposium. BUT, our administration had asked us to cut back on expenses so my travel budget was gone. I decided I was going to live dangerously-I was going to apply for a second Professional Development, award from SE/A!

I first inquired at the SE/A offices if it would be acceptable to apply for a second award in the same year. As the program had been underutilized for 2003, and the application did fit the criteria, SE/A did not have a problem if I applied for a second award. I did apply and was again accepted for funding.

The symposium was held November 5 - 6, 2003, at the Lister Hill Center on the NIH campus. (To view the complete program, go to http://www.nlm.nih.gov/building/agenda.html) Posters pictorially presented how libraries have renovated spaces or built new spaces to accommodate the needs of their users. Panel discussions covered the library as physical place and virtual space, as a place for education, research, scholarship, learning and discovery, as a public space for art exhibits, music events, and receptions. Panelists presented concepts such as the library as a knowledge coach, an information hub, point- of-need learning space, a collaborative space, and a media kitchen with multidisciplinary teams creating multimedia products. Panelists questioned and debated the need for a physical space. Eugenie Prime of Hewlett-Packard said "It's not either / or, it's AND." James Neal from Columbia University said that physical libraries would not be necessary by 2013. Several questioned the need to retain large runs of periodical volumes, which require large stack areas. So if (or when) we reduce the stack area, how can we re-use that space effectively?

What did I learn from this symposium? For me, in theory, library as place is important-that it is "AND" not "either / or", but that the building or space won't be as large as the need. This gets to the points made by the architect Alexander Lamis and designer/engineer Jeremy Faludi-the space needs to be designed for a sustainable future. And also the points made by Jim Neal that learners are multi-taskers, connected simultaneously to multiple channels. Therefore, the space needs to be as flexible as possible, so that it can morph into whatever it needs to be when it needs to be that space-learning, quiet, collaborative, community, multipurpose, inviting, research, scholarly, accessible. With that said, if I were to choose which presentation was the most pertinent to our situation at Mayo, where space is always a premium, I would choose Catherine Boss's presentation (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/building/Boss.ppt) on combining a medical/nursing library and business center for patients and their families into one space at the Jersey Shore Medical Center. Catherine discussed location, functionality, ambience, and funding as the major drivers of their new library space. What struck me the most in her presentation was that medical staff and patients could share the same space harmoniously, which goes back to earlier points about being flexible and sustainable.

Again, I thank Janice Kelly and her staff at SE/A who made it possible for me to attend a very timely and important symposium.

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Coming to Maryland Public and Medical Librarians, Summer, 2004, Ask and You Can Be Next

Prescription for Success:
Consumer Health Information
on the Internet

Pad This introduction to consumer health will cover the information-seeking behaviors of consumers, the basics of MedlinePlus , DIRLINE®, ClinicalTrials.gov and other reliable web pages such as those from professional medical associations and advocacy groups. It will cover sites devoted to pharmaceutical information for consumers, drug-interaction databases and herbal information. (3hrs)

From Snake Oil to Penicillin:
Evaluating Consumer Health Information on the Internet

This course will describe why it is important to evaluate websites. Participants will be given criteria for how to evaluate health information on the Internet. (3hrs)

Librarian

Looking in all the Wrong Places: PubMed for Public Librarians

PubMed This class will cover basic and field searching, journal browser, single citation matcher, clipboard, history and other features. It will also cover how to obtain full-text articles. (3 hrs)

Reference Rx:
Developing a Consumer Health Information Service

RX This class will cover the information seeking behaviors of consumers. It will also address the recommended core reference collection, as well as databases and newsletters/ periodicals. It will cover the reference interview, disclaimers, and privacy as well as networking with medical librarians. The class will introduce the students to the Medical Library Association and its local chapters. It will describe possible ways to market this service in a community. (4 hrs)

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS): Its Purpose, Its Publications Its News

http://www.nigms.nih.gov/

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) supports basic biomedical research on genes, proteins, and cells. It also funds studies on fundamental processes such as how cells communicate, how our bodies use energy, and how we respond to medicines. The results of this research increase our understanding of life and lay the foundation for advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. The Institute's research training programs produce the next generation of biomedical scientists, and NIGMS has programs to encourage minorities underrepresented in biomedical science to pursue research careers.

Medicines By Design: NIH Pub. No. 03-474, revised 2003, 54 pages, also http://www.nigms.nih.gov/medbydesign/booklet.pdf PDF This educational booklet about pharmacology explains how scientists unravel the many different ways medicines work in the body and how this information guides the hunt for drugs of the future. Medicines By Design describes the science of pharmacology, discusses how drugs work in the body, and presents some of the latest research developments in the field.

Medicines for YOU: NIH Pub. No. 00-4657, printed 2000, 4-fold brochure
Medicamentos Para Usted
http://www.nigms.nih.gov/funding/MedicineForYou.pdf PDF
http://www.nigms.nih.gov/funding/sp_medforyou.html Spanish
Just like diet and lifestyle, genes can affect how people respond to medicines. This brochure describes in lay language the science of pharmacogenetics and answers questions about pharmacogenetics research.

Findings
National Institutes of Health http://www.nigms.nih.gov/news/findings/

finding

National Institute of General Medical Services brings you Findings, where you can learn about scientists doing cutting-edge biology and chemistry research.

Next Article

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

gathered by Beth M Wescott, editor

African Americans Uniting for Life
http://webusers.xula.edu/jeckert/hoa/aaul.html
Addresses the serious under representation of African Americans on the Marrow Donor Registry. Because of the manner in which the HLA antigens (the blood cell traits used to match a donor with a patient) are inherited, the likelihood of African American patient finding a suitable donor is greatest within his/her own racial group. Consequently, a disproportionate number of African Americans are dying from treatable diseases because a marrow donor cannot be located.

Asian Pacific Islander Donors Can Save Lives
http://www.marrow.org/NMDP/api_english.html
More Asian, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander volunteer donors are needed, so others can have a chance for a future.

Association of Organ Procurement Organizations
http://www.aopo.org
AOPO represents and serves organ procurement organizations through advocacy, support, and development of activities that will maximize the availability of organs and tissues and enhance the quality, effectiveness, and integrity of the donation process.

Hispanics Giving Hope
http://www.marrow.org/NMDP/hgh_english.html
Hispanics and Latinos are linked by a common heritage that binds them as one. Language and culture unite them as brothers and sisters. Those same traits that connect them as one family can also help keep the "family" healthy and well. Many Hispanic patients with leukemia, aplastic anemia and other life-threatening diseases must find an unrelated matched donor, most likely someone from the same racial or ethnic background.

Keep the Circle Strong
http://www.marrow.org/NMDP/aian.html
Only 1 percent of the approximately 4 million volunteers in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Registry are American Indians and Alaska Natives. There is an urgent need for volunteer marrow donors from the American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

National Marrow Donor Program: Reaching Black and African American Communities
http://www.marrow.org
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Commits to Partnership with NMDP
The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) is pleased to announce a new partnership with Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. to help the NMDP raise awareness, educate and recruit committed potential marrow and blood stem cell donors in the Black and African American communities.

National Minority Organ and Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP)
http://www.nationalmottep.org
Dedicated to addressing the problems that minorities face with organ and tissue transplantation.

Touchdown for Life
http://www.themarrowfoundation.org/
The Foundation�s goals are to increase the size and diversity of the National Registry of unrelated marrow doors.

United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)
http://www.unos.org/SharedContentDocuments/African_American_2.2003.pdf PDF
12% of the U.S. population is African American.
35% of patients awaiting kidney transplants are African American.
The African American recruitment program at UNOS uses numbers and hard facts to focus attention on the need for more African American donors.

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Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

What's New at NLM, NN/LM and Their Partners?

  1. As part of the MedlinePlus Go Local initiative, NLM is developing a centrally supported Go Local system to help states and large regions develop web sites of local services. NLM is now seeking a first round of proposals from libraries and other groups interested in using the system. More information on Go Local proposals is available at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/golocal.html Also note that NLM's Go Local links from MedlinePlus health topics now include Missouri's CommunityConnection.org. CommunityConnection.org has been providing Missourians with access to health and community services statewide for several years. Missouri's links extend the Go Local project piloted by the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill with NCHealthInfo

  2. OLDMEDLINE Moves Back in Time
    The contents of the 1951-1952 Current List of Medical Literature (CLML) were added to PubMed in February 2004. OLDMEDLINE citations now total 1,704,728 citations, with the addition of these 186,889 citations from the 1951-1952 publications. Of these newly added citations, 89,557 are from the 1952 CLML and 97,332 are from the 1951 CLML.

    OLDMEDLINE is a subset of PubMed available free of charge at http://pubmed.gov For information about OLDMEDLINE, please see: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/databases/databases_oldmedline.html You can read more on OLDMEDLINE citations in the following NLM Technical Bulletin article: Demsey A, Nahin AM, Von Braunsberg S. OLDMEDLINE Citations Join PubMed. NLM Tech Bull. 2003 Sep-Oct;(334):e2.

  3. MedlinePlus Improvements
    MedlinePlus also released a new page designed for low vision users. It is linked from the health topics home page (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/lowvision.html). This new page provides links to the popular interactive health tutorials and NIHSeniorHealth.gov topics formatted with larger fonts and more space between links to facilitate ease of use. Both the tutorials and NIHSeniorHealth topics give users the option to listen to the content being read aloud. NIHSeniorHealth is formatted with large fonts and other low vision tools, including the ability to enlarge the fonts further and to view pages with high contrast that has been found to be easier to read for individuals with low vision.

  4. Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines
    In an ongoing effort to substantially improve the effectiveness and efficiency of federal government health information on the World Wide Web, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a comprehensive set of Web design guidelines based on research studies in the field.

    The Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines represent several years of intense effort by NCI to identify Web design-related research and compile a practical set of guidelines. These guidelines, are located on NCI's Usability.gov Web site (http://usability.gov/guides/index.html).

  5. Specialized Information Services and PDAs
    The National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) introduced the "Review of PDA Applications in Toxicology and Environmental Health," (links to http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/Tox/PDAReview/PDAHomePage.htm) an ongoing descriptive review of selected PDA applications in the fields of toxicology and environmental health.

    Individual reports in the review series are based on downloadable demo versions of selected PDA applications. Each review typically covers: General Information, Intended Users, Authorship/Data Source, Contents,Navigation, Requirements, Application Type/Price, Availability, Useful Web Links, and Updates when applicable.

  6. CDC's Latest E-Journal Debutes
    CDC is starting up a new peer-reviewed e-journal journal entitled Preventing Chronic Disease. It's free and is directed toward practitioners as well as researchers. The URL is http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/index.htm

  7. New MS Word Downloads at the National Guideline Clearinghouse™
    A new MS Word download feature is now available on the National Guideline Clearinghouse Web site - Web site, an online public resource for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The complete summary for each guideline represented in the NGCTMdatabase can be downloaded and viewed on all computers that use Microsoft Word. NGCTM content may also be downloaded to Personal Digital Assistants that can read Microsoft Word documents. For more information on this new view of NGCTMcontent, Select the MS Word download page available on the NGCTM Web site.

  8. Joint Effort to Improve the Health of Older Hispanic Americans
    The FDA teams up with the Administration on Aging to help prevent diseases in older Hispanic Americans. http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2004/104_old.html

    The older Hispanic population is at high risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, HIV infection, stroke, pneumonia, diabetes and influenza. "Many of these conditions are preventable," Carbonell said at the roundtable. "For example, we know that immunizations effectively prevent influenza." In 2003, almost one-third of Hispanic seniors did not receive a flu shot. "We need to work on these issues," said Carbonell.

    The Hispanic population over age 65 was 2 million in 2002 and is projected to grow to more than 13 million by 2050. Hispanics made up 5.5 percent of the entire older U.S. population in 2002; by 2050, Hispanics are expected to account for 16 percent of the older U.S. population.

NLM Technical Bulletin Table of contents

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

Link to single article Back to issue index

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Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

NLM Technical Bulletin Table of Contents

January - February, 2004
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/jf04/jf04_issue_cover.html

Technical Notes: - e1

Bosnian-New Language for MEDLINE® Citations

PubMed Adds Three New Language Abbreviations and Changes Two Abbreviations Already in Use

January 2004 PubMed , NLM Gateway , and ClinicalTrials.gov Training Manuals Now Available

Three Additional Journals Participating in PubMedCentral

Additional Digitized Back Issues Available in PubMedCentral

New E-mail List Alerts Readers to Bookshelf Updates

"Map of locations" Feature Added to ClinicalTrials.gov

New Book Added to NCBI Bookshelf

Three More Organisms Added for Gene Indexing

Eight Entries Added to ToxTown

OLDMEDLINE Moves Back in Time

Changes for PubMed 's Clinical Queries

PubMed Subject Subset Strategies Updated

Issue Completed, February 26, 2004
Go to the Technical Bulletin Web Page

Upcoming Events

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Upcoming Events
April - August 2004

April 5-11

National Public Health Week, "Eliminating Health Disparities: Communities Moving from Statistics to Solutions."
To find out more please visit http://www.apha.org/nphw/

April 18-24

National Library Week
http://www.ala.org/ala/pio/campaign/nlw/nationallibraryweek.htm

May 3-

Alliance of Information and Referral Systems "2-1-1"
"Catch the Wave of I and R"
Norfolk, VA http://www.airs.org/events/events_conference.asp

May 4-5

Diversity in Libraries Conference
Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center in Midtown Atlanta
http://www.librarydiversity.org/

May 5-7

Maryland Library Association Conference, 2004
" Innovation: thinking outside the boardwalk" Clarion Resort, Ocean City, MD
http://www.mdlib.org/conference/index.htm

May 19

National Employee Health and Fitness Day, "Be Active for Life"
http://www.physicalfitness.org/nehf.html

May 21-26

"Seize the Power" Medical Library Association
Washington Hilton and Towers in Washington, DC
http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2004/index.html

May 26-28

South Carolina Public Health Association
Springmaid Beach Conference Center, Myrtle Beach, SC
http://www.scpha.com/annual.htm

June 6 - 13

Capital Pride "Pride + Vote = Power!"
Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 3rd
Washington, DC http://www.capitalpride.org/

June 24-30

American Library Association
Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL
http://www.ala.org/ala/eventsandconferencesb/annual/an2004/home.htm

July 31 - August 4

National AHEC Organization Conference
" Staying the Course in a Sea of Change"
Baltimore, MD Marriott Waterfront Hotel
http://www.naoconference.com

Publication Information

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.

blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration transparent text decoration blue text decoration

Inside this issue of SEA Currents

New RFP - Access to Electronic Health Information

Go Local Informational Meeting Being Heald at MLA in May 2004

NLM and Health Literacy

National Congress of American Indians 2nd Annual State of Indian Nations

Serendipity: Part I - Professional Development Awards

Serendipity: Part II - Library as Place

Classes Designed for Public Librarians

Taking a Look at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Organ Donor Resources for Minority Communities

What's New at NLM, NNLM and Their Partners

In every issue:

Table of Contents for the NLM Technical Bulletin

Upcoming Events - April 2004-August 2004

Publication Information

Back to issue as one page

SEA Currents Logo

SEA Currents Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

SEA Currents is a bimonthly publication of the Southeastern/Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Publication Information

This Issue: SEA Currents, Volume 22, Number 2 -- March/April 2004

Please send items and contributed articles for SEA Currents to Beth M. Wescott, Editor, at: bwescott@hshsl.umaryland.edu

NN/LM SE/A Region
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Health Sciences and Human Services Library
601 W. Lombard Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1512

Phone: 410-706-2855 or 1-800-338-7657 Choose 1 for Regional Network Office
Fax: 410-706-0099
URI: http://nnlm.gov/sea/

NN/LM SE/A Staff:

MJ Tooey, Director, mjtooey@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-7545

Janice Kelly, Executive Director, jkelly@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Becky Hebert, Specific Populations Outreach Coordinator, bhebert@hshsl. umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Jana Liebermann (Allcock), Consumer Health Coordinator, jlieber@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

J. Dale Prince, Technology Coordinator, dprince@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Outreach Coordinator (Vacant), 410-706-2855

Beth Wescott, Network Access Coordinator, bwescott@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Toni Yancey, Outreach Coordinator, tyancey@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Colette Becker, Assistant to the Executive Director/Technology Assistant, cbecker@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Ruth Collins, Secretary, rcollins@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Evelyn Peyton, Secretary, epeyton@hshsl.umaryland.edu, 410-706-2855

Network members may subscribe to the SE/A electronic mailing list by following the instructions found at: http://nnlm.gov/sea/aboutus/nnlm-sea.html

SEA Currents: Newsletter of the Southeastern Atlantic Region, National Network of Libraries of Medicine® (NN/LM) is published bi-monthly by NN/LM SE/A.

This issue as one page

This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.


This issue as one page SEA Currents Archives (Previous Issues)

NOTE: This is a newsletter. The links and information are up to date when published and are NOT updated after the published date.